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Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi)
Published by Universitas Airlangga
ISSN : 19783728     EISSN : 24429740     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
The Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) (e-ISSN:2442-9740; p-ISSN:1978-3728) is published by the Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga. Its diciplinary focus is dental science and dental hygiene. The Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) is published in English on a quarterly basis with each 50-60 page edition containing between nine and eleven scientific articles on research, study literature and case studies. Contributors to the Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) included: dental researchers, dental practitioners, lecturers, and students drawn from Indonesia and a wide range of other countries.
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Articles 13 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 52, No 1 (2019): (March 2019)" : 13 Documents clear
The role of Kuniran (U. moluccensis) and Gurami (O. goramy) fish thorns and scales in increasing salivary leukocyte and monocyte cells viability against Streptococcus mutans Dewanti, I Dewa Ayu Ratna; Susilawati, I Dewa Ayu; Purwanto, P.; Lestari, Pujiana Endah; Budirahardjo, Roedy; Setyorini, Dyah; Yani, Ristya Widi Endah; Wulandari, Erawati; Wahyukundari, Melok Aris
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 52, No 1 (2019): (March 2019)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v52.i1.p45-50

Abstract

Background: Kuniran thorns and Gurami fish scales are rich in protein and minerals such as dentin believed to increase cell viability against Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) that causes dental caries. These, in turn, can cause systemic diseases if left untreated. Purpose: This study aims to analyze the influence of Kuniran thorns and Gurami fishes scales on the viability of monocytes and salivary leukocytes against S. mutans. Methods: Monocytes and leukocytes salivary cells were placed on a microtiter plate and treated according to the nature of each group. This study comprised the following groups: control group: untreated; S. mutans group: induced by S. Mutans; Gurami thorn group: thorns + S. Mutans; Gurami scales group: scales + S. Mutans; Kuniran thorn group: thorns + S. Mutans; Kuniran scales group: scales + S. mutans. Viability analysis involved staining with Tripan Blue. Furthermore, the number of viable cells (white) was calculated under an inverted microscope at 200 times magnification from five fields of view. Data was analyzed by means of an ANOVA test followed by LSD test. Results: The ANOVA and LSD tests confirmed significant differences (0.01<P). Kuniran thorns and Gurami fish scales increased the viability of monocytes and salivary leukocytes, but not significantly. The content of flavonoids, amino acids, omega 3, omega 6 and antioxidants increased leukocyte metabolism, thereby increasing cell resistance to S. mutans infection. Conclusion: Kuniran thorns (U. moluccensis) and Gurami (O. goramy) fish scales increase the viability of salivary leukocyte and monocyte cells against Streptococcus mutans.
The different symptoms determining management of hand foot and mouth disease and primary varicella zoster infection Apriasari, Maharani Laillyza
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 52, No 1 (2019): (March 2019)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v52.i1.p32-35

Abstract

Background: Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) is a medical condition endemic among children in South-East Asia, including Indonesia and, more specifically, Banjarmasin – the capital of South Sulawesi. The disease is mediated by Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus 16 which attack the oral cavity, hands, feet, buttocks and genital areas. One differential diagnosis of this disease is Primary Varicella Zoster infection. Both diseases have similar clinical symptoms but different etiologies which can precipitate errors in the administration of therapy Purpose: To elucidate the distinction between HFMD and Primary varicella zoster infection. Case: An 8 year-old male sought treatment complaining of ulcers on the upper maxillary gingiva followed by the appearance of itchy and painful lesions affecting the nose, upper lip, hands and feet. The patient’s mother reported his history of 39oC fever followed by the development of red spots and ulcers on the face, hands and feet which caused itching. Clinically, it is similar to Primary varicella zoster infection which can affect any part of the body. The patient only used an immunomodulator once a day and was actively seeking available healthcare. Case management: Extraoral examination confirmed the presence of multiple erythematous vesicles and ulcers, 2 mm in diameter, which caused a sensation of itching around the nose and upper lip region. Multiple painful and itchy red macules and vesicles, 3-6 mm in diameter, appeared not only on the patient’s palms, back of the hands and feet. Intraoral examination of the right maxillary gingiva revealed multiple painful ulcers, 1-2 mm in diameter and yellowish in appearance, surrounded by erythema. The results of history-taking implied that no lesions appeared on other parts of the body. Conclusion: While these conditions share similar clinical manifestations, their contrasting etiologies require different treatments. The ultimate diagnosis can be determined clinically by the dentist, thereby preventing errors in the administration of therapy.
Protection against periodontal destruction in diabetic condition with Sardinella longiceps fish oil: expression of matrix-metalloproteinase 8 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 Damaiyanti, Dian Widya; Mulawarmanti, Dian; Parisihni, Kristanti
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 52, No 1 (2019): (March 2019)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v52.i1.p51-56

Abstract

Background: There is strong evidence to support the claim that periodontitis may be more prevalent among diabetic individuals. Collagen degradation represents one of the key events in periodontal destructive lesions. The level of matrix metalloproteinase 8 (MMP-8) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) are key to periodontal collagenolysis and associated with the severity of periodontal inflammation and disease. Host modulatory therapy has been proposed as a treatment for periodontal diseases. Sardinella longiceps (lemuru) fish oil containing polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), including omega 3 and 6, has been shown to possess therapeutic anti-inflammatory and protective properties effective against inflammatory diseases, including periodontitis. Purpose: The study aimed to examine the effect of dietary supplementation of Sardinella longiceps fish oil on protection against periodontal destruction resulting from the expression of MMP-8 and TIMP-1. Methods: Wistar rat samples are divided into four groups: a negative control group and three groups receiving Sardinella longiceps fish oil treatment (4 ml/ weight (Kg), 8 ml/ weight (Kg) and 16 ml/ weight (Kg). One week before treatment, all groups were administered with streptozotocin (STZ) 65 ml/ weight (Kg) and nicotinamide 110 ml/ weight (Kg) to induce diabetic conditions. Immunohistochemistry slides of periodontal tissues were prepared after three weeks of treatment. The expression of MMP-8 and TIMP-1 was counted using the HSCORE index, data was analyzed by means of non-parametric methods using Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann-Whitney tests. Results: Statistical analyses confirmed a significant increase in MMP-8 expression and a reduction in TIMP-1 expression in the negative control group compared to the treatment group (p<0.05). Meanwhile, the treatment group showed a significant reduction in MMP-8 expression and a marked increase in TIMP-1 expression, with the best result produced by the administering of 16 ml/ weight (Kg) Sardinella longiceps fish oil to the treatment group (p<0.05). Conclusion: Dietary supplementation of Sardinella longiceps fish oil can protect against periodontal destruction under diabetic conditions, by decreasing MMP-8 expression and increasing TIMP-1 expression.
Back-matter Majalah Kedokteran Gigi, Dental Journal
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 52, No 1 (2019): (March 2019)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar

Abstract

The effect of UDMA and Bis-GMA irradiation period on residual monomers in resin packable composite Rosha, Jayanti; Soetojo, Adioro; Budha, Putu Dewi Purnama Sari; Mudjiono, M.
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 52, No 1 (2019): (March 2019)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v52.i1.p24-26

Abstract

Background: Residual monomers are non-polymerized monomers which can cause clinical harm, for example inflammation, to oral cavity tissue while the remaining monomers can potentially be carcinogenic. The more residual monomers that remain due to an imperfect polymerization processes, the lower the compressive strength level and the higher the number of micro slits that can cause secondary caries and tooth sensitivity. Urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA) and bisphenol A glycol dimethacrylate (Bis-GMA) constitute two of the resins most frequently used in packable composites. During the short irradiaton period forming part of the polymerization process, UDMA and Bis-GMA have the potential to produce residual monomers. Purpose: This study aimed to compare the number of residual monomers in packable composite resin following irradiation lasting 1x20 seconds and 2x20 seconds. Methods: 28 samples of cylindrical packable composite with a thickness of 2 mm and a diameter of 5 mm were divided into four groups. Groups 1 and 2 were irradiated for 1x20 seconds, and groups 3 and 4 for 2x20 seconds with the composite subsequently being immersed in ethanol solution for 24 hours. The number of residual monomers using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) devices was calculated and the results statistically analyzed using a Mann-Whitney Test. Results: Repeated irradiation had no effect on the amount of residual monomers in packable composite resins. However, there were differences in the number of residual monomers in the material contained in packable composite resins Bis-GMA and UDMA, while the remaining monomers in UDMA outnumbered those in Bis-GMA. Conclusion: The number of residual monomers in Bis-GMA is lower than in the remaining UDMA after 1x20 seconds irradiation, while the number of residual monomers in Bis-GMA and UDMA following 2x20 seconds irradiation was no different to that after irradiation of 1x20 seconds duration.
The difference in microleakage levels of nanohybrid composite resin using eighth-generation ethanol and isopropanol solvent bonding materials under moist and dry conditions (in vitro study) Dwiandhono, Irfan; Logamarta, Setiadi W.; Dhanurdara, Taura
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 52, No 1 (2019): (March 2019)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v52.i1.p41-44

Abstract

Background: Microleakage during restoration causes secondary caries. The shrinkage of nanohybrid composite resin can occur during the polymerization process, affected by both the selection of bonding materials featuring different solvents, such as ethanol and isopropanol, as well as contrasting conditions such as moist and dry. Purpose: This study aimed to determine and analyze the differences of microleakage level of nanohybrid composite resin using the eighth-generation bonding materials made from ethanol and isopropanol solvents under moist and dry conditions. Methods: This research constituted an experimental laboratory study. The samples were divided into four groups. Group I used a bonding material produced from ethanol under dry conditions. Group II used a bonding material produced from ethanol under moist conditions. Group III used a bonding material produced from isopropanol under dry conditions. Group IV used a bonding material produced from isopropanol under moist conditions. The levels of microleakage were subsequently tested using a stereo microscope. Results: Microleakage examination was performed by means of a stereo microscope to observe the methylene blue color penetration with assessment subsequently being performed on a scale of 0 to 3. The statistical results of a Kruskal-Wallis test showed that no significant differences occurred in any of the treatment groups (sig = 0.141, p<0.05). Conclusion: There was no difference in the microleakage levels of nanohybrid composite resin using eighth-generation bonding materials produced from ethanol and isopropanol solvents under moist and dry conditions.
Musculoskeletal disorder risk level evaluation of posterior maxillary tooth extraction procedures Prayudha, Anggy; Simandjuntak, Roberto M.; Sumarta, Ni Putu Mira
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 52, No 1 (2019): (March 2019)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v52.i1.p18-23

Abstract

Background: The professional activity of dentists involves a relatively small treatment area, namely; the oral cavity. Dental treatment requires a high level of precision with the result that dentists frequently perform their duties in a physically uncomfortable position over a relatively extended period of time. Tooth extraction is the most common form of treatment performed in a standing position, with extraction of the posterior maxillary tooth being the most challenging. 80 per cent of students and dentists working in the Faculty of Dentistry at the University of Indonesia present musculoskeletal disorders (MSD). Purpose: To evaluate the level of MSD risk of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinic students at the Universitas Airlangga Dental Hospital following posterior maxillary tooth extraction. Methods: The evaluation of MSD risk level was performed over a period of three months on 73 subjects who had experienced posterior maxillary tooth extraction, categorized as extraction under anaesthesia, extraction involving the use of an elevator and extraction using forceps. Evaluation was conducted by two observers by means of CCTV video footage using a Rapid Entire Body Assessment (REBA) worksheet. Results: Under anaesthetic sedation, 67.12% experienced medium risk, 31.51% high risk, and 1.37% low risk. During extraction using an elevator, 58.90% experienced high risk, 35.62% medium risk and 5.48% extremely high risk. During extraction using forceps, 57.53% ran medium risk, 39.73% high risk, and 2.74% extremely high risk. Conclusion: Students who performed posterior maxillary tooth extraction could be categorized as running a high risk of MSD during extraction using an elevator, but medium risk when administering anaesthesia and performing extraction with forceps.
Front-matter Majalah Kedokteran Gigi, Dental Journal
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 52, No 1 (2019): (March 2019)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

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Abstract

The treatment of gingival recession with coronally advanced flap with platelet-rich fibrin Dewi, Asti Rosmala; Susanto, Agus; Rusyanti, Yanti
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 52, No 1 (2019): (March 2019)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v52.i1.p8-12

Abstract

Background: Of the various techniques developed for the treatment of gum recession, the current innovation in the use of platelet rich plasma (PRF) has been applied to the treatment of root-end closure procedures. Purpose: This study analyzed the effect of the coronally advanced flap (CAF) in combination with platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) during treatment of gingival recession. Methods: This research constituted an experimental study incorporating a split-mouth design which was conducted on eight participants (with 16 recession defects) who were divided into two groups consisting of the CAF group with PRF and another CAF group without PRF. Clinical parameters consisting of gingival recession (GR), keratinized gingival width (KGW), recession width (RW) and clinical attachment level (CAL) were measured both before and 21 days after surgery). Results: The average differences between clinical parameters in the test group were as follows: GR (2.25 ± 0.27), KGW (1.81 ± 0.75), RW (3.44 ± 1.35), and CAL (2.56 ± 0.50); while in the control group they were as follows: GR (2.00 ± 0.71), KGW (1.94 ± 0.78), RW (3.50 ± 1.91) and CAL (2.00 ± 0.76). There were significant differences in the GR and CAL between the test and control groups (p ≤ 0.05). Conclusion: A combination of the CAF procedure and PRF was proven to be more effective in covering the GR and increasing the CAL.
The difference between porcelain and composite resin shear bond strength in the administration of 4% and 19.81% silane Widjiastuti, Ira; Junaedi, Dwina Rahmawati; Effendy, Ruslan
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 52, No 1 (2019): (March 2019)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v52.i1.p27-31

Abstract

Background: Damage to porcelain restorations such as fractures requires a repair that can be performed either directly or indirectly. Direct repair involves directly performing restoration of fractured porcelain with a composite resin application. This technique has more advantages than indirect repair because it requires no laboratory work and can be completed during a single visit. Silane, on the other hand, has been widely used and is reported to increase porcelain and composite resin attachments during the direct repair process. Purpose: This study aimed to determine the differences in shear bond strength between porcelain and composite resin during the administering of 4% and 19.81% silane. Methods: 27 porcelain samples were divided into three groups, namely: Group A - 4% silane, Group B - 19.81% silane and Group C - no silane, prior to the application of composite resin. Each sample was tested for shear bond strength by means of Autograph and fracture analysis performed through stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscope tests. Data analysis was subsequently performed using an ANOVA test. Results: There was a significant difference between the three groups with p=0.000 (p<0.005). The lowest bond strength was found in the group without silane, while the highest was in the group with 4% silane (p<0.005). Conclusion: The use of 4% silane can produce the highest shear bond strength of porcelain and resin composite.

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