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Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi)
Published by Universitas Airlangga
ISSN : 19783728     EISSN : 24429740     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
The Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) (e-ISSN:2442-9740; p-ISSN:1978-3728) is published by the Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga. Its diciplinary focus is dental science and dental hygiene. The Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) is published in English on a quarterly basis with each 50-60 page edition containing between nine and eleven scientific articles on research, study literature and case studies. Contributors to the Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) included: dental researchers, dental practitioners, lecturers, and students drawn from Indonesia and a wide range of other countries.
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Articles 5 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 52, No 1 (2019): (March 2019)" : 5 Documents clear
The treatment of gingival recession with coronally advanced flap with platelet-rich fibrin Dewi, Asti Rosmala; Susanto, Agus; Rusyanti, Yanti
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 52, No 1 (2019): (March 2019)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v52.i1.p8-12

Abstract

Background: Of the various techniques developed for the treatment of gum recession, the current innovation in the use of platelet rich plasma (PRF) has been applied to the treatment of root-end closure procedures. Purpose: This study analyzed the effect of the coronally advanced flap (CAF) in combination with platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) during treatment of gingival recession. Methods: This research constituted an experimental study incorporating a split-mouth design which was conducted on eight participants (with 16 recession defects) who were divided into two groups consisting of the CAF group with PRF and another CAF group without PRF. Clinical parameters consisting of gingival recession (GR), keratinized gingival width (KGW), recession width (RW) and clinical attachment level (CAL) were measured both before and 21 days after surgery). Results: The average differences between clinical parameters in the test group were as follows: GR (2.25 ± 0.27), KGW (1.81 ± 0.75), RW (3.44 ± 1.35), and CAL (2.56 ± 0.50); while in the control group they were as follows: GR (2.00 ± 0.71), KGW (1.94 ± 0.78), RW (3.50 ± 1.91) and CAL (2.00 ± 0.76). There were significant differences in the GR and CAL between the test and control groups (p ≤ 0.05). Conclusion: A combination of the CAF procedure and PRF was proven to be more effective in covering the GR and increasing the CAL.
The difference between porcelain and composite resin shear bond strength in the administration of 4% and 19.81% silane Widjiastuti, Ira; Junaedi, Dwina Rahmawati; Effendy, Ruslan
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 52, No 1 (2019): (March 2019)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v52.i1.p27-31

Abstract

Background: Damage to porcelain restorations such as fractures requires a repair that can be performed either directly or indirectly. Direct repair involves directly performing restoration of fractured porcelain with a composite resin application. This technique has more advantages than indirect repair because it requires no laboratory work and can be completed during a single visit. Silane, on the other hand, has been widely used and is reported to increase porcelain and composite resin attachments during the direct repair process. Purpose: This study aimed to determine the differences in shear bond strength between porcelain and composite resin during the administering of 4% and 19.81% silane. Methods: 27 porcelain samples were divided into three groups, namely: Group A - 4% silane, Group B - 19.81% silane and Group C - no silane, prior to the application of composite resin. Each sample was tested for shear bond strength by means of Autograph and fracture analysis performed through stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscope tests. Data analysis was subsequently performed using an ANOVA test. Results: There was a significant difference between the three groups with p=0.000 (p<0.005). The lowest bond strength was found in the group without silane, while the highest was in the group with 4% silane (p<0.005). Conclusion: The use of 4% silane can produce the highest shear bond strength of porcelain and resin composite.
Evaluation of orthodontic tooth movement by 3D micro-computed tomography (µ-CT) following caffeine administration Herniyati, H.; Harmono, Happy; Devi, Leliana Sandra; Hernawati, Sri
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 52, No 1 (2019): (March 2019)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v52.i1.p1-7

Abstract

Background: The compressive strength of orthodontic tooth movement will be distributed throughout the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, resulting in bone resorption on the pressure side and new bone formation on the tension side. Caffeine, a member of the methyl xanthine family, represents a widely-consumed psychoactive substance that can stimulate osteoclastogenesis through an increase in RANKL. A 3D Micro-Computed Tomography (µ-CT) x-ray device can be used to measure orthodontic tooth movement and changes in periodontal ligament width. Purpose: The purpose of this research was to analyze the effects of caffeine on the distal movement distance of two mandibular incisors using 3D µ-CT. Methods: The research subjects (guinea pigs) were randomly divided into four groups. Of the two control groups created, one received two weeks of treatment and the other three weeks. The members of these two control groups were subjected to orthodontic movement but received no caffeine. Meanwhile, the other two groups were treatment groups whose members also received either two or three weeks of treatment. In these two treatment groups, the subjects were subjected to orthodontic movement and received a 6 mg/500 BM dose of caffeine. The orthodontic movement of the subjects was induced by installing a band matrix and orthodontic bracket on each mandibular incisor to move distally by means of an open coil spring. Observations were then conducted on days 15 and 22 with µ-CT x-rays to measure the distal movement distance of the two mandibular incisors and the width of the periodontal ligament. Results: The administration of caffeine increased the tooth movement on day 15 (p<0.05) and day 22 (p<0.05). The increase in the tooth movement on day 22 was greater than that on day 15 (p<0.05). The width of the periodontal ligament on the pressure side of the treatment groups experienced greater narrowing than that of the control groups (p<0.05). Meanwhile, the width of periodontal ligament on the tension side of the treatment groups widened more than that of the control groups (p<0.05). Conclusion: µ-CT x-ray can be used to evaluate the extent of orthodontic movement in addition to the width of the mandibular incisor periodontal ligament during orthodontic tooth movement. Moreover, it has been established that the administering of caffeine can improve orthodontic tooth movement.
Effects of hydroxyapatite gypsum puger scaffold applied to rat alveolar bone sockets on osteoclasts, osteoblasts and the trabecular bone area Naini, Amiyatun; Sudiana, I Ketut; Rubianto, Mohammad; Kresnoadi, Utari; Latief, Faurier Dzar Eljabbar
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 52, No 1 (2019): (March 2019)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v52.i1.p13-17

Abstract

Background: Damage to bone tissue resulting from tooth extraction will cause alveolar bone resorption. Therefore, a material for preserving alveolar sockets capable of maintaining bone is required. Hydroxyapatite Gypsum Puger (HAGP) is a bio-ceramic material that can be used as an alternative material for alveolar socket preservation. The porous and rough surface of HAGP renders it a good medium for osteoblast cells to penetrate and attach themselves to. In general, bone mass is regulated through a remodeling process consisting of two phases, namely; bone formation by osteoblasts and bone resorption by osteoclasts. Purpose: This research aims to identify the effects of HAGP scaffold application on the number of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, as well as on the width of trabecular bone area in the alveolar sockets of rats. Methods: This research used Posttest Only Control Group Design. There were three research groups, namely: a group with 2.5% HAGP scaffold, a group with 5% HAGP scaffold and a group with 10% HAGP scaffold. The number of samples in each group was six. HAGP scaffold at concentrations of 2.5%, 5% and 10% was then mixed with PEG (Polyethylene Glycol). The Wistar rats were anesthetized intra-muscularly with 100 mg/ml of ketamine and 20 mg/ml of xylazine base at a ratio of 1:1 with a dose of 0.08-0.2 ml/kgBB. Extraction of the left mandibular incisor was performed before 0.1 ml preservation of HAGP scaffold + PEG material was introduced into the extraction sockets and suturing was performed. 7 days after preparation of the rat bone tissue, an Hematoxilin Eosin staining process was conducted in order that observation under a microscope could be performed. Results: There were significant differences in both the number of osteoclasts and osteoblasts between the 2.5% HAGP group, the 5% HAGP group and the 10% HAGP group (p = 0.000). Similarly, significant differences in the width of the trabecular bone area existed between the 5% HAGP group and the 10% HAGP group, as well as between the 2.5% HAGP group and the 10% HAGP group (p=0.000). In contrast, there was no significant difference in the width of the trabecular bone area between the 2.5% HAGP group and the 5% HAGP group. Conclusion: The application of HAGP scaffold can reduce osteoclasts, increase osteoblasts and extend the trabecular area in the alveolar bone sockets of rats.
Comparative in vitro study of the cytotoxicity of gelatine and alginate to human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells Hendrijantini, Nike
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 52, No 1 (2019): (March 2019)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v52.i1.p36-40

Abstract

Background: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and scaffold combination constitute a promising approach currently adopted for tissue engineering. Umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) are easily obtained and non-invasive. Gelatine and alginate constitute a biocompatible natural polymer scaffold. At present, a cytotoxicity comparison of gelatine and alginate to hUC-MSCs is not widely conducted Purpose: This study aimed to compare the cytotoxicity of gelatine and alginate in hUC-MSCs in vitro. Methods: Isolation and culture were performed on hUC-MSCs derived from healthy full-term neonates. Flow Cytometry CD90, CD105 and CD73 phenotype characterization was performed in passage 4. 3-(4,5-dimethythiazol- 2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay was performed to measure the cytotoxicity. The three sample groups were: (T1) hUC-MSCs with α-MEM (alpha-minimum essential medium) solution as control; (T2) hUC-MSCs with gelatine; (T3) hUC-MSCs with alginate Results: Flow cytometry of hUC-MSCs displayed positive CD90, CD105 and CD73 surface markers. Gelatine and alginate had no effect on the viability of hUC-MSCs and no statistically significant difference (p>0.05) of cytotoxicity between gelatine and alginate to hUC-MSCs. Conclusion: Gelatine and alginate proved to be non-toxic to hUC-MSCs in vitro.

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