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INDONESIA
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi)
Published by Universitas Airlangga
ISSN : 19783728     EISSN : 24429740     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
The Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) (e-ISSN:2442-9740; p-ISSN:1978-3728) is published by the Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga. Its diciplinary focus is dental science and dental hygiene. The Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) is published in English on a quarterly basis with each 50-60 page edition containing between nine and eleven scientific articles on research, study literature and case studies. Contributors to the Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) included: dental researchers, dental practitioners, lecturers, and students drawn from Indonesia and a wide range of other countries.
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Articles 4 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 51, No 4 (2018): (December 2018) Article in press" : 4 Documents clear
Antioxidant activity test of ethyl acetate fraction of binjai (Mangifera Caesia) leaf ethanol extract Khairiah, K.; Taufiqurrahman, Irham; Putri, Deby Kania Tri
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 51, No 4 (2018): (December 2018) Article in press
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v51.i4.p164-168

Abstract

Background: Binjai (Mangifera caesia) is a herb derived from South Kalimantan possessing antioxidant properties which promote wound healing inhibiting oxidation radicals. The natural antioxidants present in binjai leaves can be extracted by fractionation. Purpose: This study aimed to analyze the antioxidant activity of ethyl acetate fraction in 96% ethanol extract of binjai leaf. Methods: The study constituted a pure experimental study incorporating a post-test design with only random sampling technique consisting of two groups, namely; an ethyl acetate fraction as the treatment group and ascorbic acid as the positive control group. The leaves were treated in accordance with the soxhlet method and subsequently fractionated to extract ethyl acetate fraction. This was used to measure antioxidant activity with DPPH radical damping method using a UV-Vis spectrophotometer. A linear regression calculation was performed with a standard curve to quantify the IC50 value, before the ethyl acetate fraction underwent a qualitative test of secondary metabolite. Results: An independent t-test indicated significant differences between groups, an average value of IC50 in ascorbic acid of 13.812 ppm with 0.996 linearity and a fraction of ethyl acetate 38.526 ppm with a linearity of 0.999. In contrast, at this linearity value ascorbic acid and ethyl fraction acetate demonstrate a very high linear connection between concentration and inhibition. A secondary metabolite test conducted on the ethyl acetate fraction produced positive results for flavonoid, tannins, and phenol. Conclusion: Based on the IC50 parameters, the fraction of ethyl acetate in 96% ethanol extract of binjai leaf produces very strong antioxidant activity in the content of the compounds in the fraction, namely: flavonoid, tannins and phenol.
The difference between residual monomer dentin bonding HEMA and UDMA with acetone and ethanol solvent after binding to type I collagen Normayanti, N.; Soetojo, Adioro; Pribadi, Nirawati
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 51, No 4 (2018): (December 2018) Article in press
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v51.i4.p169-172

Abstract

Background: In caries and non-caries lesions involving dentine, it is necessary to provide dentine-bonding material to help improve retention between the composite resin and the tooth surface. Composite resin attachment to dentine is influenced by bonding polymerization reactions. In several studies, researchers found that polymerized monomers will experience volume shrinkage because not all will fully polymerize but, rather, become residual monomers that can cause post-operative pain. Purpose: This study aimed to identify the difference in the amount of residual monomers between HEMA- and UDMA-based dentin bonding materials with acetone and ethanol solvents after binding to type I collagen. Methods: Four groups featured in this study: HEMA with acetone solvent and type I collagen , HEMA with ethanol solvent and type I collagen , UDMA with acetone solvent and type I collagen and UDMA with ethanol solvent and type I collagen . All groups were checked by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to quantify the remaining amount of monomers. Results: The percentage of residual monomers of dentine bonding HEMA with acetone solvent and type I collagen was 10.69%, HEMA with ethanol solvent and type I collagen was 13.93%, UDMA with acetone solvent and type I collagen was 2.89% and UDMA with ethanol solvent and type I collagen was 7.48%. Conclusion: HEMA with ethanol solvent has the highest number of residual monomers, while UDMA with acetone solvent has the lowest.
The evaluation of mandibular bone density in chronic periodontitis models Arina, Yuliana Mahdiyah Da’at; Ferdiansyah, F.; Rubianto, Mohamad
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 51, No 4 (2018): (December 2018) Article in press
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v51.i4.p210-215

Abstract

Background: Bone density, an important factor in functional bone quality, can affect the success of implant osteointegration or orthodontic treatment. A number of studies report that chonic periodontitis constitutes one risk factor of osteoporosis characterized by low bone mineral density and that the mandible is susceptible to osteoporosis. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate mandibular bone density in animal subjects suffering from chronic periodontitis. Methods: 40 male Wistar rats were divided into four chronic periodontitis groups and four control groups (each group n=5). As chronic periodontitis models, the subjects were injected with 2×109 CFU/ml of Porphyromonas gingivalis in the sulcular gingiva, whereas control group members were injected with normal saline. After 2, 3, 4 and 6-week injection periods, the subjects were sacrificed and radiographic examination of the mandibular bone subsequently performed. Mandibular bone density was evaluated by histometric analysis. Results: The mandibular bone density in members of the chronic periodontitis group was significantly lower than those of the control group (p<0.05). The reduced mandibular bone density in the chronic periodontitis group was in line with the protracted bouts of periodontitis. Conclusion: Reduced mandibular bone density was found in the chronic periodontitis model. The longer the duration of a bout of chronic periodontitis, the greater the reduction in mandibular bone density.
A comparison between orthodontic model analysis using conventional methods and iModelAnalysis Indirayana, Vita Previa; Gayatri, Gita; Zenab, N. R. Yuliawati
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 51, No 4 (2018): (December 2018) Article in press
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v51.i4.p173-178

Abstract

Background: Model analysis constitutes an essential aspect of orthodontic diagnostic practice. Pavan has developed an application to simplify the mathematical calculations employed in orthodontic model analysis. Purpose: This study was conducted to obtain the differences in results and time periods of model analysis using conventional means and iModelAnalysis. Methods: The research represented a comparative analytic study. The populations comprised dental casts dating from 2014 in the Orthodontics Laboratory of Padjadjaran University. The samples comprised 31 dental casts which were subjected to a total sampling method consisting of two treatments; a conventional method calculation and one using iModelAnalysis. A normality test was conducted and processed using a paired t-test with α=0.05. Results: The means of arch length discrepancies were 1.64±2.63 mm and 1.37±3.07 mm for the conventional methods and 1.65±2.43mm and 1.42±3.04mm for iModelAnalysis. The results of a Bolton analysis for conventional methods were 78.05±2.69% and 91.93±1.29%, while those for iModelAnalysis were 77.91±2.70% and 91.96±2.13%. A Howes analysis of conventional methods produced a result of 45.56±2.83%, while for an iModelAnalysis one of 45.56±2.85%. Pont analysis for conventional methods was 39.35±0.04 mm and 49.17±2.55 mm, while for iModelAnalysis it was 39.35±0.07 mm and 49.19±2.57mm. The mean of the duration of analysis using conventional methods was 1703.81±56.46 seconds, while for iModelAnalysis it was 990.06±34.87 seconds. A normality test confirmed that the data was normally distributed (p>0.05). The results of a paired sample t-test with p>0.05 showed that there was no significant difference between the results of each analysis, while there was significant difference in the time period of analysis. Conclusion: There was no difference in the analysis results. However, there was difference in the time period of analysis between conventional methods and that of iModelAnalysis.

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