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Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi)
Published by Universitas Airlangga
ISSN : 19783728     EISSN : 24429740     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
The Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) (e-ISSN:2442-9740; p-ISSN:1978-3728) is published by the Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga. Its diciplinary focus is dental science and dental hygiene. The Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) is published in English on a quarterly basis with each 50-60 page edition containing between nine and eleven scientific articles on research, study literature and case studies. Contributors to the Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) included: dental researchers, dental practitioners, lecturers, and students drawn from Indonesia and a wide range of other countries.
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Articles 11 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 48, No 3 (2015): (September 2015)" : 11 Documents clear
Apoptosis of Rattus novergicus gingival fibroblasts caused by silver nano-particles gel exposure Widowati, Kharinna; Berniyanti, Titiek; Rahayu, Retno Pudji
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 48, No 3 (2015): (September 2015)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v48.i3.p135-138

Abstract

Background: The use of silver nanoparticle are growing, especially in medical science. It’s used in many concentration. In dentistry, it’s used to decrease halitosis, periodontal diseases, and wound healing. It can affect the viability of the cells, give bad effects to the human’s health and environment if used in a long duration and in certain concentration. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to learn the apoptosis of gingival fibroblasts in Rattus novergicus which is exposed with 15 µg/ml silver nano-particle gel by the expression of caspase-3. Method: This study used 9 male wistar rats and were divided into 3 groups. Sample in group A were cut (hurt) in the oral gingiva and exposed to Ag-Np gel 15 µg/ml for 3 days. After 3 days, they were sacrificed and cut the gingival fibroblasts off 3x4 cm size with scalpel. Samples in group B were cut in the oral gingiva and exposed to Ag-Np Gel 15 µg/ml for 5 days. After 5 days they were sacrificed and the gingival fibroblasts off 3 x 4 cm with a scalpel. Samples in group C were cut in the oral gingiva and exposed to none for 3 days then cut the gingival fibroblasts off 3 x 4 cm size with scalpel. The expressions of caspase-3 in the apoptotic and wound healing process were analyzed by Immunohistochemical test. This data was analyzed by using the t-test method. Result: Mean expression numbers of caspase-3 in the group A=5.67; group B=11.33; and group C (control)=18.67. T-test sign.number of group A and C=0.009; group B & C=0.000. Conclusion: The exposure of 15 µg/ml silver gel nanoparticle to gingival fibroblasts of Rattus novergicus reduces the expressions of caspase-3 in the day-3 and day-5 post exposure. The amounts of cell death through the apoptotic pathway which were analyzed by the expressions of caspase-3 will decrease too.
Xerostomia severity difference between elderly using alcohol and non-alcohol containing mouthwash Susanto, Hendri
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 48, No 3 (2015): (September 2015)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v48.i3.p109-112

Abstract

Background: There are alcohol and non alcohol-containing mouthwash available in the market. Alcohol-containing mouthwash may have side effects which induced by alcohol in the mouthwash. Dry mouth/xerostomia may be a potential side effect of alcoholcontaining mouthwash when used by elderly person who has a tendency to have dry mouth. The evidence of  xerostomia induced by alcohol-containing mouthwash used by elderly is not available yet. Purpose: The aim of this study is to know the differences of xerostomia severity between elderly use alcohol-containing mouthwash and non alcohol-containing mouthwash. Method: This study was performed in elderly with age above sixty who do not have systemic diseases based on anamnesis, do not have oral diseases, and do not have allergy to one of  mouthwash components, do not use denture. Of total, thirty elderly participated in this study. The first group consists of elderly who use alcohol-containing mouthwash (AM) and the second group consists of elderly who use non alcoholcontaining mouthwash (NAM). Both groups use mouthwash for seven days (one week) twice a day. Xerostomia severity was assessed by VAS questionnaire. The mean score of the visual analogue score (VAS) xerostomia each group in day one (baseline) and day eight (post treatment) was analyzed by the Wilcoxon sign ranked test and Mann Whitney U test with 95% confidence level. Result: The VAS score of xerostomia post treatment (mean+SD/19.47+8.33) higher than baseline (mean+SD/15.87+8.91) in AM group (p<0.05), but, there is no significant difference of VAS score of xersotomia between post treatment (mean+SD/23.53+10.81) and baseline (mean+SD/23.67+11.82) in NAM group (p>0.05). The mean difference of VAS score of post-treatment and baseline between AM and NAM group was not significant (p>0.05). Conclusion: The conclusion is no significance difference of xerostomia severity between alcohol-containing mouthwash and non alcohol-containing mouthwash in elderly.
Autogenous tooth transplantation: an alternative to replace extracted tooth Kamadjaja, David B.
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 48, No 3 (2015): (September 2015)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v48.i3.p139-143

Abstract

Background: The gold standard treatment to replace missing tooth is dental implants, however, in certain cases, such as in young patients its placement is contraindicated. Autogenous tooth transplantation, which has been widely done in Scandinavian countries for many years, may become a good alternative to overcome this problem. Purpose: This article attempted to provide information about the indication, treatment planning, surgical technique and the successful result of autogenous tooth transplantation. Case: A fifteen year old male patient presented with large caries and periapical disease of his lower left first molar, which was partially erupted and the roots was not fully formed in radiograph. Case management: Autogenous tooth transplantation procedure was performed consisting of extraction of #36, odontectomy of #38 followed by its implantation to socket #36 and fixation of the transplanted tooth to the adjacent teeth. Post operative evaluation was done on regular basis within 18 months period. There was no complaint, the tooth was clinically stable and no evidence of periodontal problem. Serial radiographs showed healing of alveolar bone and periodontal tissue, and the complete root formation was evident by 18 months post operatively. Conclusion: Autogenous tooth transplantation is a potential alternative to replace extracted tooth. Provided that the case be properly planned and operation carefully performed, successful result of this treatment can be achieved.
Serum C-reactive protein and C-reactive gene (-717C>T) polymorphism are not associated with periodontitis in Indonesian male patients Suhartono, Antonius Winoto; Sulijaya, Benso; Djamal, Niniarty Zeiroeddin; Masulili, Sri Lelyati Chaidar; Talbot, Christopher; Auerkari, Elza Ibrahim
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 48, No 3 (2015): (September 2015)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v48.i3.p113-118

Abstract

Background: Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease caused by periodontal pathogens and influenced by multiple risk factors such as genetics, smoking habit, age and systemic diseases. The inflammatory cascade is characterized by the release of C-reactive protein (CRP). Periodontitis has been reported to have plausible links to increased level of CRP, which in turn has been associated to elevated risk of  cardiovascular disease (CVD). Purpose: The purpose of this study was t o investigate the relationship amongst the severity of periodontitis, CRP level in blood and CRP (-717 C>T) gene polymorphism in male Indonesian smokers and non-smokers. Method: The severity of periodontitis was assessed for 97 consenting male Indonesian smokers and non-smokers. The CRP level of the subjects was determined by using immuno-turbidimetric assay performed in PARAHITA Diagnostic Center Laboratory ISO 9001: 2000 Cert No. 15225/2. The rate of CRP (-717C>T) gene polymorphism was determined by using PCR-RFLP in Oral Biology Laboratory, Faculty of Dentistry, Universitas Indonesia. Result: The results suggest that the CRP protein level is not significantly associated with the tested CRP gene polymorphism (p>0.05). Also, while the severity of periodontitis increased significantly with subject age, the CRP level in blood serum was not significantly related to the severity of  periodontitis. The genotypes of the tested polymorphism did not show significant association with the severity of periodontitis either in smokers or in the combined population including smokers and non-smokers. The results naturally do not exclude such associations, but suggest that to discern the differences the sample size must be considerably increased. Conclusion: The CRP (-717C>T) gene polymorphism and CRP level in blood serum were not found to be associated with the severity of periodontitis in male smokers or in the combined population of smokers and non-smokers.
The effect of ethyl acetate fraction of Citrus limon peel on mesenchymal cell proliferation and polybacterial growth Marinna, Astrid; Hadi, Priyo; Radithia, Desiana
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 48, No 3 (2015): (September 2015)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v48.i3.p144-149

Abstract

Background: Oral diseases remain to be global health problem. The common therapy involved the use of modern medicines with their various side effects. Citrus limon are potentials as anti-inflammatory, anti-fungal, anti-oxidant, anti-viral and anti-bacterial. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of ethyl acetate fraction of citrus limon peel extract on human gingival mesenchymal cell proliferation and palm commensal polybacterial growth. Method: This study was experimental study with post test only control group design. Citrus limon peel extracted and partitioned in order to obtain ethyl acetate fraction of 3.125%, 2.75%, 2.375%, 2%, and 1.5625%. Toxicity test was performed after 24 hours using the MTT Assays. Cell viability was measured by optical density formazonand read by ELISA reader 620 nm. Results: All treatment groups showed less than 60% cell viability. The highest cell was 19.36 (1.5625% concentration) and the lowest was 12.65 (3.125% concentration). The highest anti-bacterial inhibition value was 8.9125 mm (3.125% concentration) and the lowest was 6.0625 mm (1.5625% concentration). Conclusion: The higher concentration of ethyl acetate fraction Citrus limon peel extract, the higher toxicity and inhibitory properties against commensal palm polybacteria.
Potential of Jatropha multifida sap against traumatic ulcer Gani, Basri A.; Nasution, Abdillah Imron; Nazaruddin, Nazaruddin; Sartika, Lidya; Alam, Rahmat Kurniawan
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 48, No 3 (2015): (September 2015)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v48.i3.p119-125

Abstract

Background: Traumatic ulcer is a lesion in oral mucosa as a result of physical and mechanical trauma, as well as changes in salivary pH. Jatropha multifida sap can act as antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and re-epithelialization, and can also trigger the healing process of ulcers. Purpose: Research was aimed to determine the potential of Jatropha multifida sap against traumatic ulcer base on clinical and histopathological healing process. Method: This research was conducted laboratory experimental model, with rats (Rattus norvegicus) as the subject as well as Jatropha multifida sap for ulcer healing. Those subjects were divided into four groups: two treatment groups administrated with pellet and Jatropha multifida sap, one group as the positive control group administrated with 0.1% triamcinolone acetonide, and one group as the negative control group administrated with 0.9% NaCl. Ulcer manipulation was used 30% H2O2, and evaluation of ulcer healing was used clinical and histopathological approach. Result: Clinically, the healing process of ulcers in the treatment group with Jatropha multifida sap was faster than that in the positive control group with 0.1% triamcinolone acetonide, indicated with the reduction of the ulcer size until the missing of the ulcers started from the third day to the seventh one (p≤0.05). Histopathologically inflammatory cells (lymphocytes, and plasma cells) declined started from the third day, and the formation of collagen and re-epithelialization then occurred. On the seventh day, the epithelial cells thickened, and the inflammatory cells infiltrated. Statistically, those groups were significant (p≤0.05). Conclusion: Jatropha multifida sap has a significant potential to cure traumatic ulcers on oral mucosa clinically and histopathologically.
The effect of 25% Mauli banana stem extract gel to increase the epithel thickness of wound healing process in oral mucosa Apriasari, Maharani Laillyza; Endariantari, Ariska; Oktaviyanti, Ika Kustiyah
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 48, No 3 (2015): (September 2015)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v48.i3.p150-153

Abstract

Background: Mauli banana is a special plant of South Borneo that can be used as alternatif medicine for wound healing wound healing. Recent studies showed that Mauli banana stem contained some compound such as flavonoid, saponin, and tannin that had antibacterial and antiinflamation effect, and can accelerate the wound healing. Purpose: This study was aimed to know the effect of 25% Mauli banana extract gel to the epithel thickness of wound healing process in oral mucosa. Method: It was the real experimental with post test only control group design. It used 36 Sprague dawley rats that divided into 3 groups: the negative control group by giving aquadest, the positive control group by giving drug contain Aloe vera, and the treatment group by giving 25% ethanol extract of Mauli banana stem. Biopsy was done on day 3, 5, 7 and the preparat was made to measure the thickness of oral mucosa epithel by Image J software. Result: The result showed that 25% ethanol extract of Mauli banana stem can increased the thickness of oral mucosa epithel on third day (51.26 µm), fifth days (108.49 µm), and seventh day (170.66 µm). The top thickness of mucosa epithel was on the seventh day. Two-ways Anova and Post Hoc LSD (p<0.05) showed the significant different between aquadest and 25% ethanol extract of Mauli banana stem. 25% ethanol extract of Mauli banana stem and drug contains Aloe vera are the aqual of meaningfull. Conclusion: 25%ethanol extract of Mauli banana can increase the epithelial thickness of wound healing procces in oral mucosa.
Comparison between probiotic lozenges and drinks towards periodontal status improvement of orthodontic patients Kohar, Natasia Melita; Emmanuel, Victor; Astuti, Luki
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 48, No 3 (2015): (September 2015)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v48.i3.p126-129

Abstract

Background: Fixed orthodontic appliances may interfere with daily oral hygiene procedure, causing more abundant plaque accumulation, therefore increasing the risk of periodontal disease. Probiotic methods represent a breakthrough approach in maintaining oral health and preventing periodontal disease. Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the effect between probiotic lozenges containing Lactobacillus reuteri and probiotic drinks containing Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota towards periodontal status of orthodontic patients. Method: Fixed orthodontic patients (n=30) from Faculty of Dentistry, Trisakti University Dental Hospital were included in this clinical trial. Periodontal status consisting of Plaque Index (PlI), Interdental Hygiene Index (HYG), and Papillary Bleeding Index (PBI) were then recorded from each patient. All patients received the phase one of periodontal treatment, as well as plaque control instruction. The subjects (n=10/gp) were randomly assigned to one of three groups; control group; probiotic lozenges group (Biogaia®); and probiotic drinks group (Yakult®). For 14 days, the probiotic groups were instructed to use the probiotic. Periodontal index improvement (PlI, HYG, and PBI) was found in all groups after 14 days research periode. These indices were then analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis analysis test. Result: It was found that L. reuteri and L. casei strain Shirota may improve periodontal status in fixed orthodontic patients. The best results were obtained from probiotic lozenges group. However, the results were not statistically significant (p>0.05). Conclusion: It was concluded that probiotics consumption containing L. reuteri and L. casei strain Shirota may slightly improve periodontal status in fixed orthodontic patients.
Experimental comparative study and fracture resistance simulation with irrigation solution of 0.2% chitosan, 2.5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA Ernani, Ernani; Abidin, Tri Murni; Indra, Indra
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 48, No 3 (2015): (September 2015)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v48.i3.p154-158

Abstract

Background: Preparation in endodontic need irrigation materials as root canal debridement and disinfectant. However, irrigation materials is one of the factors that influence the tendency of fracture. Purpose: This study was aimed to see the resistance and fracture distribution if teeth irrigated with high molecular horseshoe crab chitosan at 0.2% concentration, 2.5% NaOCl solution and 17% EDTA solution in endodontic treatment with finite element method (FEM) simulation study and experimental studies. Method: Endodontic treatment performed on 28 maxillary premolars with group A: irrigation solution of 17% EDTA and 2.5% NaOCl solution; group B: 2.5% NaOCl irrigation solution; group C: 2.5% NaOCl irrigation solution and 0.2% chitosan solution; group D: 0.2% chitosan solution irrigation. Final restoration was done using prefabricated glass fiber post. Cementation of post using resin cement then restored with direct composite resin restorations. Pressure test was performed with a Universal Testing Machine with a speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture occurred. A three dimensional finite element analysis was performed for total deformation, equivalent (von-mises) stress, and equivalent elastic strains. Result: Anova test showed significant differences in fracture resistance (p<0.05) in stroke difference between four groups. Based on the results of the analysis of post-hoc Bonferroni test and LSD, fracture resistance was significantly different between group A (1038.4±201.6) with group C (1515.6±243.3). Kruskal-Wallis test showed no significant difference in the distribution of fractures among the four groups (p>0.05). Statistical analysis showed no significant difference (p>0.05) between the results of experiment and FEM analysis results using the t-test. Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrated that there was effect of the use of high molecular 0.2% chitosan as a combined irrigation with NaOCl, but did not affect the fracture pattern distribution of endodontically treated teeth both experimentally and FEM analysis test.
Correlation between magnesium and alkaline phosphatase from gingival crevicular fluid periodontal diseases Kasuma, Nila
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 48, No 3 (2015): (September 2015)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v48.i3.p130-134

Abstract

Background: Magnesium is one of the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) cofactor. The amount of magnesium contained infoods affect ALP activity. Increased ALP activity will indicate the level of inflammation in periodontal disease. Elevated inflammation in periodontal disease will change gingivitis to periodontitis, where there has been damage to the bone ssupporting the teeth, and an increasing number of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF). The content of GCF consists of enzymatic and non-enzymatic. Changes in the composition of GCF occurs when the inflammation gets worse. Purpose: This study was aimed to prove the correlation between magnesium and ALP from GCF on periodontal disease. Method: This research involved 60 Minangkabaunese people with 20 healthy samples, 20 mild gingivitis samples, and 20 mild periodontitis samples. GCF was collected by absorbing method. Then ALP level in GCF was measured by using ELISA technique. Magnesium level in Minangkabaunese food was tested by Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ).Univariate analysis was performed to describe each variable. To see a normal distribution, Kolmogorov Smirnof Test was used (p>0.05). Unpaired T-test and Pearson correlation test was used to see correlation between ALP and magnesium level in Minangkabaunese food. Result: There is a significant correlation between the levels of ALP and magnesium level in Minangkabaunese food with periodontal disease (p=0.005). ALP is higest on mild periodontitis (137.74±23.01 ng/dl). Magnesium level normal control group is highest (250.14±32.34 mg) and in mild periodontitis is the lowest (110.83±21.04 mg). Corelation between ALP and magnesium level indicates strong correlation with negative direction (r=- 0.907). Conclusion: There is correlation between the levels of alkaline phosphatase and magnesium level on periodontal disease. Increasing inflamation rate will elevate the ALP level.

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