cover
Contact Name
Saka Winias
Contact Email
saka.winias@gmail.com
Phone
-
Journal Mail Official
dental_journal@yahoo.com
Editorial Address
-
Location
Kota surabaya,
Jawa timur
INDONESIA
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi)
Published by Universitas Airlangga
ISSN : 19783728     EISSN : 24429740     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
The Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) (e-ISSN:2442-9740; p-ISSN:1978-3728) is published by the Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga. Its diciplinary focus is dental science and dental hygiene. The Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) is published in English on a quarterly basis with each 50-60 page edition containing between nine and eleven scientific articles on research, study literature and case studies. Contributors to the Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) included: dental researchers, dental practitioners, lecturers, and students drawn from Indonesia and a wide range of other countries.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 11 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 48, No 2 (2015): (June 2015)" : 11 Documents clear
The role of ubiquinone supplementation on osteogenesis of nonvascularized autogenous bone graft Taufiqurrahman, Irham; Harijadi, Achmad; Simanjuntak, Roberto M.; D, Coen Pramono; Istiati, Istiati
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 48, No 2 (2015): (June 2015)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v48.i2.p59-63

Abstract

Background: Ubiquinone is one of food supplement which is known have positive effect in wound healing. However the study to evaluate the possible role of ubiquinone in bone healing in autogenous bone grafting after mandibular resection has not been studied. An in vitro study is required to evaluate whether ubiquinone or coenzyme Q-10 (CoQ10) has a positive effect on osteogenesis. Viability test of CoQ10 and a model of osteogenic-induced and hypoxic-condition mesenchymal stem cell culture were established to support the study. Purpose: The study was made to evaluate the role of ubiquinone in osteogenesis by analyzing the toxicity effect and the optimal dose of CoQ10 that might interfere in bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell (BM-MSC) that was dose in cell culture medium. The BM-MSC culture under hypoxia condition were also observed. Method: The toxicity and the optimum viability concentration of ubiquinone were observed using MTT assay. The osteogenic differentiation under hypoxic condition was done on BM-MSC in osteogenic medium that composed of ascorbic acid, glycerolphosphate and dexamethasone in hypoxia chamber for 21 days. Osteogenic differentiation and cellular hypoxia features were tested with immunocytochemical staining using anti-Runx2 and anti-HIF1α monoclonal antibody, respectively. Result: The maximum density value of  1.826 was found in the group of ubiquinone concentration of 75μM/ml, increasing of in concentration of ubiquinone resulted with the decrease ofoptical density of CoQ10. Statistic analysis using Anova showed with no significant difference among groups with various concentration. Immunocytochemical staining showed that Runx2 expression in 3% hypoxia group (p<0.05). Conclusion:Ubiquinone was found non toxic in its optimum dose of 75μM/ml, showed by optimum result in the expression ofRunx2 and HIF1α further study is necessary to evaluate the angiogenic and osteogenic effect ofubiquione.
Fungal inhibitory effect of Citrus Limon peel essential oil on Candida albicans Hernawan, Iwan; Radithia, Desiana; Hadi, Priyo; Ernawati, Diah Savitri
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 48, No 2 (2015): (June 2015)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v48.i2.p84-88

Abstract

Background: Oral candidiasis is an opportunistic infections due to Candida albicans that often found in people with HIV/AIDS. Anti-fungi, polyne and azole, are used in the treatment of oral candidiasis, but often cause persistence and recurrence. Citrus Limon peel contains terpenoids capable of inhibiting the synthesis of ergosterol, a component of the fungal cell wall that helps to maintain cell membrane permeability. Essential oil derived from citrus limon peel, thus, is expected to inhibit the growth of Candida albicans. Purpose: This research was aimed to know how essential oil derived from citrus Limon peel can inhibit the growth of Candida albicans. Method: This research was a laboratory experimental research carried out in three phases. First, essential oil was made with cold pressing method, and then the concentration of 100% was diluted to 50%, 12.5%, 6.25%, 3.125%, 1.56% and 0.78%. A test was conducted on the culture of Candida albicans in Sabouraud broth, accompanied by control (+) and (-). Second, the dilution of essential oil was conducted to alter the concentration with inhibitory power, from the strongest one to the weakest one, and then it was tested on the culture of Candida albicans. Third, spreading was carried out from liquid culture to agar media in order to measure the number of colonies. Result: Candida albicans did not grow on media with 100% essential oil treatment, but it grew on media with 50% essential oil treatment. In the second phase, dilution of 100%, 90%, 80%, 70%, 60% and 50% was conducted. The growth of Candida albicans was found on the treatment media of 60% and 50%. On the agar media, the growth occurred in the cultured medium treated with 70%. Conclusion: The minimum inhibitory power of essential oil derived from citrus Limon peel against Candida albicans was in the concentration of 80%. Essential oil derived from citrus Limon peel has antifungal effect and potential as a therapeutic agent for oral candidiasis.
Expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 after using chitosan gel with different molecular weight on wound healing process of dental extraction Sularsih, Sularsih; Wahjuningsih, Endah
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 48, No 2 (2015): (June 2015)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v48.i2.p53-58

Abstract

Background: Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) is bone stimulator which capable of inducing differentiation of mesenchymal cells into osteoblast, stimulating bone formation in wound healing process of dental extraction. Chitosan is polymer composed N-acetylD-glucosamine unit that has been used in various applications in wound healing process and bone tissue engineering. Purpose: The objective of this research was to analyzed expressions of BMP-2 for 7,14 and 21 days after using chitosan gel with different molecular weight on wound healing process of dental extraction. Method: The research was an experimental laboratory study. Rattus nornegicus strain wistar male, aged 8-16 weeks, divided into 3 treatment groups namely group 1 and II which given chitosan gel 1 % with high and low molecular weight and group III as control which were not given chitosan gel. Chitosan gel were applied into the socket of dental extraction. Rat was decaputated 7,14 and 21 days after chitosan gel application and the jaw in the treated regions and control group were cut for immunohistochemical examination to observe BMP-2. Data were analyzed using ANOVA test. Result: The result of this research showed significant differences on BMP-2 for 7,14 and 21 days observation (p<0,05). The increasing of BMP-2 were found in the group which given chitosan gel with high molecular weight. Conclusion: It may be concluded that chitosan gel with high molecular weight can enhance the expresion of BMP-2 on wound healing process ofdental extraction.
Expression analysis of CD63 in salivary neutrophils and the increased level of Streptococcus mutans in severe early childhood caries Luthfi, Muhammad
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 48, No 2 (2015): (June 2015)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v48.i2.p89-93

Abstract

Background: Severe early childhood caries (S-ECC) and decay exfoliation filling teeth (def-t) >6 is a destructive disease that afflicts teeth, including maxillary anterior teeth. In Indonesia, the prevalence of this disease is still high, for instance in Semarang 2007, the rate reached 90.5% in urban areas and 95.9% in rural areas for early childhood caries which is caused by Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). Neutrophils are effector cells of innate immunity which become the main component of the very first line of defense against microbes. Purpose: This study analyzed the effect caused by the change of CD63 expression on the surface of salivary neutrophils and the increased level of S. mutans in S-ECC. Method: This study employs observational analytic and cross sectional approach by using T test analysis technique for forty cases of early childhood that had been divided into two groups, first group of twenty children positively diagnosed as S-ECC and second group of twenty children negatively diagnosed as the control group. The sample’s result of gargling with 1.5% NaCl was used for neutrophils isolation and analysis function of salivary neutrophils phagocytosis by using flow cytometry test, while the sample of saliva was used to isolate S. mutans and calculate the level of S. mutans. Result: The expression of CD63+ salivary neutrophils in S-ECC was lower (2.32% ± 0.57) than in caries-free (2.67% ± 0.46), while the level of S. mutans showed that the level was not higher than in S-ECC (9.78 ± 2.22)x105 CFU/ml compared to in caries-free (5.13 ± 1.86)x105 CFU/ml. Conclusion: The low expression of CD63 in salivary neutrophils can lead to the increased level of S. mutans in S-ECC.
Expression of CD133 in various premalignant and proliferative lesions Amtha, Rahmi; Gunardi, Indrayadi; Sandra, Ferry; Ernawati, Diah Savitri
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 48, No 2 (2015): (June 2015)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v48.i2.p64-68

Abstract

Background: In Jakarta, oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) usually detected in late stage with very low survival rate ofabout 1.1 years. OSCC may be preceded by premalignant lesion, so that early detection of the lesion may decrease the mortality rate due to oral malignancy. CD133 is a hematopoietic stem cell that play role in tissue regeneration, inflammation and tumor. Upregulated of CD133 was reported on tumor progression. Purpose: The aim of study is to determine circulating CD133 expression on premalignant (PML) and proliferative (PL) lesion. Method: Observational research was carried out on patients who seek treatment of PML and PL at Oral Medicine clinic. CD133 was taken from peripheral blood serum, examined using PCR. Data was analyzed by Chi square test. Result: 15 subjects (each of five subjects for PML, PL and control) consist of 40% male and 60% female. Age group of above 41 years old was most affected PML and PL (66.7%). Tongue is common site for oral lesion (40%). There is a significant different of circulating CD133 rate among all groups lesion (p=0.039). Conclusion: CD133 express differently in premalignant and proliferative lesions.
The decrease of fibroblasts and fibroblast growth factor-2 expressions as a result of X-ray irradiation on the tooth extraction socket in Rattus novergicus Mahdani, Fatma Yasmin; Nirwana, Intan; Sunariani, Jenny
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 48, No 2 (2015): (June 2015)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v48.i2.p94-99

Abstract

Background: Wound healing involves cellular, molecular, physiological, and biochemical processes as responses to tissue damage. For instance, when a failure during tooth extraction occurs, radiographic examination, X-rays, is required. X-rays as an enforcer diagnosis can damage DNA chain, resulting in cell death and inhibition of wound healing process. Purpose: This research aims to analyze fibroblasts cell number and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) expressions during wound healing process after tooth extraction as a result of X-ray irradiation. Methods: There were three research groups, each consisting of ten rats. Incisor tooth extraction was performed on the left lower jaw, and then X-ray examination was conducted at certain irradiation doses, namely 0 mSv, 0.08 mSv, and 0.16 mSv. Those animals were sacrificed on day 3, and on day 7 after the extraction, histopathology and immunohistochemistry examinations were conducted to determine fibroblast cell number and FGF-2 expressions. Data obtained were then analyzed by oneway ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests. Results: The number of fibroblasts decreased significantly in the group with the irradiation dose of 0.16 mSv applied on day 7 after the extraction (p <0.05). Similarly, the number of FGF-2 expressions decreased significantly in the group with the irradiation dose of 0.16 mSv applied on days 3 and 7 after the extraction (p <0.05). Conclusion: X-ray irradiation at a dose of 0.16 mSv can inhibit the healing process of tooth extraction wound due to the decreasing of fibroblasts cell number and FGF-2 expressions.
The effects of Curcuma zedoaria oil on high blood sugar level and gingivitis Handajani, Juni; Narissi, Dhinintya Hyta
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 48, No 2 (2015): (June 2015)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v48.i2.p69-73

Abstract

Background: Hyperglycemia is a condition when blood sugar level is higher than normal. Hyperglycemia is also one of diabetes mellitus (DM) symptoms. Hyperglycemia has a correlation with the occurrence of periodontal disease. Curcuma zedoaria oil is known to decrease concentration of serum glucose. Purpose: This study was aimed to determine the effects of Curcuma zedoaria oil on high blood sugar level and gingivitis in rats. Method: This study used twenty-five male Wistar rats, divided into two groups, namely the treatment group and the control group. In the treatment group, fifteen rats were divided into three subgroups (each of which was induced with 10 μl/ml, 30 μl/ml and 50 μl/ml of Curcuma zedoaria oil). The control group was consisted often rats, divided into two subgroups, as the positive control group (induced with 10 mg/kg of Glibenclamide) and the negative control group (induced with propylene glycol). Streptozotocin (STZ) (Naclai tesque, Kyoto Japan) with a dose of 40 mg/kg was used to create hyperglycemia condition in those rats. Gingivitis was then made by using silk ligature in those hyperglycemia rats. Silk ligature was twisted at the margin of gingiva anterior mandibular incisors for seven days. After the rats had gingivitis, Curcuma zedoaria oil, glibenclamide and propylene glycol were orally administered for seven days. Their gingivitis condition was observed, and their blood sugar level was measured before and after the induction of STZ and during the treatment. The data obtained were analyzed by using Manova. Result: There were significant differences of blood sugar levels between the treatment group before and after the administration of Curcuma zedoaria oil and the positive control group (p<0.05). Healthy gingiva was then found in the treatment group and the positive control group. Conclusion: Curcuma zedoaria oil can decrease blood sugar level and gingivitis.
The effects of golden sea cucumber extract (Stichopus hermanii) on the number of lymphocytes during the healing process of traumatic ulcer on wistar rat’s oral mucous Arundina, Ira; Yuliati, Yuliati; Soesilawati, Pratiwi; Damaiyanti, Dian W; Maharani, Dania
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 48, No 2 (2015): (June 2015)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v48.i2.p100-103

Abstract

Background: Indonesia is a country with the world’s biggest potential and producer of sea cucumbers. Golden sea cucumber contains glicosaminoglycans, such as heparan sulphate and chondroitin sulphate, which could have a positive implication on wound healing process. This acceleration of wound healing process could be observed through the increasing of lymphocytes on ulcus traumaticus. Purpose: This study aims to analyze the effects of golden sea cucumber extract on the number of lymphocytes during the healing process of traumatic ulcer on Wistar rat’s oral mucous. Method: Golden sea cucumber extrat was made with freeze-dried method, and then gel was prepared using PEG 400 and PEG 4000 solvent. Twenty male rats with mucosal ulcus made were divided into a control group and three treatment groups with 20%, 40% and 80% golden sea cucumber extracts. All samples were euthanized on day 4 and then a preparation for histopathological examination was made to examine the number of lymphocytes. Result: The biggest number of lymphocytes was found in the treatment group with 40% golden sea cucumber extract, while the lowest one was found in the control group. The results of one way Anova test then showed a significant difference between the control group and the treatment groups. And, the results of Tukey HSD showed a significant difference between the control group and the treatment group with 40% golden sea cucumber extract. Conclusion: It can be concluded that 40% golden sea cucumber (Stichopus hermanii) extract can increase the number of lymphocytes during the healing process of traumatic ulcer on Wistar rat’s oral mucous.
Micronucleus frequency in exfoliated buccal cells from hairdresser who expose to hair products Yee, Koh Hui; Jonarta, Alma Linggar; Tandelilin, Regina TC.
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 48, No 2 (2015): (June 2015)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v48.i2.p74-79

Abstract

Background: Hairdresser is one of the fastest growing occupations in today’s society. Hairdresser help styling, cutting, colouring, perming, curling, straightening hair and various treatment to customer. Somehow, hairdresser are constantly exposed to chemical substances such as aromatic amines, hydrogen peroxide, thioglycolic acid, formaldehyde in hair products which can cause damage to human’s genome. Micronucleus is one of the effective biomarker for processes associated with the induction of DNA damage. Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the micronucleus frequencies in buccal mucosa epithelial cells of hairdresser who were exposed to chemical of hair products. Method: This study was conducted on twenty female subjects, who were divided into 2 groups: exposed and non-exposed (control) group. All subjects recruited were working in the same beauty salon. Buccal cells were obtained from each individual by using cytobrush. The cells were stained with modified Feulgen-Ronssenback method and counting of micronucleus per 1000 cell was done under light microscope. The data were analyzed using independent t-test and one-way Anova (p<0.05). Result: The result showed a significant difference in micronucleus frequency between 2 groups. There were a significantly increase of micronucleus frequency in hairdressers and increase of  micronucleus frequency with the longer duration of exposure. Conclusion: It concluded that the chemical substances of hair products had affected the micronucleus frequency ofthe epithelial cells in buccal mucosa of hairdressers.
The cleanliness differences of root canal irrigated with 0.002% saponin of mangosteen peel extract and 2.5% NaOCl Sakinah, Anis; Setyowati, Laksmiari; J, Devi Eka
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 48, No 2 (2015): (June 2015)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v48.i2.p104-107

Abstract

Background: Root canal treatment consists of preparation, sterilization, and obturation. During root canal preparation, debris is smeared over the dentinal surface forming a smear layer. Smear layer will reduce the attachment of root canal filling materials. Organic material in smear layer can be substrated for microorganism. Preparation of root canal should be followed by irrigation. NaOCl is common irrigation solution in endodontics. It has been very effective for their disinfecting and tissue-dissolving properties, but it is incapable of removing the smear layer. On the other hand, saponin of mangosteen peel extract has an ability as a surfactant to lower the surface tension, and it can dissolve debris containing of anorganic and organic materials. Purpose: This study aims to know the differences between 2.5% NaOCl and 0.002% saponin of mangosteen peel extract in removing the debris in the root canal after the preparation procedure. Method: Three groups of teeth (7 teeth in each) were instrumented with K-file and irrigated as follow: group 1 (control) with aquadest; group 2 with 2.5% NaOCl; and group 3 with 0.002% saponin of mangosteen peel extract. Furthermore, those teeth were split horizontally and longitudinally 4mm above the apical. The apical third of root canal walls was observed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Result: There were significant differences between each group (p<0.05). Median value of the group 3 was score 1 considered as the smallest value. It indicates that Group 3 with 0.002% saponin of mangosteen peel extract was the cleanest group. Conclusion:It can be concluded that 0.002% saponin of mangosteen peel extract can clean the smear layer of the root canal better than 2.5% NaOCl.

Page 1 of 2 | Total Record : 11


Filter by Year

2015 2015


Filter By Issues
All Issue Vol 52, No 2 (2019): (June 2019): Article in Press Vol 52, No 1 (2019): (March 2019) Vol 52, No 1 (2019): (March 2019) Vol 51, No 4 (2018): (December 2018) Vol 51, No 4 (2018): (December 2018) Article in press Vol 51, No 4 (2018): (December 2018) Vol 51, No 3 (2018): (September 2018) Vol 51, No 2 (2018): (June 2018) Vol 51, No 1 (2018): (March 2018) Vol 50, No 4 (2017): (December 2017) Vol 50, No 3 (2017): (September 2017) Vol 50, No 2 (2017): (June 2017) Vol 50, No 1 (2017): (March 2017) Vol 49, No 4 (2016): (December 2016) Vol 49, No 3 (2016): (September 2016) Vol 49, No 2 (2016): (June 2016) Vol 49, No 1 (2016): (March 2016) Vol 48, No 4 (2015): (December 2015) Vol 48, No 3 (2015): (September 2015) Vol 48, No 2 (2015): (June 2015) Vol 48, No 1 (2015): (March 2015) Vol 47, No 4 (2014): (December 2014) Vol 47, No 3 (2014): (September 2014) Vol 47, No 2 (2014): (June 2014) Vol 47, No 1 (2014): (March 2014) Vol 46, No 4 (2013): (December 2013) Vol 46, No 3 (2013): (September 2013) Vol 46, No 2 (2013): (June 2013) Vol 46, No 1 (2013): (March 2013) Vol 45, No 4 (2012): (December 2012) Vol 45, No 3 (2012): (September 2012) Vol 45, No 2 (2012): (June 2012) Vol 45, No 1 (2012): (March 2012) Vol 44, No 4 (2011): (December 2011) Vol 44, No 3 (2011): (September 2011) Vol 44, No 2 (2011): (June 2011) Vol 44, No 1 (2011): (March 2011) Vol 43, No 4 (2010): (December 2010) Vol 43, No 3 (2010): (September 2010) Vol 43, No 2 (2010): (June 2010) Vol 43, No 1 (2010): (March 2010) Vol 42, No 4 (2009): (December 2009) Vol 42, No 3 (2009): (September 2009) Vol 42, No 2 (2009): (June 2009) Vol 42, No 1 (2009): (March 2009) Vol 41, No 4 (2008): (December 2008) Vol 41, No 3 (2008): (September 2008) Vol 41, No 2 (2008): (June 2008) Vol 41, No 1 (2008): (March 2008) Vol 40, No 4 (2007): (December 2007) Vol 40, No 3 (2007): (September 2007) Vol 40, No 2 (2007): (June 2007) Vol 40, No 1 (2007): (March 2007) Vol 39, No 4 (2006): (December 2006) Vol 39, No 3 (2006): (September 2006) Vol 39, No 2 (2006): (June 2006) Vol 39, No 1 (2006): (March 2006) Vol 38, No 4 (2005): (December 2005) Vol 38, No 3 (2005): (September 2005) Vol 38, No 2 (2005): (June 2005) Vol 38, No 1 (2005): (March 2005) More Issue