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Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi)
Published by Universitas Airlangga
ISSN : 19783728     EISSN : 24429740     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
The Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) (e-ISSN:2442-9740; p-ISSN:1978-3728) is published by the Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga. Its diciplinary focus is dental science and dental hygiene. The Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) is published in English on a quarterly basis with each 50-60 page edition containing between nine and eleven scientific articles on research, study literature and case studies. Contributors to the Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) included: dental researchers, dental practitioners, lecturers, and students drawn from Indonesia and a wide range of other countries.
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Articles 11 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 41, No 3 (2008): (September 2008)" : 11 Documents clear
The effectiveness of 0.5–0.7% tetracycline gel to reduced subgingival plaque bacteria Setiawati, Ernie Maduratna
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 41, No 3 (2008): (September 2008)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v41.i3.p114-117

Abstract

Background: The tetracycline was an antimicrobial agent, that a broad spectrum. In addition to the antimicrobial effects, their efficacy was also anticollagenase and removal of the smear layer on the root surface. Purpose: The aim of the study was to evaluate effectiveness tetracycline gel 0.5–0.7% to reduction subgingival plaque bacteria. Method: A laboratory experimental study was conducted to investigate the effectiveness tetracycline gel 0.5–0.7%. Samples were divided into 5 groups with different concentration. The antimicrobial effect was performed using spectrophotometer. The statistical test was used One-Way ANOVA with significant difference 5% and subsequently Tukey-HSD test. Result: The study showed that tetracycline gel 0.5% has the highest antimicrobial has the highest antimicrobial effect. Conclusion: Tetracycline gel with 0.5% concentration is effective in inhibiting the growth of subgingival plaque bacteria.
Potential role of odontoblasts in the innate immune response of the dental pulp Haniastuti, Tetiana
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 41, No 3 (2008): (September 2008)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v41.i3.p142-146

Abstract

Background: Odontoblasts are the cells lining of tooth’s hard structure at the dentin-pulp border, which become the first cells encountered oral microorganisms entering dentin. However, they do not only form a physical barrier by producing dentin, but also provide an innate immune barrier for the tooth. Purpose: The aim of this review was to discuss the potential role of odontoblasts in the innate immune response of the dental pulp. Reviews: Recent studies have proven that odontoblasts express toll-like receptors, and capable of producing chemokines (i.e. IL-8, CCL2, CXCL2, and CXCL10), and cytokines (IL-1β and TNF-α) following lipopolysacharide exposure. Thereby odontoblasts are actively participating in the recruitment of immune cells in response to caries–derived bacterial products. Furthermore, odontoblasts also produce antimicrobial peptides (hBD-1, hBD-2, and hBD-3), and transform growth factor β that induce antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities. Conclusion: The presence of those innate immune molecules indicates that the nonspecific, natural, and rapidly acting defense may also be an important function of odontoblasts.
The profile of upper integument lip of Baduy and the nearby living Sundanese in South Banten, West Java, Indonesia Ardan, Rachman
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 41, No 3 (2008): (September 2008)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v41.i3.p118-122

Abstract

Background: Based on the Two Migration Theory and on cultural anthropology, the Baduy is classified as Protomalay and the Sundanese as Deuteromalay. Historically and socioculturally the Baduy is part of the Nearby Living Sundanese (NS) who has isolated themselves and settled down in Kanekes. Linguistics and archaeology could not tell whether the culture’s spread was due to a source population’s migrating or to a destination population’s copying the technology and language. Craniofacial anthropometry could resolve this because people’s physiognomy does not change rapidly due to mere migration. Purpose: The objective of this study is to determine whether the people of Baduy are Protomalay or Deuteromalay based on Profile of Upper Integument Lips (PUIL), which is the size of the angle formed by (sn-Ls) line to Frankfurt Horizontal Plane. Angle size < 90º = Procheili, 90º = Orthocheili, and > 90º = Opisthocheili. Lip prominence is strongly influenced by racial and ethnical characteristics, its form is determined especially by genetic factor. Method: Subject sample consisted of 43 Inner Baduys (IB); 92 Outer Baduys (OB); and 135 NS of South Banten were measured using Fasiogoniometer to determine PUIL. Average value data was determined and analyzed by Testing Equal Variances to compare two variances between groups. Result: The result of this study showed that IB, OB as well as NS are Mild Procheili (angle size = 50º–69.9º). PUIL of IB and OB compared to NS are slightly different, however, between IB and OB are similar. Conclusion: Based on the characteristic of PUIL, IB, OB, as well as NS, are classified as Mongoloid subrace, and physically should be classified as Deuteromalay.
The use of bay leaf (Eugenia polyantha Wight) in dentistry Sumono, Agus; SD, Agustin Wulan
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 41, No 3 (2008): (September 2008)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v41.i3.p147-150

Abstract

Background: Bay leaf or Eugenia polyantha Wight is a species that has several chemical properties. Bay leaf consists of tanine, flavonoid, essensial oil, including citric acid and eugenol. However, only few reports were published about the use of bay leaf in dentistry. Purpose: The aim of this article is to describe the chemical properties of Eugenia polyantha Wight that are widely used in dentistry. Reviews: The chemical properties of Eugenia polyantha Wight have analgesic, antibacterial, and anti-inflammatory effect, so they can be used as an alternative dental therapy. These properties can be used as a basic of therapy or as a basic ingredients of treatment. Conclusion: Eugenia polyantha Wight has some useful pharmacologic activities that are useful in dentistry. We suggest this article can be used as a basic knowledge for dental researchers.
Isolation and identification of java race amniotic membrane secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor gene Munadziroh, Elly
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 41, No 3 (2008): (September 2008)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v41.i3.p123-127

Abstract

Background: Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) has been found to facilitate epithelialization, maintain a normal epithelial phenotype, reduce inflammation, secrete growth factors such as IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, EGF, FGF, TGF, HGFand 2-microbulin. SLPI is serine protease inhibitor, which found in secretions such as whole saliva, seminal fluid, cervical mucus, synovial fluid, breast milk, tears, amniotic fluid and amniotic membrane. Impaired healing states are characterized by excessive proteolysis and oftenbacterial infection, leading to the hypothesis that SLPI may have a role in the healing process in oral inflammation and contributes to tissue repair in oral mucosa. The oral wound healing response is impaired in the SLPI sufficient mice since matrix synthesis and collagen deposition delayed. The objective of this research is to isolate and identify the amniotic membrane of Java Race SLPI Gene. Methods: SLPI RNA was isolated from Java Race amniotic membrane and the cDNA was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Result: Through sequence analyses, SLPI cDNA was 530 nucleotide in length with a predicted molecular mass about 12 kDa. The nucleotide sequence showed that human SLPI from sample was 98% identical with human SLPI from gene bank. PCR analysis revealed that the mRNA of SLPI was highly expressed in the amniotic membrane from Java Race sample. Conclusion: it is demonstrated that human SLPI are highly conserved in sequence content as compared to the human SLPI from gene.
Cytotoxicity test of 40, 50 and 60% citric acid as dentin conditioner by using MTT assay on culture cell line Khoswanto, Christian; Arijani, Ester; Soesilawati, Pratiwi
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 41, No 3 (2008): (September 2008)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v41.i3.p103-106

Abstract

Background: Open dentin is always covered by smear layer, therefore before restoration is performed, cavity or tooth which has been prepared should be clean from dirt. The researchers suggested that clean dentin surface would reach effective adhesion between resin and tooth structure, therefore dentin conditioner like citric acid was used to reach the condition. Even though citric acid is not strong acid but it can be very erosive to oral mucous. Several requirements should be fulfilled for dental product such as non toxic, non irritant, biocompatible and should not have negative effect against local, systemic or biological environment. Cytotoxicity test was apart of biomaterial evaluation and needed for standard screening. Purpose: This study was to know the cytotoxicity of 40, 50, 60% citric acid as dentin conditioner using MTT assay. Method: This study is an experimental research using the Post-Test Only Control Group Design. Six samples of each 40, 50 and 60% citric acid for citotoxicity test using MTT assay. The density of optic formazan indicated the number of living cells. All data were statistically analyzed by one way ANOVA. Result: The percentage of living cells in 40, 50 and 60% citric acid were 95.14%, 93.42% and 93.14%. Conclusion: Citric acid is non toxic and safe to be used as dentine conditioner.
The role of proper treatment of maxillary sinusitis in the healing of persistent oroantral fistula Kamadjaja, David B.
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 41, No 3 (2008): (September 2008)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v41.i3.p128-131

Abstract

Background: Oroantral communication (OAC) is one of the possible complications after extraction of the upper teeth. If not identified and treated properly, a large OAC may develop into oroantral fistula (OAF) which means that there is a permanent epithelium-lined communication between antrum and oral cavity. Such fistulas may cause ingress of microorganism from oral cavity into the antrum leading to maxillary sinusitis. Oroantral fistula usually persists if the infection in the maxillary antrum is not eliminated. Therefore, treatment of oroantral fistula should include management of maxillary sinusitis in which surgical closure of oroantral fistula should be done only when the sinusitis has been cured. Purpose: This case report emphasizes on the importance of proper management of maxillary sinusitis in the healing of oroantral fistula. Case: A case of an oroantral fistula following removal of upper left third molar is presented. As the maxillary sinusitis was not identified pre-operatively, two surgical procedures to close the fistula had ended up in dehiscence. Case management: The diagnosis of maxillary sinusitis was finally made and the sinusitis subsequently treated with combination of trans-alveolar sinus wash out, insertion of an acrylic splint, and two series of nasal and sinus physiotherapy procedures. The size of the defect decreased gradually during the treatment of the sinusitis and finally closed up without any further surgical intervention. Conclusion: This case report points out that it is important to detect intraoperatively an antral perforation after any surgery of the maxillary teeth and to close any oroantral communication as early as possible and that it is important to treat properly any pre-existing maxillary sinusitis before any surgical method is done to close the fistula.
Cytotoxicity of 5% Tamarindus indica extract and 3% hydrogen peroxide as root canal irrigation Wulandari, Erawati
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 41, No 3 (2008): (September 2008)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v41.i3.p107-109

Abstract

Background: Preparation of root canal is an important stage in endodontic treatment. During conducting preparation, it is always be followed with root canal irrigation that has aim to clean root canal from necrotic tissue remains, grind down dentin powder, micro organism, wet the root canal to make preparation process of root canal easier, and solute root canal content at area that can not be reached by equipment. Flesh of Tamarindus indica (pulpa tamarindorum) is used as traditional medicine and it contains vitamin C (antioxidant), protein, fat, glucose, etc. Previous research shows that 5% tamarindus indica extract can clean smear layer but it is more cytotoxicity to cell line BHK–21 than sterilized aquabides. Purpose: This research is to compare cytotoxicity between 5% Tamarindus indica extract with 3% H2O2 as root canal irrigation material. Method: Four teen culture cell line BHK 21 divides into 2 groups. Group 1 is treated with 3% H2O2 and Group 2 is treated with 5% Tamarindus indica extract, for about 2.5 minutes in every group. Then, living and death cell percentage is measured. Data is analyzed with independent t test with significant level of 0.05%. Result: The research showed that death cell in group 1 was 29.3% and in group 2 was 21.1%. There was a significant different (p < 0.05) between group 1 and group 2. Conclusion: Cytotoxicity of 5% Tamarindus indica extract to the cell line BHK–21 is lower than 3% H2O2.
The management of oral candidosis in diabetic patient with maxillary Herpes Zoster Harijanti, Kus; Setyaningtyas, Dwi; KS, Isidora
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 41, No 3 (2008): (September 2008)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v41.i3.p132-136

Abstract

Background: Oral candidosis is an infection caused by mainly Candida albicans. Candida species are common normal flora in the oral cavity and have been reported to be present in 40% to 60% of the population. Candida is predominantly an opportunistic infectious agent. Infection frequency has increased because of the presence of both local and systemic risk factors. The elderly age and diabetes mellitus may decrease the amount of saliva (xerostomia) and potentially increase the risk of colonization and secondary infection by Candida. Herpes Zoster (HZ) is a manifestation of the reactivation of latent varicella zoster virus. It is characterized by unilateral, painful, vesicular rash with a dermatomal distribution. The clinical manifestations of this disease can erupt to the skin and mucous membrane. If maxillary nerve is involved, the lesion can appear on unilateral facial skin and oral mucous membrane. Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report and discuss the difficulties in managing the oral candidosis in elderly patient (57 year old male) who suffered from maxillary Herpes Zoster and diabetes mellitus. Case management: At first, the patient was treated with 2% chlorhexidine gluconate and mycostatin oral suspension as topical antimycotic and reffered to dermathology clinic for viral infection treatment, however the oral candidosis did not improved. Subsequently, ketokonazole tablet was given three times daily for three weeks and regulated blood glucose level. In systemic antifungi (ketokonazole) treatment the oral candidosis disappeared. Conclusion: In this case, it is conclude that the management of oral candidosis are adequate, antiviral, blood glucose level regulating and systemic antifungal therapy.
Effect of various temperature and storage duration on setting time of OREGA sealer Sunarko, Bambang
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 41, No 3 (2008): (September 2008)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v41.i3.p110-113

Abstract

Background: Choosing the right rigid material and root canal paste are crucial in the success of root canal obturation. N2 is a root canal paste containing formaldehyde, which is toxic and carcinogenic. Whilst zinc oxide, resorcin, eugenol, glycerin, and hydrochloric acid, abbreviated as OREGA, are considered a safer root canal paste. In order to perform good obturation, root canal paste’s setting time plays an important role. This is connected with how long and in what temperature the paste’s substances are stored. Purpose: This experiment was performed to find out the effect of various temperature and storage duration on the setting time of OREGA sealer. Method: OREGA and N 2sealers were used as samples. Eighty sealer samples were produced for both sealers providing 10 samples foe each testing category. Each of these samples were stored in 27°C room temperature, 4°C refrigerator temperature, and put into storage for the duration of 0, 1, 2, and 3 months. After these treatments, the samples were tested and analyzed. Result: Data collected were analyzed by two-way ANOVA, showing no significant difference of the setting time among temperature and storage duration (p> 0.05). Conclusion: Temperature and storage duration do not affect the setting time of OREGA root canal paste.

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