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Forum Geografi
Indonesian Journal of Spatial and Regional Analysis
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An Exploration of Food Insecurity, Poverty, Livelihood and Local Food Potentials in Kulon Progo Regency, Indonesia

Widiyanto, Dodi

Forum Geografi Vol 32, No 1 (2018): July 2018
Publisher : Universitas Muhammadiyah Surakarta

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Abstract

Kulon Progo has been struggled to cope with the issues of poverty and food insecurity. The provincial and local governments pay a lot of attention to tackling these deprivation problems. The BKPP DIY developed a composite index which concluded that poverty is the primary cause of the deprivation. Therefore, this paper aims to explore the rural deprivation in Kulon Progo by assessing its aspects including poverty, food insecurity conditions, livelihoods, and local food potentials. Several methods, including typology, livelihood calculation, and resource possibility mapping are introduced for the preliminary analysis of this deprivation. The findings show that in Kulon Progo, (1) most of the deprived areas are located in the typology of upland region, (2) based on its of five assets, in general, the livelihood condition in Kulon Progo needs an improvement on financial, natural, and physical capitals, and (3) presenting the local food clusters based on its local food plantation area and production, so that these findings could give alternatives for the decision makers to develop the rural (deprived) areas.

Land Subsidence Analysis of Reclaimed Land using Time-Lapse Microgravity Anomaly in Manado, Indonesia

Wibowo, Sandy Nur Eko, Mamuaya, Gybert E., Djamaluddin, Rignolda

Forum Geografi Vol 32, No 1 (2018): July 2018
Publisher : Universitas Muhammadiyah Surakarta

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Abstract

Coastal area land reclamation is a policy with various benefits, including its potential to increase economic growth. However, reclamation also potentially has adverse impacts on the environment, including increasing pressure on biodiversity, natural resources and natural ecosystems, and the most common problem is land subsidence. This study uses time-lapse microgravity anomaly to ascertain the distribution of gravity and vertical gradient anomaly in order to map the subsidence characteristics occurring in the Manado reclamation area. From the research that has been previously conducted, the positive gravity anomaly is spread around Megamall-Multimart to the north of Monaco Bay and on the southern side of Manado Town Square (Mantos). Positive anomaly values range from 3 to 29.7 μGal. The negative anomaly values are scattered around the Mantos and Megamas separating bridge and at some points around the Whiz Prime Hotel, Menora Church and towards the Pohon Kasih Megamas area. The reclaimed areas generally experience subsidence accompanied by a reduction in groundwater mass (Megamall and Mantos) due to the use of the groundwater by the community in these areas. Uplifts also occur at some points in the reclamation area of Megamas as a result of the occurrence of land subsidence. Longer-term research is needed to determine whether there is an increase in the rate of land subsidence in the Manado reclamation area. Over a longer period of time it can also be established whether there are other factors which affect land subsidence. Other geodetic methods to monitor subsidence, such as levelling, InSAR and GPS survey, which have been conducted in other locations, are also needed to obtain more detailed information about the land subsidence in this area.

Distribution of Accuracy of TRMM Daily Rainfall in Makassar Strait

Giarno, G, Hadi, Muhammad Pramono, Suprayogi, Slamet, Murti, Sigit Heru

Forum Geografi Vol 32, No 1 (2018): July 2018
Publisher : Universitas Muhammadiyah Surakarta

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Abstract

This research aims to evaluate rainfall estimates of satellite products in regions that have high variations of rainfall pattern. The surrounding area of Makassar Strait have chosen because of its distinctive rainfall pattern between the eastern and western parts of the Makassar Strait. For this purpose, spatial distribution of Pearson’s coefficient correlation and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) is used to evaluate accuracy of rainfall in the eastern part of Kalimantan Island and the western part of Sulawesi Island. Moreover, we also used the contingency table to complete the parameter accuracy of the TRMM rainfall estimates. The results show that the performance of TRMM rainfall estimates varies depending on space and time. Overall, the coefficient correlation between TRMM and rain observed from no correlation was -0.06 and 0.78 from strong correlation. The best correlation is on the eastern coast of South West Sulawesi located in line with the Java Sea. While, no variation in the correlation was related to flatland such as Kalimantan Island. On the other hand, in the mountain region, the correlation of TRMM rainfall estimates and observed rainfall tend to decrease. The RMSE distribution in this region depends on the accumulation of daily rainfall. RMSE tends to be high where there are higher fluctuations of fluctuating rainfall in a location. From contingency indicators, we found that the TRMM rainfall estimates were overestimate. Generally, the absence of rainfall during the dry season contributes to improving TRMM rainfall estimates by raising accuracy (ACC) in the contingency table.

Exploring Typology of Residents Staying in Disaster-Prone Areas: A Case Study in Tambak Lorok, Semarang, Indonesia

Amin, Choirul, Sukamdi, S, Rijanta, R

Forum Geografi Vol 32, No 1 (2018): July 2018
Publisher : Universitas Muhammadiyah Surakarta

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Abstract

Studies about population immobility, especially immobility associated with climate change-related disaster, are very limited. As a consequence, the explanation of population immobility in disaster prone areas is still blurred. This study contributes in explaining population immobility by exploring the typology of residents who did not move from disaster-prone areas. The survey was conducted towards the residents of Kampung Tambak Lorok Semarang, which is prone to three disasters simultaneously i.e. sea level rise, land subsidence, and tidal inundation. The study sample was 235 heads of households selected using proportional sampling area technique. Data were collected using a questionnaire consisting of two parts: (1) demographic, social, and economic characteristics of people who did not move from disaster prone areas; and (2) staying intention in disaster prone areas. Data analysis used descriptive analysis by using table and graph of respondent characteristic and relation between respondent characteristic and staying intention in research area. Three (3) typologies have been identified, namely: Type-1 are residents who wishes to stay; Type-2 are residents who still have not decided whether to stay or move; and Type-3 are residents who do not want to stay/want to move. Each of these typologies is described by place of birth, age, length of stay, education, occupation, and income. The understanding of the typology of residents living in disaster prone areas is important as inputs for policy-makers, especially regarding the relocation of people from disaster prone areas to be effective. The results of this study also contribute empirical evidence to the migration theory debate at the micro level, namely that the staying intention is a key element in the black box of immobile decision-making from disaster prone areas.

Hydrogeology of Karang Mumus Watershed in Samarinda, East Kalimantan Province, Indonesia

Devy, Shalaho Dina

Forum Geografi Vol 32, No 1 (2018): July 2018
Publisher : Universitas Muhammadiyah Surakarta

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Abstract

Samarinda is part of an anticlinorium, which is marked by the existence of many anticlines. In addition, various types of rock and aquifer can be found in the city due to the uniqueness of geological structure of the area. Nevertheless, the literature are lacking attention of hydrogeological condition of this area. This research aims to determine the hydrogeology of the Karang Mumus watershed, particularly in relation to its geology and land use conditions. The research uses an inductive method, with an analytical approach consisting of a study of the land use, hydrological conditions, geology, geomorphology and hydrogeology. The Karang Mumus watershed can be divided into three hydrogeological layers: (1) an aquitard layer, the top layer, which has a hydraulic conductivity of 4.3 × 10-6 m/sec, and is dominated by siltstone; (2) an aquifer layer in the middle, with a hydraulic conductivity of 2.6 × 10-4 m/sec, dominated by sand and sandstone; and (3) an aquiclude layer occupying the lower layer, with a hydraulic conductivity of 1.6 × 10-11 m/sec, and which is dominated by claystone.

Developing an Extraction Method of Urban Built-Up Area Based on Remote Sensing Imagery Transformation Index

Hidayati, Iswari Nur, Suharyadi, R, Danoedoro, Projo

Forum Geografi Vol 32, No 1 (2018): July 2018
Publisher : Universitas Muhammadiyah Surakarta

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Abstract

Studying urban areas using remote sensing imagery has become a challenge, both visually and digitally. Supervised classification, one of the digital classification approaches to differentiate between built-up and non-built-up area, used to be leading in digital studies of urban area. Then the next generation uses index transformation for automatic urban data extraction. The extraction of urban built-up land can be automatically done with NDBI although it has one limitation on separating built-up land and bare land. The previous studies provide opportunities for further research to increase the accuracy of the extraction, particularly using index transformation. This study aims to obtain the maximum accuracy of the extraction by merging several indices including NDBI, NDVI, MNDWI, NDWI, and SAVI. The merging of the indices is using four stages: merging of two indices, three indices, four indexes and five indices. Several operations were experimented to merge the indices, either by addition, subtraction, or multiplication. The results show that merging NDBI and MNDWI produce the highest accuracy of 90.30% either by multiplication (overlay) or reduction. Application of SAVI, NDBI, and NDWI also gives a good effect for extracting urban built-up areas and has 85.72% mapping accuracy.

The Role of Vegetation in Controlling Air Temperature Resulting from Urban Heat Island

Rushayati, Siti Badriyah, Shamila, Annisa Dyra, Prasetyo, Lilik Budi

Forum Geografi Vol 32, No 1 (2018): July 2018
Publisher : Universitas Muhammadiyah Surakarta

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Abstract

Urban Heat Island (UHI) is a phenomenon exhibited by many worldwide cities. Cities, which exhibit UHI, possess higher air temperature as compared with air temperature in the surrounding areas. However, existing UHI profiles are those occurring in subtropical areas which are, of course, very much different from those in tropical cities. Therefore, the objectives of this study are to describe the UHI’s profile and the role of tree vegetation in controlling and reducing air temperature in a tropical region’s urban areas and, particularly, in DKI Jakarta. In this study, we carried out a spatial analysis of land cover and the distribution of air temperature. In this regard, we based our analysis of the potency of tree vegetation in reducing air temperature in UHI’s profile on the distribution of air temperature in various types of land cover which extended from north to south and from east to west. The ranges of air temperature in land cover in the form of built-up areas were 29.2-39.5 ⁰C, non-tree vegetation 28.6-35.6 ⁰C, and tree vegetation 27.0-35.7 ⁰C. Accordingly, tree vegetation has the highest potential to reduce air temperature and to overcome the phenomenon of UHI.

Suitability of Seagrass Ecosystem for Marine Ecotourism in Padang City, West Sumatera Province

Tanto, Try Al, Putra, Aprizon, Hermon, Dedi, Damanhuri, Harfiandri

Forum Geografi Vol 32, No 1 (2018): July 2018
Publisher : Universitas Muhammadiyah Surakarta

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Abstract

Seagrass ecosystems are exciting parts of the tropical coastal region that are potential for ecotourism activities. Marine ecotourism sector in the city of Padang has begun to develop within last few years. This development has not only positive impacts but also negative threats to the environment. Therefore, carefully select the most suitable areas for this purpose is important. This article aims to propose the potential areas for seagrass ecotourism in Padang city based on Geographic information system (GIS) analysis. We used spatial analysis to develop the seagrass ecotourism suitability index that is also potentially applicable to other areas. The results of the analysis show that area of the seagrass ecosystem in Nirwana beach (23.75 ha), Cindakir beach (2.56 ha), and Pasumpahan island (5.46 ha) with a total area of the seagrass ecosystem overall in Padang City (31.78 ha). These areas have been overgrown by Thalassia hemprichii with coverage >50 – 75 % in Nirwana beach, 25 – 50 % in Cindakir beach and Pasumpahan Island. The suitable areas for seagrass ecotourism were found on the beach of Nirwana (covers 84% as very suitable), Cindakir beach (covers 73 % as moderately suitable) and Pasumpahan island (covers 78 % as moderately suitable). We found that activities of local communities decreased the suitability of Cindakir beach and Pasumpahan island because these activities increase the abundance of mud in the substrate of waters.

Acknowledgement for Reviewers in 2017

Forum Geografi, Editors

Forum Geografi Vol 31, No 2 (2017): December 2017
Publisher : Universitas Muhammadiyah Surakarta

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Abstract

Inclusive Development through Providing Vertical Housing for Low Income Family in Yogyakarta Urban Areas

Rachmawati, Rini, Budiarti, Charina Vertinia, Febrita, Diana, Sulistyani, Estin

Forum Geografi Vol 31, No 2 (2017): December 2017
Publisher : Universitas Muhammadiyah Surakarta

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Abstract

Inclusive development is meant to accommodate the marginalised people, most of whom are the poor with the problem of fulfilling their need for housing. The government has tried hard to meet the need of housing by constructing rusunawa. This paper is aimed at describing the provision and uses of rusunawa, both in cities and peri-urban area by studying the cases in the City of Yogyakarta, Sleman Regency, and Bantul Regency. The study was conducted by doing observation and both structured and in-depth interviews. The research results show that rusunawa were viewed as one solution to help a low-income family in fulfilling their need for housing. In some cases in the City of Yogyakarta, rusunawa plays an essential role in preventing the settlement along both sides of rivers from becoming slum areas. Rusunawa in both Regencies of Sleman and Bantul is located near the city, so it is easy for the settlers to get to their workplace. The construction of rusunawa has also paid attention to the disabled by providing exceptional facilities. The same case is providing a playground for children and facilities for early education for young kids. However, there have not been special facilities for the elderly and pregnant women.

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