Journal of Degraded and Mining Lands Management
Published by Universitas Brawijaya
ISSN : 2339076X     EISSN : 25022458
Journal of Degraded and Mining Lands Management is managed by the International Research Centre for the Management of Degraded and Mining Lands (IRC-MEDMIND), research collaboration between Brawijaya University, Mataram University, Massey University, and Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences-China Papers dealing with result of original research, and critical reviews on aspects directed to the management of degraded and mining lands covering topography of a landscape, soil and water quality, biogeochemistry, ecosystem structure and function, and environmental, economic, social and health impacts are welcome with no page charge
Articles 204 Documents
Clay and organic matter applications on the coarse quartzy tailing material and the sorghum growth on the post tin mining at Bangka Island

Nurcholis, M, Wijayani, A, Widodo, A

Journal of Degraded and Mining Lands Management Vol 1, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : University of Brawjiaya

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | | DOI: 10.15243/jdmlm.2013.011.027

Abstract

Artisanal mining on the island ofBangkaleaves a lot of damaged landsurfacecoveredbycoarse-sized tailings that are dominatedby thequartz mineral and it causes soil to be extremely unfertile. The objective of the present research wastounderstand the impact of the clay and organic matter(OM) applications on the tailingsforsupportingthe growth of anadaptiveplant whichis usedinthe present studyissorghum. Thestudywas conducted on the artisanal mine closure land at Pangkalpinang, theclaymaterial andcow dung were collected fromlocally near location. Land was preparedby constructingfour treatments, i.e.: control, OM + NPK, clay + OM,andclay + OM + NPK. The amendment materialswereapplied by mixing the tailing on the 30 cm wide and depth on eachplantingstripwith a distance of70 cm. Sorghumseedswere plantedwith a spacingof 20 cm. Wateringplants was done byutilizingthe waterpitat the beginning ofgerminationand plant growth. The results showed thatsorghumgrownandsurvivedonlyonemonthinthe control treatment. Sorghumgrowthis verygoodon the treatment ofclay+OM+NPK, while the othertwo treatmentsresult instuntedgrowth ofsorghum. <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 1 Accent 3"

The potential use of indigenous nickel hyperaccumulators for small-scale mining in The Philippines

Fernando, E S, Quimado, M O, Trinidad, L C, Doronila, A I

Journal of Degraded and Mining Lands Management Vol 1, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : University of Brawjiaya

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | | DOI: 10.15243/jdmlm.2013.011.021

Abstract

Uptake of nickel and three other heavy metals (copper, cobalt, and chromium) was examined in 33 species of the common and rare native vascular plants growing in an ultramafic area currently subjected to mining in Zambales Province, Luzon, Philippines. Leaf tissue samples were initially screened in the field using filter paper impregnated with dimethylglyoxime (1% solution in 70% ethyl alcohol) and later analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. One species was found to be a hypernickelophore (>10,000 µg/g), eight species were nickel hyperaccumulators (>1,000 µg/g), nineteen species were hemi-accumulators (>100-1,000 µg/g), and five species were non-accumulators (<100 µg/g). This paper significantly adds to the list of hyperaccumulator species first reported for the Philippines in 1992. The findings will be discussed in context of using indigenous species for post mining ecological restoration and nickel phytoextraction in small-scale mining in the Philippines

Tolerance mechanisms in mercury-exposed Chromolaena odorata (l.f.) R.M. King et H. Robinson, a potential phytoremediator

Alcantara, H J P, Rivero, G C, Puzon, J M

Journal of Degraded and Mining Lands Management Vol 1, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : University of Brawjiaya

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | | DOI: 10.15243/jdmlm.2013.011.009

Abstract

Chromolaena odorata (L.f.) R.M. King et H. Robinson plants were grown in Hoagland’s solutions with 0.00 ppm and 1.00 ppm Hg(NO3)2. The calcium, magnesium, iron, and sulfur levels in the leaves were found to be not significantly affected by presence of the uptaken Hg2+. The chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, and total chlorophyll contents of its leaves also remained within normal levels, which may indicate that the photosynthetic machinery of the Hg-exposed C. odorata was unaffected by the presence of Hg2+. The results of the ICP-AES analyses of the Hg2+ contents established the presence of Hg2+ in all the subcellular components obtained from the leaves of the Hg-treated C. odorata plants, and that the ultimate localization of Hg2+ is in the vacuoles. The findings revealed no significant differences in the degree of oxidative injury between the cells from the control and Hg-treated plants, as evidenced by the low lipid peroxidation levels obtained with the TBARS assay. The SH-containing biomolecules that were initially detected through DTNB assay manifested a predominant peak in the RP-HPLC chromatographs of both the control and Hg-treated plants, with their retention times falling within the ranges of GSH, MT, and cysteine standards. However, the concentrations of the GSH- and/or MT-like, Cys-containing biomolecules detected in the leaves of Hg-treated C. odorata plants were ten times higher than those of the control.The findings of this study suggest that the enhanced antioxidative capacity, the production of Hg-binding biomolecules, and the localization of Hg2+ ions ultimately in the vacuoles of the leaves are the mechanisms which bring about Hg2+ tolerance and homeostasis in C. odorata plant. These results indicate that C. odorata is a potentially effective phytoremediator for Hg2+.

Thiosulphate assisted phytoextraction of mercury contaminated soils at the Wanshan Mercury Mining District, Southwest China

Wang, J, Feng, X, Anderson, C W N

Journal of Degraded and Mining Lands Management Vol 1, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : University of Brawjiaya

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | | DOI: 10.15243/jdmlm.2013.011.001

Abstract

Wanshan, known as the “Mercury Capital” of China, is located in the Southwest of China. Due to the extensive mining and smelting works in the Wanshan area, the local ecosystem has been serious contaminated with mercury. In the present study, a number of soil samples were taken from the Wanshan mercury mining area and the mercury fractionations in soils were analyzed using sequential extraction procedure technique. The obtained results showed that the dominate mercury fractions (represent 95% of total mercury) were residual and organic bound mercury. A field trial was conducted in a mercury polluted farmland at the Wanshan mercury mine. Four plant species Brassica juncea Czern. et Coss.var. ASKYC (ASKYC), Brassica juncea Czern. et Coss.var.DPDH (DPDH), Brassica juncea Czern. et Coss.var.CHBD(CHBD), Brassica juncea Czern. et Coss.var.LDZY (LDZY) were tested their ability to extract mercury from soil with thiosulphate amendment. The results indicated that the mercury concentration in the roots and shoots of the four plants were significantly increased with thiosulphate treatment. The mercury phytoextraction yield of ASKYC, DPDH, CHBD and LDZY were 92, 526, 294 and 129 g/ha, respectively.

Effect of traditional gold mining to surface water quality in Murung Raya District, Central Kalimantan Province

Wilopo, W, Resili, R, Putra, D P E

Journal of Degraded and Mining Lands Management Vol 1, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : University of Brawjiaya

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | | DOI: 10.15243/jdmlm.2013.011.033

Abstract

There are many locations for traditional gold mining in Indonesia. One of these is in Murung Raya District, Central Kalimantan Province. Mining activities involving the application of traditional gold processing technology have a high potential to pollute the environment, especially surface water. Therefore, this study aims to determine the impact of gold mining and processing on surface water quality around the mine site. Based on the results of field surveys and laboratory analysis, our data shows that the concentration of mercury (Hg) and Cyanide (CN) has reached 0.3 mg/L and 1.9 mg/L, respectively, in surface water. These values exceed the drinking water quality standards of Indonesia and WHO. Many people who live in the mining area use surface water for daily purposes including drinking, cooking, bathing and washing. This scenario is very dangerous because the effect of surface water contamination on human health cannot be immediately recognized or diagnosed. In our opinion the dissemination of knowledge regarding the treatment of gold mining wastewater is urgently required so that the quality of wastewater can be improved before it is discharged into the environment

Environmental stewardship for gold mining in tropical regions

Isahak, A, Surif, S, Sahani, M, Gill, A, Phang, J

Journal of Degraded and Mining Lands Management Vol 1, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : University of Brawjiaya

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | | DOI: 10.15243/jdmlm.2013.011.037

Abstract

Mining has gained strong popularity in recent years due to the increase in global demand for metals and other industrial raw material derived from the ground. However, information and good governance regarding activities related to mining is still very much lacking especially in underdeveloped and developing countries in the tropics. In Malaysia, the importance of environmental stewardship in mining is a new phenomenon. The new National Mineral Policy 2 calls for compliance with existing standards and guidelines, stresses on progressive and post mining rehabilitation as well as promotes the gathering and dissemination of information, best mining practices, public disclosure and corporate social responsibility. Our preliminary studies however have shown that its implementation may have been hampered by inadequate legal and administrative structures, lack of freedom of information, physical inaccessibility, lack of information and public participation. In this presentation, the above issues and measures to reduce the impact of mining, particularly that of gold on the environment with a special focus on Malaysia is discussed. These measures include alternative gold extraction methods, appropriate tailing dam construction and management, health risk assessment and risk management, compliance with the Cyanide Code and liberalization of access to information, facilitation of access to justice, the strengthening of legal and administrative structures as well as corporate accountability to the public as part of corporate social responsibility.

Phytoextraction to promote sustainable development

Anderson, C W N

Journal of Degraded and Mining Lands Management Vol 1, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : University of Brawjiaya

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | | DOI: 10.15243/jdmlm.2013.011.051

Abstract

Mining makes a positive contribution to the economy of Indonesia. Significant earnings accrue through the export of tin, coal, copper, nickel and gold. Of these commodities, gold carries the highest unit value. But not all gold mining is regulated. Indonesia has a significant Artisanal and Small Scale Gold Mining (ASGM) industry, defined as any informal and unregulated system of gold mining. These operations are often illegal, unsafe and are environmentally and socially destructive. New technology is needed to support the sustainable exploitation of gold and other precious metal resources in locations where ASGM is currently practised. This technology must be simple, cheap, easy to operate and financially rewarding. A proven option that needs to be promoted is phytoextraction. This is technology where plants are used to extract metals from waste rock, soil or water. These metals can subsequently be recovered from the plant in pure form, and sold or recycled. Gold phytoextraction is a commercially available technology, while international research has shown that phytoextraction will also work for mercury. In the context of ASGM operations, tailings could be contained in specific ‘farming areas’ and cropped using phytoextraction technology. The banning of ASGM operations is not practicable or viable. Poverty would likely become more extreme if a ban were enforced. Instead, new technology options are essential to promote the sustainable development of this industry. Phytoextraction would involve community and worker engagement, education and employment. New skills in agriculture created through application of the technology would be transferrable to the production of food, fibre and timber crops on land adjacent to the mining operations. Phytoextraction could therefore catalyse sustainable development in artisanal gold mining areas throughout Indonesia.

Effects of hedgerow systems on soil moisture and unsaturated hydraulics conductivity measured by the Libardi method

Prijono, S, Laksmana, M T S, Suprayogo, D

Journal of Degraded and Mining Lands Management Vol 3, No 2 (2016)
Publisher : University of Brawjiaya

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | | DOI: 10.15243/jdmlm.2016.032.491

Abstract

The hedgerow systems are the agroforestry practices suggesting any positive impacts and negative impacts on soil characteristics. This study evaluated the effects of hedgerows on the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of soil with the Libardi method approach. This study was conducted in North Lampung for 3 months on the hedgerow plots of  Peltophorum dassyrachis (P), Gliricidia sepium (G), and without hedgerow plot (K), with four replications. Each plot was watered as much as 150 liters of water until saturated, then the soil surface were covered with the plastic film. Observation of soil moisture content was done to a depth of 70 cm by the 10 cm intervals. Soil moisture content was measured using the Neutron probe that was calibrated to get the value of volumetric water content. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of soil was calculated by using the Libardi Equation. Data were tested using the analysis of variance, the least significant different test (LSD), Duncan Multiple Range Test (DMRT), correlation and regression analysis. The results showed that the hedgerow significantly affected the soil moisture content and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. Soil moisture content on the hedgerow plots was lower than the control plots. The value of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity in the hedgerow plots was higher than the control plots. Different types of hedgerows affected the soil moisture content and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. The positive correlation was found between the volumetric soil moisture content and the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of soil.

Mining waste contaminated lands: an uphill battle for improving crop productivity

Kumar, B M

Journal of Degraded and Mining Lands Management Vol 1, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : University of Brawjiaya

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | | DOI: 10.15243/jdmlm.2013.011.043

Abstract

Mining drastically alters the physico-chemical and biological environment of the landscape. Low organic matter content, unfavourable pH, low water holding capacity, salinity, coarse texture, compaction, siltation of water bodies due to wash off of mineral overburden dumps, inadequate supply of plant nutrients, accelerated erosion, acid generating materials, and mobilization of contaminated sediments into the aquatic environment are the principal constraints experienced in mining contaminated sites. A variety of approaches have been considered for reclaiming mine wastes including direct revegetation of amended waste materials, top soiling, and the use of capillary barriers. The simplest technology to improve crop productivity is the addition of organic amendments. Biosolids and animal manure can support revegetation, but its rapid decomposition especially in the wet tropics, necessitates repeated applications. Recalcitrant materials such as “biochars”, which improve soil properties on a long term basis as well as promote soil carbon sequestration, hold enormous promise. An eco-friendly and cost-effective Microbe Assisted Phytoremediation system has been proposed to increase biological productivity and fertility of mine spoil dumps. Agroforestry practices may enhance the nutrient status of degraded mine spoil lands (facilitation). N-fixing trees are important in this respect. Metal tolerant ecotypes of grasses and calcium-loving plants help restore lead, zinc, and copper mine tailings and gypsum mine spoils, respectively. Overall, an integrated strategy of introduction of metal tolerant plants, genetic engineering for enhanced synthesis and exudation of natural chelators into the rhizosphere, improvement of rhizosphere, and integrated management including agroforestry will be appropriate for reclaiming mining contaminated lands.

Lead and chromium removal from leachate using horsetail (Equisetum hyemale)

Kurniati, E, Imai, T, Higuchi, T, Sekine, M

Journal of Degraded and Mining Lands Management Vol 1, No 2 (2014)
Publisher : University of Brawjiaya

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | | DOI: 10.15243/jdmlm.2014.012.093

Abstract

Phytoremediation has been widely used for wastewater treatment technology. Horsetail was investigated for its capacity to remediate lead and chromium in leachate. This plant seemed to be an effective choice for phytoremediation due to its survival in extreme to moderate conditions, the availability of annual or perennial varieties and a deep root system. Conducted in a greenhouse, this research used leachate from final disposal. The leachate was exposed to six treated plants with three multiplications using activated natural zeolite media for one month. The treatments were flow system i.e. batch and continue, and living plants weight that is 0, 153 and 306 g planted in 20 cm diameter and 30 cm deep pots. The leachate pH, temperature, lead, and chromium concentration were observed and also the surrounding temperature and humidity. Results showed that 82.2% of lead can be removed by 153 gram horsetail on batch system as well as 61.2% chromium removal by 153 gram horsetail on continue system. Horsetail seemed to have future to be applied in phytoremediation of artisanal and small scale mining waste.

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