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INDONESIA
Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business
ISSN : 20858272     EISSN : 23385847     DOI : -
Core Subject : Economy,
Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business (JIEB) is open access, peer-reviewed journal whose objectives is to publish original research papers related to the Indonesian economy and business issues. This journal is also dedicated to disseminating the published articles freely for international academicians, researchers, practitioners, regulators, and public societies. The journal welcomes author from any institutional backgrounds and accepts rigorous empirical or theoretical research paper with any methods or approach that is relevant to the Indonesian economy and business content, as long as the research fits one of three salient disciplines: economics, business, or accounting.
Articles 5 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 34, No 1 (2019): January" : 5 Documents clear
DETERMINANTS OF BANK PROFITABILITY: THE CASE OF THE REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT BANK (BPD BANK) IN INDONESIA Herdhayinta, Heyvon; Supriyono, R.A.
Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business Vol 34, No 1 (2019): January
Publisher : Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (436.034 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/jieb.17331

Abstract

Introduction: The Regional Development Bank (BPD Bank) is expected to be a strong, highly competitive bank, which will contribute to the growth and even distribution of sustainable regional economies. Background Problem: A review by the Financial Service Authority (OJK) of the BPD Bank’s business growth indicates the low competitiveness of the BPD Bank, relative to other commercial banks. Novelty: Limited prior studies have been conducted on the profitability determinants of the BPD Bank, especially in Indonesia, and previous studies have only focused on the internal determinants of profitability. Hence, this research aims to analyze both the internal and external profitability determinants of the BPD Bank in Indonesia. Research Method: This study analyzes 135 observations in total from all 27 BPD banks in Indonesia for five years, from 2011 to 2015. This research measured bank profitability using ROA and ROE as the dependent variables. The independent variables are the internal and external determinants of bank profitability. The internal determinants of profitability consist of TA, TCORCAP, CAR, NPL, LDR, OE/OI and NIM; whilst the external determinants include TMS, INF and BIRATE. Findings: The findings of this study show that the profitability of the BPD Bank, as measured by its Return on Assets (ROA) and Return on Equity (ROE), is significantly determined internally by the total assets, LDR, OE/OI, and NIM and externally by the BIRATE and inflation. Those variables have positive relationships with profitability, except for OE/OI and inflation, which have negative relationships with profitability. In addition, two hypotheses are only partially supported, in which the total core capital and CAR show negative relationships only with ROE. Conclusion: The findings of this paper provide a deeper insight to help manage the profitability of the BPD Bank, which eventually can promote sustainable economic development.
TARIFF ELIMINATION UNDER THE TRANS-PACIFIC PARTNERSHIP AND ITS IMPACT ON INDONESIA’S TRADE BALANCE Sahu, Pritish Kumar
Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business Vol 34, No 1 (2019): January
Publisher : Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (24.748 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/jieb.28252

Abstract

Introduction: Indonesia has signed, and is in the process of signing, many bilateral and regional Free Trade Agreements (FTAs). Whether these trade agreements will benefit Indonesia on the economic front or not is still a matter for discussion. Background Problem: Signing TPP, raises many questions as to how this would affect the countries in Asian regions, including Indonesia. Novelty: Considering the criticism of CGE (Computer General Equilibrium) model, this paper uses the SMART simulation model, based on a partial equilibrium approach, to estimate the aggregate and commodity-level gains and losses for Indonesia with its partner countries during the post-tariff elimination period. Research Method: This study uses the World Bank’s World Integrated Trade Solution (WITS) Database. This database contains trade data for all the countries under a different nomenclature viz. at the two-digit, four-digit, and six-digit level. We use the HS-classified nomenclature at the six-digit level in order to estimate the impact of the removal of tariffs on Indonesia’s trade, i.e. both exports and imports. Findings: The finding reveals that if Indonesia does not take part in the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement, it will still have a trade surplus of $1.6 billion with the Trans-Pacific countries but joining the bloc would result in a trade deficit of $19 million. Joining the bloc would increase the imports from Japan, followed by the United States and Australia as against an increase in exports to the United States, followed by Malaysia and Vietnam. The post Trans-Pacific Partnership period will have many implications for Indonesia, it may face difficulties exporting to the member countries, even with an existing trade agreement, while in the long run the Trans-Pacific Partnership bloc could limit Indonesia’s trade prospects with these Pacific Rim countries and it may limit Indonesia influencing WTO outcomes. Conclusion: Trade agreements seem to have benefited Indonesia’s economy and its people in many ways over the years, even though it has an important cost for some people.
TEENS AND THE HANG OUT LIFESTYLE: WHAT DRIVES TEENS SATISFACTION AND ATTITUDINAL LOYALTY? Fitri ayuni, Risca
Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business Vol 34, No 1 (2019): January
Publisher : Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (786.962 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/jieb.28668

Abstract

Introduction: Satisfying teens consumer group is critical to retain a larger market share in the future. Creating teens’ experience and value seems to be fundamental for enhancing both satisfaction and loyalty in cafes industry. Background Problem: This study examines the impact of customers’ experiences and the hedonic quality on teenagers’ satisfaction and attitudinal loyalty. Novelty: This study provides a new and comprehensive model of customer experience by adding hedonic value as a subjective experience to evaluate satisfaction and attitudinal loyalty. Research Method: Questionnaires were used to collect the data. Purposive sampling was chosen to select the respondents. Two hundred Indonesian teens participated in this study. In order to achieve the aim of this study, SPSS 23 and Partial Least Square (PLS) 3 were used. Seven out of ten hypotheses proposed in the study were supported. Findings: Three dimensions of customer experience (staff interaction, customer interaction and physical environment) have a significant effect on customers’ satisfaction, but only one dimension (physical environment) has an effect on customers’ attitudinal loyalty. An additional finding of this research is that all the hedonic quality dimensions (except hedonic emotional) have an effect on customers’ satisfaction. Lastly, customers’ satisfaction has a significant effect toward customers’ attitudinal loyalty. Conclusion: The findings suggested that a cafe’s manager or owner should pay attention to their customers’ experiences and their hedonic quality, in order to create customer satisfaction and enhance their attitudinal loyalty toward the cafe.
ECONOMIC BEHAVIOR OF MICRO AND SMALL BUSINESS HOUSEHOLDS IN A BRANCHLESS BANKING SYSTEM Mangani, Ktut Silvanita; Syaukat, Yusman; Arifin, Bustanul; Tambunan, Mangara
Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business Vol 34, No 1 (2019): January
Publisher : Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (597.121 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/jieb.31493

Abstract

Introduction: This study aims to analyze how the existence of branchless banking in rural areas affects the economic behavior of the micro and small business households, and vice versa. Background Problem:  Within the framework at inclusive finance program, Indonesia has implemented the branchless banking model. However, the impact of the branchless banking system to micro and small business household has not discussed yet. Research Method: The research was conducted in Bogor District, with many remote villages adjacent to Jakarta, a capital city of Indonesia. A total of 97 samples of micro and small business households were selected from 13 sub-districts. The estimation was conducted using 2SLS method. The model describes the existing condition that explains the uniqueness of the economic behavior of the micro and small business households in a branchless banking system. Novelty: Studies related to branchless banking generally analyzed from the perspective of banking institutions. However, this study focusses on supply side, namely it analyzDe the household economic behavior using simultaneously equation model. Findings: The results show that the presence of branchless banking agents, as measured by the value of the transactions conducted by the households, have little effect on the economic behavior of the micro and small business households. On the other hand, the economic behavior variables which are expected to affect the value of the transactions do not occur. The results explain that the utilization of the banking services provided through agents in the branchless banking system is in the form of payment transactions. In addition, the presence of branchless banking in rural areas has not affected production activities and vice versa. Conclusion: This study suggests a further study to find out the factors that make business actors unwilling to perform financial transactions related to their production activities through branchless banking agents.
ACCOUNTABILITY PRESSURE AS DEBIASER FOR CONFIRMATION BIAS IN INFORMATION SEARCH AND TAX CONSULTANT’S RECOMMENDATIONS Misra, Fauzan -
Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business Vol 34, No 1 (2019): January
Publisher : Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (755.53 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/jieb.40019

Abstract

Introduction: This study examines the influence of accountability pressure toward information search behavior and the subsequent tax recommendation.  Background Problem: Prior research has shown that tax consultants are subject to confirmation bias during their information search when providing recommendations to their clients. Nevertheless, less attention has been given to identifying boundary condition or mitigating factors. This study proposes accountability pressure to mitigate such bias. Novelty: This study broadens the understanding of the effect of different accountability pressures on an individual’s effort and judgement making. Research Method: The research was conducted by an experimental approach using a 1x2 between-subjects design using an Internet-based instrument. Accountability pressure is manipulated into 2 levels (strong or weak). The experiment involved 82 tax professionals. Findings: The results show that accountability pressures influence the depth of the consultant information search. That is, a tax consultant those faced a high accountability pressure performed a deep search, while those who faced a weak accountability pressure conducted a shallow search. Then, a deep search leads to more conservative recommendations, while a shallow search leads to an aggressive recommendation. Furthermore, the results of interaction and simple effect tests show that the information search depth can mitigate confirmation bias occurred during information search processes. Conclusion: These findings imply that accountability within the organization needs to get more attention from tax consultants. While any prior research found that confirmation bias was proofed to have pervasive character and hard to be eliminated,  this study pointed out that the accountability pressure could mitigate such bias.

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