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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
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Articles 19 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 9, No 4 (2004)" : 19 Documents clear
Response of growth and digestive organs development of Pelung x Kampung crossbred chicken to dietary proteins Iskandar, Sofjan
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 9, No 4 (2004)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i4.430

Abstract

More information on the performance of local breed of chicken encourages more exploration on early digestive tract development of Pelung x Kampung cross chicken. One hundred and sixty day-old chicks (doc) of Pelung x Kampung crossbred were sexed and allocated to two different dietary proteins of 15 or 19% with the same level of dietary energy (2900 kcal/kg) and other nutrients according to levels suggested for light high breed chicken. Rations, in a form of mash, and water provided ad libitum during the 28 days of observation. Body weight and feed consumption were recorded weekly. Thirty-two day old chickens were sacrificed for digestive track analysis, then two chickens obtained from each trial replicate were also sacrificed at day 7, 14, 21 and 28, following at least 3 hours of starvation to clear the tract from remaining digesta. The cut organs (crop, proventriculus, gizzard, duodenum, jejunum, ileum and caecum) were separated and cleaned carefully from digesta with tissue paper prior to weighing. Number of birds in each cage was rearranged to keep the number relatively the same throughout the replicates every week after sacrificing. Higher body weight of young chicken to 19% dietary protein compared to 15% dietary protein was shown at 28 days of age. Gizzard, duodenum, jejunum and ileum developments of male chicks were significantly higher than that of females when the chicks reached the age of 28 day. Generally the relatif weight of duodenum and jejunum were relatively higher than the development of growth or development of other digestive organ segmens. Response of other observed parameters other than mentioned above to dietary protein nor sex were not significantly different at any other ages.   Key words: Pelung x Kampung crossbred chicken, growth, digestive organs developments, dietary proteins
Preservation of semi-liquid Aloe gel: total phenolic and emodin content Rakhmani, Susana I.W; Sitompul, S; Rosida, J; Purwadaria, T; Sinurat, A.P
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 9, No 4 (2004)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i4.431

Abstract

Semi liquid Aloe gel (LBSC) was preserved using sodium chloride (1, 2 and 3%) and sugar (10, 20 and 30%) for 7 weeks at 4ºC. Physical observations (color, odor and gas) and chemical analysis (total phenolic and emodin) were performed every week during preservation. Changing color was observed at the fourth week and until the seventh week. The total phenolic content decreased by 23.2, 12.9 and 19.0% in LBSC with 1, 2 and 3% salt respectively. The total phenolic content in LBSC with 10, 20 and 30% sugar decreased by 64.0, 53.8 and 30.4% respectively. The emodin content decreased by 60.7% for control (LBSC alone), but in LBSC with 1, 2 and 3% salt it was decreased by 26.2, 19.2 and 50.8% respectively. The emodin content in LBSC with 10, 20 and 30% sugar decreased by 70.5, 67.4 dan 82.4% respectively. Emodin was more unstable than total phenolic. Preservation using sugar was not preserve the availability of emodin, while salt could inhibit the decrease of emodin concentration in LBSC. Preservation of LBSC with 2% table salt gave the lowest decrease of emodin and total phenolic contentsKey words: Aloe vera, fenol, emodin, preservation
Study of effectiveness of bacteria isolated from rumen microbes with acetogen medium as methanogenesis inhibitor Thalib, Amlius; Widiawati, Y; Hamid, H
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 9, No 4 (2004)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i4.432

Abstract

Ruminal methanogenesis has disadvantageous effects on ruminant animals and environment of atmosphere. Inhibition of methane produced through reduction of carbondioxide has been conducted by bacteriological approach. The approach involved the isolation of bacteria from rumens of sheep (IBD) and buffalo (IBK) using medium for CO-utilizing acetogens. The isolate of bacterium was multiplied with the usual culture medium and then used as inoculum to degrade a substrate of King grass under constant temperature (390C) for 48 hours. Fresh rumen fluid of sheep (CRDS) was used as comparing inoculum. Measurementswere carbondioxide and methane gasses, pH, volatile fatty acid (VFA) and NH3-N contents, bacterial count, and dry matter digestibility (in vitro DMD). The data measured were analyzed by using completely randomized design. The results showed that morphological cell of IBD was oval pleomorphic with Gram negative type, and cell of IBK was rod with Gram negative type. Percentage of CH4 produced by inoculum of IBD was lower than CRDS but was not significantly different (29.47 vs. 33.07%), while the percentage of methane produced by inoculum of IBK was very significantly lower than CRDS (24.29 vs. 33.07%) (P<0.01). Acetate/propionate ratio as a result of substrate fermentation by inoculum of IBD (3.55) and IBK (3.79) were very significantly higher than that of CRDS (2.43) (P<0.01). It is concluded from this experiment that isolates used were effective to inhibit the methanogenesis and the species contained in the isolates were indicated to be homoacetogenic bacteria.   Key words: Bacterial isolate, acetogen medium, methanogenesis, inhibitor
Prolactin promoter gene as marker assisted selection (MAS) for the control of broodiness of Kampung chicken Sartika, Tike; Mansjoer, S.S; Saefuddin, A; Martojo, H
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 9, No 4 (2004)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i4.433

Abstract

Preliminary research about MAS (Marker Assisted Selection) was conducted to detect broodiness trait of Kampung chicken. MAS currently is very important in situations, where the accuracy of selection is low, such as, traits with low heritability, e.g. broodiness trait and egg production. Prolactin promoter was selected as a marker gene for broodiness because it plays a critical part in the neuroendocrine cascade which is triggered at the onset of broodiness. DNA samples were collected from low and highbroodiness samples on basic population (G0) each 24 samples, and from selected population (G3) each 28 samples. As control population without broody behavior was used 16 samples White Leghorn (WL) chicken. Prolactin promoter gene was amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR product was analyzed using electrophoresis agarose gel 2%. The results showed four types of bands represent in the Kampung chicken, three types called as wild type band and one type as the WL band. The chickens with low and high broodiness on G0 generation have 75 and 87.5% of wild type band while in the G3 generation was decreased to 25 and 75%. Conclusions of the research indicated that the selected breed of the Kampung chicken on G3 generation increased WL band like White Leghorn chicken as much as 31,25% from the G0 generation.   Key words: Kampung chicken, prolactin promoter, MAS
The influence of isobuthyl methylxhantine (IMX) and separation time on viability of spermatozoa and effectiveness of separation using egg albumin column Sianturi, R.G; Situmorang, P; Triwulanningsih, Elsa; Sugiarti, T; Kusumaningrum, D.A
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 9, No 4 (2004)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i4.434

Abstract

Supplementation of 3-isobuthyl-1-1-methylxanthine (IMX), as a cAMP inhibitor phosphodiesterase and could raise sperm motility, is expected to optimize the X and Y sperm separation. The purpose of this research was to observe the effect of IMX supplementation and separation time on the quality of separated sperm and the effectiveness of the method of sperm separation. Completely randomized design with 2 x 2 factorial was used in this research. The first factor was IMX (0.0 and 0.5 mM) while the second factor was separation time (10 and 30 minutes). The parameters observed were sperm concentration, the percentages of sperm motility, live sperm, sperm with intact apical ridge and the ratio of spermatozoa X and Y which measured by morfometric of head sperm square. IMX supplementation did not affect sperm concentration both on 10 or 30 minutes. The 30-minute separation time significantly reduced sperm motility in upper fraction while the addition of IMX significantly reduced sperm motility in lower fraction. There were no significant differences on the percentage of live sperm and sperm with intact apical ridge in every treatment even in upper or lower fraction. The albumin column sperm separation in this research changed the ratio of X and Y spermatozoa from 49.7% : 50.3% (fresh semen) to 65.1-84.0% : 16.0-34.9% in upper fraction; and to 24.0- 30.0% : 70.0-75.9% in lower fraction. The addition of IMX increased significantly X spermatozoa percentage (65.1 to 84.0%) and reduced significant Y-spermatozoa percentage (34.9% to 16.0%) in upper fraction. There was no significant differences on the ratio of X and Y spermatozoa between 10 and 30-minute of separation time treatment. In conclusion, the albumin column separation technique can be used to separate X and Y spermatozoa with the duration of 10 to 30 minutes separation time and did not severely affect the quality of separated sperm. The presence of IMX in separation media has no effect on the sperm separation effectiveness.   Key words: Sperm separation, isobuthyl methylxanthine, X and Y spermatozoa, albumin column
Extrahepatic bile duct ligation in broiler chickens: ultrastructural study of Ito cell Handharyani, Ekowati; Ochiai, K; Winarto, A
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 9, No 4 (2004)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i4.435

Abstract

The Ito cell (fat-storing cell) is a cell lying in perisinusoidal space of liver. The function of Ito cell is expanding from a site of fat-storing site to a center of extracellular matrix metabolism and mediator production in the liver. This study was performed in order to evaluate the Ito cells in cholestatic condition. The artificial cholestatic was conducted by ligation of extrahepatic bile ducts (bile duct ligation = BDL) in broilers. The results showed that BDL induced bile congestion, fibrosis, proliferation of Ito cells and intrahepatic bile ductules. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that Ito cells were scattered throughout the fibrotic areas, and larger in size with more extensive immunoreactivity than those in normal livers. Ultrastructural study demonstrated that Ito cells were closely associated with the production of extracellular collagen fibers. Ito cells actively react against hepatocytic injuries, especially in fibrogenesis of cholestatic livers.   Key words: Bile duct, ito cell, broiler
Antibody response in naïve and sensitised goats infested by Sarcoptes scabiei Tarigan, Simson
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 9, No 4 (2004)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i4.436

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to characterize the IgG and IgE antibody responses in goats infested repeatedly with Sarcoptes scabiei. Ten goats purchased from scabies-free farms were infested with 2000 live mites on the auricles. Fifty days after the initial infestation, the goats were treated with ivermectin. After being completely recovered, the goats were reinfested then treated again at 50 days post infestation. Blood samples were collected at the time of the first infestation, then every 10 days afterwards for 270 days. Seroconversion for IgG took place after 30 days following the first infestation, whereas the maximum level of the specific IgG antibodies occurred after 50 days. Immunoblot analysis identified a number of antigens (Mr 180, 135, 43 and 38 KDa) that recognised by the IgG at 10 days and continuously recognised throughout the course of the multiple infestations. Being consistently recognised, those antigens should be essential in the development immunological diagnostic tests for scabies. The levels of scabies-specific IgE antibodies increased slowly during the first infestation and rapidly dropped following treatment of the animals with ivermectin. In the second and third infestations, however, the reaginic antibodies rose rapidly and with a grater level. On immunoblot analysis, at least 10 antigens (Mr 130, 72, 64, 58, 48, 44, 41, 39, 27 and 25 KDa) were observed to be recognised by the IgE present in the sera from scabies-infested animals. Since IgE response is considered to play a major role in the immune protection, those allergens, therefore, could be used as the main component of an anti-scabies vaccine.   Key words: Sarcoptes scabiei, antibody, goats
Glasser’s disease in swine in Batam Island, Riau Province Priadi, Adin; Natalia, L; Poernomo, S
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 9, No 4 (2004)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i4.437

Abstract

Glasser’s disease or Haemophilus parasuis in swine causes a considerable economic losses. This disease decreases farm production due to high mortality. In a field investigation, H. parasuis serotype 12 was isolated from the lung of a ten week old post weaning pig suffering from pneumonia in Bulan island, Riau Province. The isolation of H. parasuis in a pig herd showing increasing mortality is the first reported in Indonesia. Antibiotic sensitivity test using disc diffusion methods, showed that the isolate was sensitive to bacitracin, baytril, erythromycin and was resistance to neomycin, kanamycin, doxycyclin, ampicillin and sulphamethoxazol-trimethoprim. Vaccination in weaned piglet using commercial inactivated vaccine was monitored using Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Crude extract of culture H. parasuis serotype 12 was used as the ELISA coating antigen. There was no significant immune response detected by ELISA 3 months after vaccination.   Key words: Glasser’s disease, swine, drug sensitivity, ELISA
icacy test of hexane extract of Annona squamosa L seeds for Chrysomya bezziana larvae growth in vitro Wardhana, April H; Widyastuti, E; Wiratmana, A.W.A; Muharsini, S; ., Darmono
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 9, No 4 (2004)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i4.438

Abstract

Chrysomya bezziana is primer agent causing myiasis in livestock and human throughout Africa to Asia. At present, treatment of myiasis using chemical synthetic insecticide causing environment and livestock production contaminations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of hexane extract of Annona squamosa L seed to kill C. bezziana as botanical insecticide. Three level and method preparation of larvae (L1, L2 and L3) were carried out. Meat blood mixture (MBM) and larval rearing media (LRM) were mixed with hexane extract of A. squamosa L seed and tested to 625 and 750 larvae (L1and L2 respectively), while for L3 625 larvae were soaked in the solution containing the hexane extract. This last preparation was carried out to observe the effect of toxic contact. Each larvae treatment was divided into 5 levels such as negative control using distillation water (PO), given 0.25% hexane extract (P I); 0.50% (P II); 0.75% (P III) and positive control was given with 0.10% Asuntol®. This assay was to know digest toxic effect of hexane extract of A. squamosa L seed for those larvae. Number of 625 instar III larvae (L3) was soaked in the solution containing the hexane extract of A. squamosa L seed for 10 second, placed into vermicullite and incubated on 36oC. This assay was to know contact toxic effect of them. All of larvae were allowed to become pupae. Parameters oberserve were number of larvae death, pupae weight and number of pupae become into fly. The data was analyzed using Anova (5%) and Z test (5%) then smallest significant difference test (BNT 5%). The results showed that 0.50% of hexane extract of A. squamosa L seed was able to decrease pupae weight for L1 and L2 and to cause fail pupae become fly (P<0.05). Instar III larvae (L3) soaked in PI until P III and not effect to pupae weight, pupae become fly and survival of adult flies (P>0.05).   Key words: Chrysomya bezziana, myasis, srikaya, A. squamosa L, in vitro
Effect of additional of microbial growth factors combined with and without microbe preparate on growth performance of Etawah-cross goat Thalib, Amlius
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 9, No 4 (2004)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i4.439

Abstract

Effect of microbial growth factors (FPM) combined with and without microbe preparate (SM) on growth of Etawah-cross goat has been conducted for 14 weeks, including 2 weeks of adaptation period. Animals used were 24 male goats of Etawahcross (PE) with a mean liveweight of 17.73 ± 1.80 kg. The animals were randomly distributed into 3 treatment groups. Each group consisted of 8 animals. All animals were fed elephant grass (ad lib.) + concentrate containing 16% crude protein (1.0% of live weight) as basal diet. The treatment groups were : I. Control (K); II. K + FPM; III. K + SM + FPM. Measurements recorded were: feed consumption, average daily gain (ADG), dry matter digestibility (in vitro and in vivo DMDs), as well as rumen ecosystem. All animals were placed in metabolism cages for 2 weeks for determination of in vivo DMD. The results showed tht FPM combined with and without SM improved the performance of both rumen ecosystem and host animals. Compared to control, combination of FPM with SM increased the following parameters significantly (P<0.05): ADG (55 vs. 36 g); DMI (645 vs. 609 g head-1 day-1); in vivo DMD (74 vs. 69%); FCR (12 vs. 17); in vitro DMD (49 vs. 46%); colony number of bacteria per cell number of protozoa (3.09 x 104 vs. 1.12 x 104); VFA content (3.53 vs. 2.82 mg ml-1); NH3-N content (68 vs. 56 mg l-1); pH (6.78 vs. 6.65). Microbe preparate enhanced the effect of FPM on VFA content so that the combination of FPM and SM (treatment III) significantly increased the VFA content as compared to the control (P<0.05).   Key words: Microbial growth factor, microbe preparate, etawah-cross goat

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