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Ahmadi Riyanto
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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
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Articles 10 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 9, No 3 (2004): SEPTEMBER 2004" : 10 Documents clear
Detection of avian influenza virus H5N1 subtype in organs of chicken affected by higly pathogenic avian infuenza in East and West Java by using immunohistochemical technique Damayanti, R; Dharmayanti, N.L.P.I; Indriani, R; Wiyono, A; ., Darminto
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 9, No 3 (2004): SEPTEMBER 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (310.53 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i3.409

Abstract

The study was conducted to detect antigen H5N1 of highly pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) virus in various farms in East and West Java. The immunohistochemical technique was applied due to Hematoxilin-eosin (H&E) staining was impossible to visualize the antigen in tissue. Immunohistochemical staining was applied for some visceral organs collected from the areas where the outbreaks occurred in September-October 2003. The specimens were processed as histopathological paraffin blocks using standard method. The blocks that were suspected to have antigen H5N1 were cut and rabbit antisera to H5N1 produced from the local isolate was applied as the primary antibody. Biotinylated secondary antibody and avidin biotin peroxidase from a commercial kit were administered. The antigen present in the tissues were visualized by adding a substrate called Amino Ethyl Carbazole (AEC) resulting in reddish brown colour. This immunostaining proved to be accurate and reliably quick method to detect H5N1 antigen present in the avian tissues. In conclusion, the outbreak of bird flu was caused by H5N1 strain and the antigen could be found in wattles, combs, brain, trachea, lungs, heart, proventriculus, liver, spleen, kidney and ovary.   Key words: Highly pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI), chicken, H5N1, outbreak, immunohistochemistry
In vitro study of effectiveness of saponin from Sapindus rarak fruit as methanogenesis inhibitor on ruminal digestion system Thalib, Amlius
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 9, No 3 (2004): SEPTEMBER 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (204.902 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i3.405

Abstract

Methane produced in the rumen system causes the lost of ingested chemical energy, and the methane emitted contributes the greenhouse effect to the atmosphere environment. A study to evaluate the effectiveness of saponin from Sapindus rarak fruit as an inhibitor of ruminal methanogenesis was conducted. The method conducted in this study was a fermentation of a substrate by in vitro technique using rumen fluid (obtained from fistulated sheep) as inoculum. Substrate (king grass) was fermented in anaerobic incubator system at pH of medium 6.9 and temperature of 39°C for 48 hours. Inoculum was supplemented with an ingredient obtained by extraction of Sapindus rarak fruit with methanol (Aksapon SR) and the ones without extraction (lerak powder), and further, these treatments were compared to other methanogenesis inhibitors (i.e. Fe3+, SO4 2– and poly unsaturated longchain fatty acids: PULCFA).The treatments were 1). Inoculum without treatment (K); 2). K + Aksapon SR (80 mg/100 ml); 3). K + lerak powder (160 mg/100 ml); 4). K + Fe3+ (0.8 mg/100 ml); 5. K + SO4 2- (96 mg/100 ml); 6). K + PULCFA (24 mg/100 ml). Measurements conducted were portion of methane, dry matter digestibility (DMD), NH3-N content, microbial population, and volatile fatty acids (VFA). The data measured were analyzed by using completely randomized design. The results of the experiment showed that Aksapon SR was the most effective inhibitor of methanogenesis compared to the others, that is when compared to control, Aksapon SR lowered methane production by 31% (P<0.01), and followed by treatments of Fe3+ (22%) (P<0.05), lerak powder (21%) (P<0.05), PULCFA (11%) (P>0.05) and SO4 2–(10%) (P>0.05). All additive treatments did not affect the DMD value of the substrate fermented by control inoculum. Compared to control, all treatments lowered the protozoal population where the Aksapon SR gave the strongest effect (1.91 x 105 vs 9.94 x 105 cell/ml), and the decrease of protozoal number in Aksapon SR treatment was followed by the increase of bacterial (4.13 x 109 vs 2.56 x 109 colony/ml). Aksapon SR and SO4 2- did not influence the total VFA production, while lower VFA productions were found on lerak powder and Fe3+ treatments (P<0.05), and the reverse effect was shown by PULCFA (P<0.05). Acetate/propionate ratio was significantly changed by Aksapon SR and lerak powder treatments (i.e. 1.37 and 1.33 respectively, vs 2.20). In conclusion, Aksapon SR was the most effective methanogenesis inhibitor compared to the others used in this study, and saponin contained in Sapindus rarak fruit could also be used as propionate enhancer.   Key words: Saponin, Sapindus rarak, methanogenesis, inhibitor
Detection of antibody responses by using haemagglutination inhibiton test and the protection titer of avian influenza virus H5N1 subtype Indriani, Risa; Dharmayanti, N.L.P.I; Wiyono, A; ., Darminto; Parede, L
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 9, No 3 (2004): SEPTEMBER 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (166.554 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i3.410

Abstract

Study on the detection of antibody responses using haemagglutination inhibition (HI) test and the protection titer to Avian influenza (AI) virus H5N1 subtype local isolate has been conducted at the Research Institute for Veterinary Science (RIVS). A total number of 50 village chicken (10 chicken served as un-injected controls) and 30 quail were injected intramuscularly with inactivated virus of AI H5N1 subtype local isolate. Serum samples were collected 3 weeks after injection and were tested using haemagglutination inhibition tests. The correlation between antibody titer and its protection to AI virus H5N1 local isolate were measured by challenging the birds with AI virus H5N1 local isolate The HI test was then used to determine field serum samples. A total number of 48 village chicken from three (3) Districts (Bekasi, Tangerang and Bogor) and 96 quails from two (2) farms in District of Sukabumi which were all vaccinated with commercial AI adjuvant vaccine were sampled. The study revealed that village chicken and quails showed antibody responses after 3 weeks vaccination and that titer of ≥ 3 log 2 was able to protect chicken and quails when they were challenged with local isolate virus. Based on this result, village chicken field samples from Districts of Tangerang, Bekasi and Bogor showed antibody titer which will protect 50, 100 and 85% of the flocks respectively. While quail field samples from Farm I and Farm II in District of Sukabumi showed antibody titer which will protect 60-100% and 0-80% of the flocks respectively. It is concluded that the study has successfully measured antibody titer to AI virus H5N1 subtype which protect village chicken and quails from local isolate virus challenge so that the results will be used to analyze field serum samples after vaccination program to eradicate AI from Indonesia.   Key words: Antibody responses, haemagglutination inhibition test, protection titer, AI virus H5N1subtype
Pasteurised milk and implementation of HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point) Murdiati, T.B; Priadi, A; Rachmawati, S; ., Yuningsih
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 9, No 3 (2004): SEPTEMBER 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (197.15 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i3.406

Abstract

The purpose of pasteurisation is to destroy pathogen bacteria without affecting the taste, flavor, and nutritional value. A study on the implementation of HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point) in producing pasteurized milk was carried out in four processing unit of pasteurised milk, one in Jakarta, two in Bandung and one in Bogor. The critical control points in the production line were identified. Milk samples were collected from the critical points and were analysed for the total number of microbes. Antibiotic residues were detected on raw milks. The study indicated that one unit in Bandung dan one unit in Jakarta produced pasteurized milk with lower number of microbes than the other units, due to better management and control applied along the chain of production. Penisilin residues was detected in raw milk used by unit in Bogor. Six critical points and the hazard might arise in those points were identified, as well as how to prevent the hazards. Quality assurance system such as HACCP would be able to produce high quality and safety of pasteurised milk, and should be implemented gradually.   Key words: Pasteurised milk, food safety, HACCP
Successful ICSI depends on DNA stability and disulfide status of sperm nuclei Said, Syahruddin; Niwa, Koji
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 9, No 3 (2004): SEPTEMBER 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (161.67 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i3.411

Abstract

Relation of successful ICSI (intracytoplasmic sperm injection) with DNA stability and thiol-disulfide status of rat spermatozoa nuclei was investigated. Testicular, caput and cauda epididymal spermatozoa have been used for this research. The nuclei of these spermatozoa were stained with aeridine orange for DNA stability test and labeled with mBBr for thiol-disulfide status before injesting into oocytes. Cauda epididymal spermatozoa were very stable and contained high disulfide than caput epididymal and testicular spermatozoa. Results from spermatozoa injection into oocytes show that they were capable to fertilize oocytes. However, testicular spermatozoa can not develop up to blastocyst stage. These results indicated that successful ICSI at least in the rat depends on DNA stability and disulfide status of sperm nuclei.   Key words: ICSI, DNA stability, disulfide status, acridine orange, mBBr
Effectivity of Aloe vera bioactives as feed additive for broilers reared on deep litter Sinurat, A.P; Purwadaria, T; Pasaribu, T; Rakhmani, W; Dharma, J; Rosida, J; Sitompul, S; ., Udjianto
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 9, No 3 (2004): SEPTEMBER 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (155.675 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i3.402

Abstract

There are plenty of Indonesian plants contain usefull bioactive components. One of them is Aloe vera. Previous experiment showed that Aloe vera bioactives reduced aerob bacteria in the intestinal and improved feed efficiency in broilers reared in cages. The results however, gave some variations, may be due to variation in rearing the chickens. Two experiments were carried out to study the effectivity of Aloe vera bioactives as feed additives for broilers reared on deep litter. In the first study, six experimental diets in mash form were formulated, i.e.: Control (K); K + antibiotic; K + 0.50 g/kg dry Aloe vera (LBK); K + 1.00 g/kg LBK; K + anthraquinone; K + Aloe vera in semi-liquid form. The amount of semi liquid Aloe vera and the anthraquinone were equally to 1.00 g LBK/kg. Results showed that antibiotic improved body weight gain 6.10% and feed efficiency 5.50% better than the control, although statistically not significant (P>0.05). Aloe vera bioactives in low doses (0.50 g/kg) also improved weight gain (6.30%) and feed efficiency (5.20%) similar to the antibiotic. However, Aloe vera in high doses and anthraquinone (equal to 1.00 g/kg diet) did not improve performance of broilers. There were no significant changes on carcass yield, abdominal fat levels, weight of liver, gizard and gastro intestinal tract due to any feed additives tested. The second experiment were carried out to study the effectivity of feed additives when included in crumble diets. Six experimental diets, i.e.: Control (K), K + antibiotic, K + Semi-liquid Aloe vera (equal to 1.00g dry Aloe vera/kg), K + 0.50 g dry Aloe vera/kg, K + 1.00 g dry Aloe vera/kg, K + 0.50 g dry Aloe vera + 0.50 g Curcuma xanthorrhiza meal/kg. All diets were fed in crumble form. Results showed that chickens fed with feed additives (antibiotic or Aloe vera bioactives) have a significantly (P<0.05) higher body weight gain and feed efficiency than those fed with control diet. The best weight gain was achieved by low dose dry Aloe vera (1342 g/bird) and the lowest was the control (1039 g/bird). The best feed conversion ratio was achieved by antibiotic treatment (1.756) followed by low dose dry Aloe vera + curcuma meal (1.758) and the worst was showed by the control (1.908). It is concluded that Aloe vera bioactives at low dose (0.50 g/kg diet) could improve body weight gain and feed efficiency of broilers reared on deep litter. The improvement achieved was similar as the antibiotic. The bioactive is more effective when fed in crumble diets.   Key words: Broilers, bioactives, Aloe vera
Seroepidemiology of Canine parvovirus infection in dogs Sendow, Indrawati; Syafriati, Tatty
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 9, No 3 (2004): SEPTEMBER 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (196.538 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i3.407

Abstract

Canine parvovirus is an acute and fatal viral disease in dogs. A total of 209 local, cross breed and breed dogs sera from Kodya Bogor, Kabupaten Bogor, Sukabumi, and Jakarta, had been tested using Haemagglutination Inhibition Test (HI) with pig red blood cells. A total of 64 breed and cross breed dogs from Sukabumi and Kodya Bogor, were used as a sentinel dogs to study the epidemiology of Canine parvovirus (CPV) infection and its immunological responses caused by vaccination. The results indicated that 78% (95) breed and cross bred dogs and 59% (51) local dogs had antibody to CPV. Sentinel dogs results indicated that dogs had been vaccinated showed antibody response with the varied titre dependant upon prevaccination titre. Low prevaccinated titre gave better response than protective level titre. From 19 puppies observed, Maternal antibodi were still detected until 5 weeks old puppies. First vaccination given at less than 3 months old, should be boosted after 3 months old puppied. Antibodi titre produced by natural infection will keep untill 2 years. These data concluded that the dog condition and time of vaccination will affect the optimum antibody response.   Key words: Canine parvovirus, haemagglutination inhibition, isolation
Rice bran inclusion in the fruit and vegetable waste-based diets for fryer rabbits Prawirodigdo, S; ., Muryanto; Yuwono, D.M
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 9, No 3 (2004): SEPTEMBER 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (141.618 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i3.403

Abstract

The aim of the study is to investigate the effect of rice bran inclusion in the fruit and vegetable waste (FVW)-based diets on the growth performance of fryer rabbits. Thirty-six growing rabbits (New Zealand x Flemish Giant) of about 1070.8 g initial body-weight were housed individually in the wire mesh cages and assigned to either one of a FVW-based diet containing 20% rice bran (RB 20%), 10% rice bran (RB 10%) or zero rice bran (RB 0%). Thus, each treatment consists of 12 replicates. Data were collected for 28 days. Results showed that inclusion of rice bran in the diet significantly decreased (P<0.05) dry matter intake (2888, 2830 and 3095 g, for Diets RB 20%, RB 10%, and RB 0%, respectively). Average daily weight gain of the rabbits consuming RB 20% (23 g), RB 10% (25 g) and RB 0% (33 g) was significantly different (P<0.05). Inclusion of rice bran in the FVW-based diet significantly (P<0.05) affected the feed conversion ratio of the diets (3.4 versus 4.4 and 4.1, for RB 0% versus RB 20% and RB 10%, respectively). Consistently, the average carcass weight of rabbits consuming RB 0% (1140g) was superior (P<0.05) to the carcass weight of rabbits fed RB 20% (1022 g) or RB 10% (1046 g). Overall, inclusion of rice bran in the FVW based diet is not necessary. Simultaneously, use of FVW for rabbit is promising to avoid the accumulated fermenting FVW problem and produce healthy meat instantly for food.   Key words: Fruit and vegetable waste, rice bran, fryer rabbit, growth rate, carcass
The effect of the liver fluke Fasciola gigantica infestation on the leucocyte eosinophil cell profile on sheep Widjajanti, S; Estuningsih, S.E; ., Subandriyo; Piedrafita, D; Raadsma, H.W
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 9, No 3 (2004): SEPTEMBER 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (206.528 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i3.408

Abstract

Eosinophil is one of the major leucocyte cell in the blood which specifically reacted on parasite infection, thus it is important to determine its profile against the F. gigantica infection. The aims of this study is to determine the differences of the eosinophil count profiles on the different breed of sheep infected with F. gigantica and its relation with the resistance of sheep bred against parasitic disease. Four groups of sheep consist of Indonesian Thin Tail (ITT) sheep, Merino sheep, backcross sheep (10 families) and F2 sheep were infected with 300 metacercariae of Fasciola gigantica. The total sheep used in this trial is 621. Those sheep were observed for 12 weeks and the blood samples were collected every 2 weeks after infection. The results showed that total eosinophil counts in all infected sheep increased after two weeks post infection and ITT sheep showed the highest counts. On the other hand, the mean fluke counts on ITT sheep is the lowest compared with the other groups of sheep. Merino and F2 sheep had the highest mean fluke counts. Three families of backcross sheep had the mean flukes count similar to ITT sheep and the other 7 families were similar to the Merino sheep. In conclusion, the highest total eosinophil count at the early stage of infection on ITT sheep might be related with the genetic resistance, which was showed by the lowest flukes count, and the resistance was inherited to some of the backcross sheep, which had similar flukes count with ITT sheep.   Key words: Fasciola gigantica, eosinophil, sheep
The effect of sugar cane waste product fermented by Pleurotus ostreatus on the ration to Priangan sheep performance Tarmidi, Ana Rochana
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 9, No 3 (2004): SEPTEMBER 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (170.009 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i3.404

Abstract

Bagasse from Saccharum officinarum has potency as roughage source for ruminants. The objective of this research was to evaluate the use of bagasse fermented by Pleurotus ostreatus (ATB) to feed consumption, daily gain and feed efficiency of Priangan sheep. The research was arranged into two stages, i.e: (i) bioconversion of bagasse by P. ostreatus, and (ii) biological test using ATB. Twenty five heads of male Priangan sheep with average body weight of 18.99 + 0.22 kg were fed with ATB for three months. A completely randomized design was carried out with five replications. The treatment were: R0= 70.0% King grass + 30.0% concentrate; R1= 59.50% King grass + 10.10% ATB + 30% concentrate; R2= 49.00% King grass + 21.10% ATB + 30% concentrate; R3= 38.50% King grass + 31.50% ATB + 30% concentrates, and R4= 28.00% King grass + 42% ATB + 30% concentrate. The results of the experiment showed that bagasse fermented by P. ostreatus (ATB) did not indicate negative effects on feed consumption, daily gain, and feed efficiency of Priangan sheep, and ATB can be used as ingredient of Priangan sheep ration up to 31.50% based on dry matter of the ration.   Key words: Bagasse, Pleurotus ostreatus, feed consumption, daily gain, feed efficiency

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