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Ahmadi Riyanto
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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 18 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 9, No 2 (2004)" : 18 Documents clear
Biological value (in vitro and in sacco) of chemically treated feather as rumen by pass protein source Puastuti, W; Yulistiani, D; Mathius, I-W
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 9, No 2 (2004)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i2.412

Abstract

A series of experiments has been conducted to study chemical processing method of feather meal using hydrocloric acid (HCl) and to evaluate the biological values by in vitro and is sacco methods of the hydrolitic feather meal (HBA). Feather meal was hydrolyzed using four levels of HCl concentration (i.e.0, 6, 12 and 24%) in three incubation times (i.e. 2, 4, and 6 days). The hydrolysis reaction was carried out in closed container in the ratio of feather meal and HCl of 2:1 (w/v). In vitro evaluation was conducted to measure dry matter (DM) and organic matter (OM) digestibility, DM solubility, ammonia (NH3) and volatile fatty acid (VFA) content. In sacco to observe the degradation of HBA crude protein. Results of in sacco evaluation in rumen showed that soluble and degraded crude proteins (CP) were significantly only affected by HCl concentration (P<0.01). The rate and the amount of degraded protein in 24 hours inclution in the rumen were affected by the HCl concentration and incubation time of hydrolysis. More amino acid degradation occurred on longer time showed that HCl had quadratic effect (P<0,01) on pH of HBA. However durations of hydrolysis did not significantly affect acidity (P>0.05). In vitro DM and OM digestibilities of HBA increased as the concentration of HCl was increased. The increase of DM digestibility followed the equation Y = -0.0231x3 + 0.7323x2 – 1.5716x + 12.383 (r = 0.994); and the OM digestibility followed the equation Y = -0.0229x3 + 0.7194x2 – 1.0606x + 15.951 (r = 0.993). Time of incubation, on the other hand, did not affect OM and DM digestibilities (P>0.05). DM solubility of HBA was significantly affected by HCl concentration and the length of incubation time (P<0.01). The increase of DM solubility was followed by the increase of NH3 content (P<0.01). The relation between DM solubility and NH3 content followed the equation Y = 0.4365x + 5.4047 (r = 0.966). The increase of DM solubility followed the equation Y = -0.027x3 + 0.9596x2 – 4.8142x + 5.3878 (r = 0.973) and the increase of NH3 content followed the equation Y = -0.0085x3 + 0.3175x2 – 1.4139x + 7.0889 (r = 0.992). Result of in sacco evaluation showed that fraction of crude protein (CP) disolved and fraction of CP degraded in rumen was significantly affected by HCl concentration (P<0.01), while the rate of CP degradation and the amount of fraction degraded during 24 hours in the rumen were affected by the HCl concentration and the durations of hydrolysis (P<0.01)  indicating that more feather meal protein was hydrolized by HCl, therefore weakened or cut the chain of amino acid in the feather protein. Treatment with 12% HCl for 4 days hydrolysis of feather meal resulted in CP fraction degradation during 24 hours incubation in the rumen of 53%, indicating that the potency of CP of HBA as rumen by pass protein was 47%.   Key words: Chicken feather, HCl hydrolysis, digestibility by pass protein
Genetic relationships of Kampung, Pelung, Sentul and Black Kedu Chicken using Microsatellite DNA Markers: I. Lingkage group of macro chromosome Sartika, Tike; Iskandar, S; Prasetyo, L.H; Takahashi, H; Mitsuru, M
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 9, No 2 (2004)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i2.413

Abstract

Genetic relationships of Kampung, Pelung, Sentul and Black Kedu chickens were studied on the basis of microsatellite DNA polymorphism. DNA samples were analyzed using nine microsatellite markers which chosen from linkage group of macrochromosome (chromosome 1-8) such as, locus ABR 258, ABR359, ABR 297, ABR 339, ABR 75, ABR 209, ABR 28, ABR 419 and ABR 604. Analyses of amplified DNA fragments were performed using Gene Mapper 2.0 software (PE, Applied Biosystems). The allele frequencies in each breed estimated by direct counting. Since all nine microsatellite markers were polymorphic, genetic distance between the breeds could be calculated based on the frequencies of alleles of the microsatellite. Genetic relationships between the breeds could be constructed. The results indicated that a total of 73 allele were detected while typing all the four breeds of local chicken and one breed of White Leghorn as outgroup breed acrossed nine loci. The number of alleles was observed in all of the breed ranged 3-17 alleles according to the microsatellite under scrutiny. Highest observed number of alleles was found in Kampung Chicken 60 alleles (82.2%). The UPGMA method for dendogram based on Nei genetic distances indicated that the local chickens have the same of ancestor, while Kampung and Sentul chicken have the same cluster followed by Black Kedu and Pelung Chicken.   Key words: Local chicken, microsatellite, macrochromosome, genetic distance
Morphology growth curve of female cross breed duck between Pekin and White Mojosari Suparyanto, A; Martojo, H; Hardjosworo, P.S; Prasetyo, L.H
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 9, No 2 (2004)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i2.414

Abstract

Morphological growth is a very dynamic process. It is reflected the changes of body structure affected by genetic and environmental responses. Each parameter had different growth curve sigmoid pattern those expressed different characteristics. Phenotypic growth data were collected from female ducks resulted from crossbreed between Pekin male and White Mojosari. The hatchers were twicely collected, the first collection was 69 heads and then they were 89 heads. Equation of non-linier regression is determined by Gompertz model using the Marquardt method. Result showed that fast growth happened from the start to 30 days old. Estimation values of circumstance and depth brest length variables were 30 and 83 mm respectively. In the first derivation, the maximum size of back and brest were observed on 16 weeks old. In the second derivation the maximum sizes of wide hip, wide and depth brestes were reached for longer time, those were 22 to 25 weeks. Meanwhile, the correlation between parameter A (body mature) and k (rate of mature) was negative. Every variable had different oscillation slopes, the slope of two infexion points of the original curve or they were variative.     Key words: Duck, growth curve, morphology, crossbreed
The effect of freezing rate temperatures and kind of extenders on the quality of frozen sperm of Priangan Goat Herdiawan, I
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 9, No 2 (2004)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i2.415

Abstract

The study has been conducted on Animal Reproduction Laboratory of Animal Husbandry Faculty, Padjadjaran University, in Jatinangor, Sumedang, West Java to find out the interaction of freezing rate temperatures and kind of extenders on frozen semen quality after thawing. Factorial completely randomized design was used in the experimant with first factor was freezing rate temperatures (7, 13, and 200C/mins), and second factor was semen extenders (egg yolk-citrate and egg yolk tris-base). Each treatment had four replication. Variables observed were sperm mobility and abnormality, aerosome and membrane sperm cell integrities, sperm viability incubated in water for four to seven hours, and sperm recovery after thawing. Results of statistical analysis show that there was interaction between freezing rate of 13°C/mins and egg yolk tris-base on sperm motility. However, other variables did not indicated interactions. The best sperm motility was observed from the freezing rate 13°C/mins on egg yolk tris-base, it had recovery value of 52.53%. Main effect analysis show that freezing rate 13°C/mins had highly significantly results than others treatment (P<0.01) on lowest abnormality, best integraty of acrosome and membrane cell, viability in water incubation for four and seven hours and recovery value after thawing, subsequently they were 16.04, 42.88, 37.90, 35.54, 23.51 and 50.92%. Main effect on extender showed that egg yolk tris-base significantly (P<0.05) 7 best for lowest abnormality west for integrity of acrosome and membrane cell, viability in water incubation for four and seven hour, sperm recovery value after thawing subsequently they were 19.05, 39.17, 35.86, 32.30, 21.12 and 50.00%.  Key words: Freezing rates, extender, quality of frozen semen, Priangan goat
diversity of myiasis fly, Chrysomya bezziana population in Indonesia based on mitochondrial DNA Wardhana, April H; Muharsini, S; Asmara, Widya
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 9, No 2 (2004)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i2.416

Abstract

Chrysomya bezziana is a fly causing myiasis in most livestock in Indonesia. To date, the genetic diversity of C. bezziana has been argued among researchers. The aim of this study was to analyse genetic diversity of C. bezziana population in Indonesia using mitochondrial cytochrome b gene (cyt b) as a marker. The preliminary study showed that the larvae instar III stadium (L3) was the most appropriate sample for molecular analysis and identification. Twenty-four L3 were collected from cattles, buffalos and horses in Bogor, Makassar and East Sumba. DNA samples were isolated from muscle tissue of the larvae. The fragment of cyt b gene (279 bp) was amplified using primer CB3FC-NINFA. The PCR product was subsequently purified, sequenced and analysed using PAUP version 4. The results showed that C. bezziana from Indonesia was different with those from Asia, basicaly for DNA sequences, however it had similar to those from Papua New Guinea. Two haplotypes were identified i.e. haplotype 6 (Makassar haplotype that similar to those from Papua New Guinea) and haplotype 7 (Bogor haplotype that similar to those from Makassar and East Sumba). Key words: Chrysomya bezziana, genetic diversity, mitochondrial DNA
Gambaran seroepidemiologi dan histopatologi infeksi virus parainfluenza tipe 3 pada sapi Sendow, Indrawati; Syafriati, Tatty; Damayanti, Rini
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 9, No 2 (2004)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i2.417

Abstract

A study to gain seroepidemiological feature and histopathological changes in order to obtain a viral causative agent had been conducted against parainfluenza virus type 3 (PI-3) in infection cattle in Indonesia. Serological survey was conducted in different areas in Indonesia and from serum Bank to gain the information on the distribution of parainfluenza type 3 (PI-3) in large ruminants. A total of 1334 sera had been tested using serum neutralization test, and the result indicated that prevalence of reactors was varied from 0 to 60 %. The highest prevalence was 60% in sera detected from Bogor abbatoir. Reactors were also found in other areas such as West Java, Central Java, East Java, NTT and Papua. Titration results indicated that the distribution of titre was varied from 4 to 256, and titre of 8 to 32 was the most common. Titre of 128 and 256 was only found in each of 1 sera only. Isolation results indicated that no isolate was obtained from 237 samples processed. Histological examination showed that more than 60% had interstitial pneumonia, which indicated vairal infection had been occurred. This serological result indicated that PI-3 infection was detected in Indonesian large ruminants.   Key words: Parainfluenza type 3 virus, serology, histopathology
Pathogenicity and immunogenicity local isolat infectious laryngo tracheitis virus Indriani, Risa; Hamid, Helmy; Adjid, R.M Abdul; Saepulloh, Muharam
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 9, No 2 (2004)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i2.418

Abstract

Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is an acute and contagious respiratory diseases of chicken. The virus is Gallid herpes and belong to family herpesviridae. Two local strains of ILT virus those were BGR-6 and BKS-3 were isolated and their pathogenicity and immunogenicity were further observed after five time pareses on coris allantoic of specific pathogenic free embryonated eggs. The pathogenicity of both isolates to be possible for use as seed vaccine were detected based on pathogenicity indices and antibody response. Experimental specific pathogenic free chicken in isolator cages were infected by the isolates using103EID50. ILT virus per dose. Clinical syndromes, pathological anatomic lesions, and immunological response were observed in the infected chickens and another group at uninfected chickens as a control. Results showed that either BGR-6 or BKS-3 caused clinical signs with ITPI scores of 0,05 and 0,03 respectively and there were no mortality of infected chickens. The top antibody responces of BGR-6 and BKS-3 were observed at OD 0.90 and 0.44 respectively. It can be concluded that BGR-6 and BBS-3 had low ITPI scores, but BGR-6 gave higher antibody response and can be used as a candidate for seed vaccine.   Key words: Infectious laryngotracheitis, ILT, BGR-6, BKS-3, pathogenicity, immunogenicity
The clinico-pathological effects of chicken infected with highly pathogenic avian influenza in some farms located in East Java and West Java Damayanti, R; Dharmayanti, NLP.I; Indriani, R; Wiyono, Achmad Selamet; ., Darminto
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 9, No 2 (2004)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i2.419

Abstract

The study was conducted to investigate the clinico-pathological features of highly contagious disease occurred in chicken located in East and West Java during the outbreak in September-October 2003. Six farms located in Districts of Surabaya, Malang and Blitar of East Java had been visited. They were mainly commercial layer, breeder layer and breeder broiler, which the population was between 14.000, 80.000, and aged 17-70 weeks. Where as five farms in West Java (Districts of Bogor, Bekasi and their surrounding areas) were visited and consisted of commercial layer and breeder broiler, having population of 3000-16.000 and aged 11-53 weeks. Observation was made according to clinical, gross pathological and histopathological changes. Clinically, most of them had cyanotic wattle and comb and subcutaneous petechiation of non-feathered part of the legs. These were also seen in necropsy, accompanied by general circulatory disturbances in most organs: namely pectoral and thigh muscle, trachea, lungs, epicard, myocard, proventriculus, liver, kidney and ovary. In addition, the liver was congested, friable and necrotic in some parts. Histologically, hemorrhage and non suppurative inflammatory reaction were observed in the brain, skin (comb, wattle and non feathered leg), skeletal muscle, trachea, lung, heart, proventriculus, liver, kidney and ovary whereas vasculitis was found especially in the skin of the wattle and comb, brain and kidney. It is concluded that based on the clinicopathological findings the outbreak of poultry disease in East and West Java were attributed to highly pathogenic avian influenza.   Key words: Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI), chicken, clinico-pathology, outbreak, East Java, West Java
Identification of avian influenza virus of Indonesian isolates by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method Dharmayanti, N.L.P.I.; Damayanti, R; Wiyono, A; Indriani, R; ., Darminto
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 9, No 2 (2004)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i2.420

Abstract

An outbreak of avian influenza in Indonesia was reported at the first time at the beginning of September 2003 causing high mortality among poultry population especially commercial layer chicken farms in Java, Sumatra and Bali islands. From the outbreaks highly pathogenic avian infuenza viruses have been isolated and characterized by rapid, HA, HI and AGP tests. However, these isolates are still needed to be further molecularly characterized. The aim of this study is to identify by further subtyping the avian viruses by means of RT-PCR using Matrix, H7 and H5 primers. The study reveals that the RT-PCR using Matrix primer amplified a 200-300 basepairs (bp) Jawa Timur isolates were collected from East Java, while Jawa Barat isolates were from West Java. The RT-PCR using H7 primers did not amplify any product, while H5 primer amplified a 500-600 bp product from the isolates. It is concluded that the outbreak of poultry disease in East and West Java was caused by an avian influenza H5 subtype.   Key words: Identification, avian influenza virus, RT-PCR, H5 subtype
The clinico-pathological effects of chicken infected with highly pathogenic avian influenza in some farms located in East Java and West Java Damayanti, R; Dharmayanti, NLP.I; Indriani, R; Wiyono, Achmad Selamet; ., Darminto
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 9, No 2 (2004): JUNE 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (448.741 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i2.419

Abstract

The study was conducted to investigate the clinico-pathological features of highly contagious disease occurred in chicken located in East and West Java during the outbreak in September-October 2003. Six farms located in Districts of Surabaya, Malang and Blitar of East Java had been visited. They were mainly commercial layer, breeder layer and breeder broiler, which the population was between 14.000, 80.000, and aged 17-70 weeks. Where as five farms in West Java (Districts of Bogor, Bekasi and their surrounding areas) were visited and consisted of commercial layer and breeder broiler, having population of 3000-16.000 and aged 11-53 weeks. Observation was made according to clinical, gross pathological and histopathological changes. Clinically, most of them had cyanotic wattle and comb and subcutaneous petechiation of non-feathered part of the legs. These were also seen in necropsy, accompanied by general circulatory disturbances in most organs: namely pectoral and thigh muscle, trachea, lungs, epicard, myocard, proventriculus, liver, kidney and ovary. In addition, the liver was congested, friable and necrotic in some parts. Histologically, hemorrhage and non suppurative inflammatory reaction were observed in the brain, skin (comb, wattle and non feathered leg), skeletal muscle, trachea, lung, heart, proventriculus, liver, kidney and ovary whereas vasculitis was found especially in the skin of the wattle and comb, brain and kidney. It is concluded that based on the clinicopathological findings the outbreak of poultry disease in East and West Java were attributed to highly pathogenic avian influenza.   Key words: Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI), chicken, clinico-pathology, outbreak, East Java, West Java

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