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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 18 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 9, No 1 (2004)" : 18 Documents clear
Influence of Bacillus apiarius supplementation on the performance of layer chicken Kompiang, Putu; ., Supriyati; Sjofjan, O
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 9, No 1 (2004)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i1.421

Abstract

An experiment has been conducted to study the effect of replacing feed additive zinc-bacitracine with probiotic Bacillus apiarius on layer performance. One thousand two hundreds 22-weeks old layers used in this experiment, were divided into three group-treatments and it further divided into 4 subgroups (100 birds/subgroup) as treatment replicates and distributed randomly. Layer in group I were fed basal diet + Growth promotant antibiotic (GPA)-zinc bacitracin, group II were fed basal diet + B. apiarius culture and group III were fed basal diet + commercial probiotic. Feed and water were given ad libitum during the 16 weeks trial. The treatments had no effect (P>0.05) on feed intake. Percentage of hen-day production of group II (88.75 ± 0.88%) was similar to group III (89.58 ± 1.14%), and both were very significantly (P<0.01) higher than group I (77.83 ± 6.21%). Total egg mass production of group II (5.82 ± 0.30 kg/head/16 weeks), was similar to group III (5.64 ± 0.51 kg/head/16 weeks) and both were significantly (P<0.01) higher than group I (4.85 ± 0.45 kg/head/16 weeks). The FCR value of group II (2.48 ± 0.10) was similar to group III (2.43 ± 0.14) and both were very significantly (P<0.01) better than group I (2.86 ± 0.26). The treatments had no effect on egg weight and egg shell thickness. Yolk’s cholesterol content of the group I (4.58 ± 0,56 mg/100 g) was significantly higher than group II (3.72 ± 0.34 mg/100 g) or group III (3.41 ± 0.43 mg/ 100 g). From the present trial it could be concluded that B. apiarius has a potential as probiotic for layer, it even gave better performance and lower cholesterol content of the yolk.   Key words: Layer chickens, probiotic, cholesterol
Supplementation of corn-soybean based layer diets with different levels of acid protease Purbojo, Satrijo Widi; Luis, Edwin S; Tambunan, Reny Debora; Pamungkas, Dicky
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 9, No 1 (2004)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i1.422

Abstract

The aim of this research was held in Institute of Animal Science farm, University of the Philippines Los Banos, was to know the effects of acid protease supplementation in layer diets. Ninety-four-week old pullets were caged individually. Five treatments were randomly arranged to 95 pullets following a completely randomized design. Each treatment was replicated 19 times. The feeding trial lasted for 16 weeks. The same management practices were provided to all treatments throughout the feeding period. Pullets were fed once a day in the morning and clean drinking water was available to the pullets at all times. A basal layer diet that contained 18% crude protein (CP) and 2800 Kcal ME/kg supplemented with required vitamins, minerals and amino acids were formulated. The diets with reduced protein of 17% and 2800 kcal ME/kg was also formulated. The diet with the reduced crude protein was supplemented with different levels of protease (0.05, 0.075 and 0.1%). Six birds from each treatment were randomly selected and placed in individual digestion cages. They were fed with their respective diets with chromic oxide as indicator for 7 days. Chromic oxide was added to the different diets at 0.2%. On the 3rd to 6th day of feeding, feces were collected using stainless fecal trays installed under each cage. At the end of the collection period, fecal samples collected from each replicate of treatment were dried then subjected to proximate analysis and chromic oxide determination. Result showed that no significant difference on biweekly feed consumption and overall observations. Reduced CP + 0.1% protease was the highest on the hen day production (93.75%) and the lowest of feed conversion (1.85) while reduced CP + 0.075% protease was the highest of egg weight (58.82 g) and eggshell thickness (0.392 mm). There was no significant difference on digestibility coefficient.   Key words: Acid protease, layer diets, supplementation
The effect of physic conditions of Caliandra calothyrsus and its mixing with fresh Gliricidia sepium toward the consumption and nutrient digestibility of sheep ., Firdus; Astuti, Dewi Apri; Wina, Elizabeth
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 9, No 1 (2004)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i1.423

Abstract

It is reported that feedstuff preparation affects intake and digestibility of the ration. The objective of this experiment was to know the effect of physic conditions of Caliandra calothyrsus and its mixing with fresh Gliricidia sepium toward the digestibility and nutrient consumption of sheep. Fourty nine (49) thin tail sheep with the average body weight of 15.42 kg (SD 2.68) was randomly assigned into one out of five treatment groups of greenery feed which composed of different fresh Penisetum sp. (FP), fresh Caliandra calothyrsus (FC), fresh Gliricidia sepium (FG), dried C. calothyrsus (DC) and steamed C calothyrsus (SC). Treatment A (70% FP + 30% FC), B (70% FP + 30% FG), C (70% FP + 15% SC + 15% FG), D (70% FP + 15% DC +15% FG) and E (70% FP + 15% DC + 15% FG). The treatments had been carried out for 90 days. Water was given ad libitum. Parameters recorded in this experiment were nutrient consumption (dry matter/BK, crude protein, energy) and nutrient digestibility (BK, crude protein, energy). Data recorded were processed by covariant analysis with body weight of sheep at the early experiment treatment as a covariant. Results of the experiment showed that there were significant difference (P<0.05) between fresh, dried, and steamed C. calothyrsus and its mixing with fresh G. sepium toward the consumption and nutrient digestibility. The average of consumption and nutrient digestibility value were high in mixing treatment of 15% fresh C. calothyrsus with 15% fresh G. sepium.   Key words: Sheep, Caliandra calothyrsus, Gliricidia sepium, consumption, digestibility
Predicted of production curve and persistensy by wood non-linier model on white Mojosari duck Suparyanto, Agus; Prasetyo, L.H
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 9, No 1 (2004)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i1.424

Abstract

Until recent, the biology data from white Mojosari duck have been never reported. Different from their sister, the brown Mojosari duck was establish for laying duck. Equation model of non-linier Wood was commonly used to predict the milk production curve. This method is possible for egg production of laying duck. The purpose of the research is understanding of production curve fitted and persistency. The data were collected from 39 birds of White Mojosari duck in Balitnak Ciawi. Four types of analysis data set, those are partial data (16 weeks), full data (52 week), collective and individual data of egg production. The equation of mathematic non-linier Wood is Y=AtBexp-kt by DUD method. The result show that egg production was 236 for 52 weeks record and twenty five percent were reached up than 290 eggs. Production trait will decrease on 4-5th month and after that slow up for increasing, but never came as high as the first and second month production. Estimation of A parameter is 5.5- 6.9 eggs per week, meanwhile the constantan of B is 1.0-1.1 and k is 0.007-0.02 respectively for production data. By percent, showed that A (83-84%), B (0.02-0.06) and k (0.006-001), that all for partial and full data. Genetic correlation between parameter A and B is negative, which is 0.94–0.098 (production data) and 0.24-0.76 respectively. Positive correlation was resulted between B and k parameters. But for A and k parameters were both are positive and negative result. Estimation of persistency was 3.8 weeks for individual data and 3.7 weeks for collective data by partial (16 weeks) data set. And than the fulldata (52 weeks) are 4.0 and 4.1 respectively for collective and individual data set.   Key words: White Mojosari duck, non-linear, production curve
Molecular characterization of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) isolates from outbreak cases at Lipa City, Batangas Province, The Philippines Saepulloh, Muharam
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 9, No 1 (2004)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i1.425

Abstract

Investigations were carried out to identify molecular character of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) isolates from commercial layer chicken farm located at Lipa City, Batangas Province, the Philippines using western blotting. The virus was first isolated in chorio allantoic membrane (CAM). A-total of five isolates (#IV, #VI-C28, #VI-C29, #VI-C30, and #VII) produced typical plaque lesions in CAM at second passages such as yellowish plaques with opaque edges. Furthermore, five isolates were then characterized by western blotting on 7.5% of acrylamide. These results showed that Chicken antisera to the ILTV strain NS-175 (as standard sera), and rabbit antisera to vaccine strain (BAL-ILT) recognized four major viral protein with molecular weight of 205, 160, 85 and 60 kDa of isolates #VI-C28, #VI-C29, #VI-30 and #VII. While the isolate # IV produced viral protein of 205 and 85 kDa. The same four viral proteins were recognized by both ILTV antisera, indicating that the viral proteins of the vaccine strain and ILTV local isolates from Lipa City, Batangas Province, the Philippine had cross-reactivity. Thus, this cross reactivity may cause the effective protection afforded by the vaccine strain in the field.   Key words: Infectious laryngotracheitis virus, CAM, western blotting, chicken
Technique development of attractant test for Chrysomya bezziana in laboratory and semi-field conditions Wardhana, April H; ., Sukarsih
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 9, No 1 (2004)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i1.426

Abstract

Swormlure (SL-2), synthetic attractant for the New World Screwworm Fly (NWSF), Cochliomya hominivorax, have been developed and used in the America. The effectiveness of swormlure in attracting the Old World Screwworm Fly (OWSF), Chrysomya bezziana is not well defined. The aim of the study was to provide suitable condition of the attractant in trapping the higher number at the OWSF in laboratory (cage assay) and semi-field (room assay) conditions. The cage assay to screen responses olfactory stimuli of OWSF was developed to asses the fly responses to lights, exhaust fan (on or off), the flies’ physiological status and whether there was any bias between cages or trap positions. Modifications were made to provide suitable physical and environmental conditions for candidate attractant. These included darkening all windows with paper, the construction of support for the fly cages and installation of additional lights centred above the fly cages. The room assay was used as an intermediate step between the cage assay and the field experiment. The number of entered flies into the trap indicated flies respond to SL-2. The data of cage assay was analysed by ANOVA and data of room assay was analysed by T test (5%). The results showed that standard experimental conditions for the cage assay: two lights above the cages on and the central lights off, covering fluorescent lights with oil paper, the jar trap positions on the centre line parallel to the lights and exhaust fan was turned off (no air flow) during the session but was turned on in between sessions to reduce the odour from SL-2 in laboratory (p>0.05). The standard experimental conditions for the room assay used four fluorescents tubes, exhaust fan turned off during the replicates but turned on after replicated 3 and 6 for 15 minutes. Yellow half-size sticky was used as standard target (p>0.05).   Key words: Swormlure, SL-2, attractant, Chrysomya bezziana
The isolation of canine parvovirus and pathological changes of infected dogs Sendow, Indrawati; Hamid, Helmy
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 9, No 1 (2004)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i1.427

Abstract

The aims of this study are to isolate canine parvovirus (CPV) from the field case and to evaluate its histological aspects in CPV infected dogs. Samples were collected from intestine, intestine contained and mucose, as well as dogs feses from diarrhoea and blood diarrhoea. The suspension of those specimen was inoculated into Feline Kidney cells and observed for cythopathic effect (CPE). The presence of CPE indicated that there was viral isolate and continued to further identification using Haemaglutination (HA) test with pig red blood cells. Samples with positif in HA test were further identification using Haemaglutination Inhibition (HI) test against reference CPV antisera. Isolation result showed that from 81 samples processed, 10 samples indicated CPE in cell cultures, and had agglutinated in pig red blood cells and neutralised reference CPV antisera as the same titer of reference CPV antisera. Nine isolates were obtained from feces and 1 isolate was obtained from Mucose intestine from bloody diarrhoea dogs. Those isolates were also obtained from 1 to 2 days post blood diarrhea clinical signs. Two from 10 cadavers examined showed histological changes to CPV infection. Isolate of CPV, originally from feces, was also obtained from one of the two cadavers. Based on the results it was concluded that more CPV viral isolates can be obtained from bloody diarrhea feces.   Key words: Canine parvovirus, inhibition, isolation, pathology, identification
Comparison between antibody-elisa test and fecal egg count for detecting Fasciola gigantica infection in cattle Estuningsih, S Endah; Widjajanti, S; Adiwinata, Gatot
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 9, No 1 (2004)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i1.428

Abstract

The comparison between antibody-ELISA test and fecal egg count for detection of natural infection of Fasciola gigantica in cattle was observed. One hundred and fifty samples of blood, feces and livers were collected from cattle slaughtered in the abattoir in Jakarta. Serum was collected from the blood samples and the level of antibody was determined by using antibody- ELISA test. The fecal samples were processed by using sedimentation technique in order to detect the present of F. Gigantica eggs. The livers were processed for liver flukes count. The result showed that from the liver examination, 38.7% cattle were negative flukes, 16% had 1-10 flukes, 34% cattle had 11-100 flukes and 11.3% cattle had more than 100 flukes. About 44.7% infected cattle had less than 100 eggs of F. gigantica per gram feces, however no eggs of F. gigantica were found in 13% infected cattle. The result of antibody-ELISA test showed that from 92 cattle infected with F. gigantica, 84 cattle had OD > 0.38 (range from 0.38-1.77) and 8 cattle had OD < 0.38 (range from 0.18-0.37). In contrast, from 58 cattle without flukes, 7 cattle had OD > 0.38 (range from 0.38-1.95) and 51 cattle with the OD < 0.38 (range from 0.1-0.33). The sensitivity of the fecal examination technique was 87% and the specificity was 100%. The sensitivity and specificity for antibody-ELISA test were 91 and 88% respectively.   Key words: Antibody-ELISA, Fasciola gigantica, feces, liver
Isolation and characterization of virus of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5 subtype of chicken from outbreaks in Indonesia Wiyono, Agus; Indriani, R; Dhamaryanti, N.L.P.I; Damayanti, R; Parede, L; Syafriati, T; ., Darminto
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 9, No 1 (2004)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i1.429

Abstract

A study on the isolation and characterization of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza of chicken from outbreaks in Indonesia was conducted at Indonesian Research Institute for Veterinary Science. Outbreaks of avian disease had been reported in Indonesia since August 2003 affecting commercial layer, broiler, quail, and ostrich and also native chicken with showing clinical signs such as cyanosis of wattle and comb, nasal discharges and hypersalivation, subcutaneous ptechiae on foot and leg, diarre and sudden high mortality. The aim of this study is to isolate and characterize the causal agent of the disease. Samples of serum, feather follicle, tracheal swab, as well as organs of proventriculus, intestine, caecal tonsil, trachea and lungs were collected from infected animals. Serum samples were tested haemaglutination/haemaglutination inhibition to Newcastle Disease and Egg Drop Syndrome viruses. Isolation of virus of the causal agent of the outbreak was conducted from samples of feather follicle, tracheal swab, and organs using 11 days old specific pathogen free (SPF) embryonated eggs. The isolated viruses were then characterised by agar gel precipitation test using swine influenza reference antisera, by haemaglutination inhibition using H1 to H15 reference antisera, and by electron microscope examination. The pathogenicity of the viruses was confirmed by intravenous pathogenicity index test and its culture in Chicken Embryo Fibroblast primary cell culture without addition of trypsin. The study revealed that the causative agent of the outbreaks of avian disease in Indonesia was avian influenza H5 subtype virus based upon serological tests, virus isolation and characterization using swine influenza reference antisera, and electron microscope examination. While subtyping of the viruses using H1 to H15 reference antisera suggested that the virus is very likely to be an avian influenza H5N1 subtype virus. The pathogenicity test confirmed that the viruses are highly pathogenic to experimental animals. It is concluded that the causative agent of the outbreaks of avian disease in Indonesia was avian influenza H5 subtype virus. The result has been the basis of further study such as development serological tests and vaccine production. The decission of Indonesian Government to conduct vaccination program using homolog vaccine in order to control the disease is regarded as the correct choice. However, it should be accompanied by conducting surveillance and monitoring of the disease as well as the possibility of mutation of virus. The program should be coordinated nationally.   Key words: Virus isolation, characterization, chicken, outbreak, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI), H5 subtype, Indonesia
The isolation of canine parvovirus and pathological changes of infected dogs Sendow, Indrawati; Hamid, Helmy
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 9, No 1 (2004): MARCH 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (280.024 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v9i1.427

Abstract

The aims of this study are to isolate canine parvovirus (CPV) from the field case and to evaluate its histological aspects in CPV infected dogs. Samples were collected from intestine, intestine contained and mucose, as well as dogs feses from diarrhoea and blood diarrhoea. The suspension of those specimen was inoculated into Feline Kidney cells and observed for cythopathic effect (CPE). The presence of CPE indicated that there was viral isolate and continued to further identification using Haemaglutination (HA) test with pig red blood cells. Samples with positif in HA test were further identification using Haemaglutination Inhibition (HI) test against reference CPV antisera. Isolation result showed that from 81 samples processed, 10 samples indicated CPE in cell cultures, and had agglutinated in pig red blood cells and neutralised reference CPV antisera as the same titer of reference CPV antisera. Nine isolates were obtained from feces and 1 isolate was obtained from Mucose intestine from bloody diarrhoea dogs. Those isolates were also obtained from 1 to 2 days post blood diarrhea clinical signs. Two from 10 cadavers examined showed histological changes to CPV infection. Isolate of CPV, originally from feces, was also obtained from one of the two cadavers. Based on the results it was concluded that more CPV viral isolates can be obtained from bloody diarrhea feces.   Key words: Canine parvovirus, inhibition, isolation, pathology, identification

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