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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 18 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 8, No 4 (2003)" : 18 Documents clear
The comparison of cellulase activities from bacteria and molds isolated from termites Purwadaria, Tresnawati; Marbun, Pesta A; Sinurat, Arnold P; Ketaren, Pius P
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 8, No 4 (2003)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (149.599 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v8i4.393

Abstract

Screening for choosing the best bacterium and mold producing cellulase was carried out from eight xylanolytic bacteria and three cellulolytic molds isolated from termites. Each bacterium and mold was inoculated on the agar medium containing minerals and carboxymethylcellulose. The diameters of colony and clearing zones were measured after stained with Congo red. Four bacteria: Bacillus larvae XB 1-1, B. larvae XU 2-2, Bacillus PU 2-2, and B. pumilus PU 4-2 showing higher clearing zone ratio were further submerged cultured in PM medium containing 2% wheat pollard in the shaker incubator at room temperature, 150 rpm for 36 and 48 hours. The three molds: Aspergillus flavus S 13, MS 21, and Penicillium nalgiovense S 11 were also cultured in the same way as bacteria, but in Mandels medium containing 2% wheat pollard for three and five days incubation time. B. pumilus PU 4-2 and A. flavus S 13 produced the highest CMCase in each group respectively. All enzyme assays of A. flavus S 13 had higher activities than that of B. pumilus PU 4-2. The specific activity of CMCase, avicelase, FPase, and cellobiohidrolase were the highest on the enzyme of A. flavus S 13 produced from 3 days incubation time, while its β- glucosidase was the best for five days incubation. In term of activities, A. flavus S 13 had the highest ability to produce cellulase. The ability of B. pumilus PU 4-2 to produce cellulase and xylanase at the same time was an additional value.   Key words: Bacillus pumilus, Aspergillus flavus, cellulases
Reproductive phenotype of two lines of Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) under two different room temperatures Nataamijaya, A.G
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 8, No 4 (2003)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (159.171 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v8i4.394

Abstract

Line as well as ambient temperature, substantially affected the reproductive performance of birds, hence in this study lines C (control) and P (meat type) were assigned into two room temperatures i.e. 18 and 35°C, represented higher and lower land areas of Indonesian archipelago. This study was conducted to find out the effect of line, ambient temperature and it’s interaction on the reproductive phenotype of Japanese quail. A Completely Randomed Design with 23 factorial arrangement was applied using 8 males and 24 females of each room temperature, every bird was kept in individual cage. Each male was mated to one female for 5 minutes per day for 3 consecutive days, 15 days later the same male was mated to the second female using the same manner. The third female was mated to this male using the same previous way. Parameters measured were copulation number, egg mass, testes weight, fertility and duration of fertility. Results showed that copulation number of line P (1.10 ± 0.29) were lower than (P<0.05) that of line C (1,84 ± 0,33). Within 14 day period line P produced higher egg mass compared with line C (66.91 g vs 55.88 g). Line P testis weight (6.82 ± 0.36 g) were significantly (P<0.01) higher than that of line C (3.18 ± 0.34 g), while room temperature slightly affected the testis weight. Fertility rate of line P (29.07 ± 14.12%) was much lower (P<0.01) than that of line C (46.90 ± 15.44 %). Duration of fertility of line P (1.10 ± 0.35 days) was also lower (P<0.01) than that of line C (3.48 ± 1.28 days). Copulation number and egg mass were not influenced by high room temperature while rate and duration of fertility were substansially affected. It was concluded that some reproductive parameters of male and female of Japanese quail were affected by body weight and room temperature in different way.   Key words: Line, quail, room temperature, reproductive
The growth allometrically Mandalung and histological muscle fiber leg Sari, Meisji Liana
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 8, No 4 (2003)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (129.038 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v8i4.395

Abstract

This study was conducted to compare the growth alometrically performance especially rate of muscle growth microscopically of Mandalung offspring of Muscovy x Duck (MD) and Duck x Muscovy (DM). Fifty-one Mandalung duck of IE and EI were used. They were fed with 2-type broiler commercial feed, which were starter type (day 1 – week 4) and finisher type (week 4 – week 12). Starter feed contained of 20% protein and 2800 kcal/kg energy while finisher feed contained of 18% protein and 3000 kcal/kg energy. Data on weights of slaughtered body and body parts (head, neck, fore back, rear back, breast, upper leg, lower leg, foot and its membrane) were measured at week 1, 4, 8 and 12. Diameter of muscle fiber was measured at age 8, 10 and 12 weeks, and each slaughter was represented by 1, 2 and 3 ducks. The results showed The growth direction was similar in IE and EI, initiated from head, to the neck, fore back and rear back, and from foot, to the thigh, breast and wings. Diameter of muscle fibers of Mandalung duck offspring of EI were larger (14,49 vs 13,37; 20,02 vs. 15, 24 μm; 23,68 vs. 18, 08 μm) than the IE.  Key words: Allometry, histological, muscle fiber
The dry matter digestibility characteristics of tropical tree legumes using menke in vitro gas production technique Pamungkas, Dicky; Sevilla, Cesar C
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 8, No 4 (2003)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (154.496 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v8i4.396

Abstract

The amount of gas released when a feed was incubated in vitro with rumen fluid, was closely related to the digestibility of the feed. The experiment using Menke in vitro gas production was conducted to determine the dry matter digestibility of tropical tree legumes; Leucaena leucocephala, Flemingia macrophyla, and Gliricida sepium. The samples were collected from Institute of Animal Science farms of the University of the Philippines at Los Banos. The amount of gas produced were recorded at 3, 6, 12, 48 and 72 hours of incubation. To estimate the volume of gas, the equation of Tuah was adopted; while to describe the course of gas production, the equation of MCDONALD was used. The washing loss was not measured and assumed to be zero. Results showed that leucaena at 12 hours was the highest in the volume of gas produced (1.217 ml/g DM). There was a similarity of highly increase of the gas produced between gliricidia and flemingia at 24 hours of incubation i.e 1.60 ml/g DM and 1.60ml/g DM. The potential extent gas production at 72 hours (b value) and the gas production rate (c value) of three legumes were no significantly different. According to the logarithmic-curve of gas volume produced, leucaena tended to be the highest of increase in potential extent and the gas production rate. The different rate of gas production in related to incubation reflected the dry matter digestibility of the three legumes in the rumen.   Key words: In vitro gas production, dry matter digestibility
The effectiveness of garlic extract (Allium sativum linn) in controlling aflatoxicosis in laying hens Maryam, Romsyah; Sani, Yulvian; Juariah, Siti; Firmansyah, Rachmat; ., Miharja
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 8, No 4 (2003)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (154.496 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v8i4.397

Abstract

Aflatoxicosis is a disease generated as the consequence of aflatoxin contamination in foods and feeds. Garlic (Allium sativum Linn.), a natural spice known to reduce the toxicity of aflatoxins in poultry. Twenty five laying hens were used to study the effectiveness of garlic extract in reducing aflatoxicosis. The animals were divided into 5 groups i.e (1) control group, (2) group treated with 0.4 mg/kg BH, (3) group treated with 0.4 mg/kg BH and 4% garlic extract in feed, (4) group treated with 5 mg/kg BH, and (5) group treated with 5.0 mg/kg BH and 4% garlic extract in feed. Body weight gains, eggs production, and the activity of glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT), and γ-glutamytransferase (γ- GT) enzymes were observed every week. The residue levels of the aflatoxin and metabolites were measured in the eggs using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results indicated that group treated with 0.4 mg AFB1/kg BH dan 5.0 mg AFB1/kg BH resulted in decreasing body weight gains, egg production, and increasing the level of GOT, GPT and γ-GT. The addition of 4% garlic extract in the feed was effective to improve the body weight gain and egg production only in the group of chicken treated with 0.4 mg AFB1/kg BH. However, it decreased the enzymes activities of the GOT, GPT, and γ-GT, as well as reduced the aflatoxin residues and metabolites in the groups at both aflatoxin levels (0.4 and 5.0 mg/kg BH). Aflatoxin residues decreased up to 42.2% for the group treated with the low dose of AFB1 (0.4 mg/kg) and 49.0% for the group treated with the high dose of AFB1 (5 mg/kg).   Key words: Garlic, aflatoxicosis, laying hens, aflatoxin residues
Histopathological features of Marek’s disease infections in broiler chicken in Districts of Tasikmalaya and Ciamis West Java Damayanti, R; Wiyono, A
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 8, No 4 (2003)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v8i4.398

Abstract

An outbreak of Marek’s disease was reported to occur in broiler chicken in Districts of Tasikmalaya and Ciamis. A total number of 58 tissues samples of broiler chicken were collected from 7 flocks of commercial broiler chicken farms in both Districts. The disease affected broiler chicken aged 17 to 24 days. Those chickens had been vaccinated to Newcastle Disease (ND) and at age of 10 days had been vaccinated to Gumboro using blended bursa of fabricius. Tissue samples were fixed in 10% of buffered neutral formalin (BNF) prior to haematoxilin and eosin (H and E) stain using standard procedures. Histopathological features show that out of 58 samples, 32 (55.2%) were infected by Marek’s Disease (19.0% were infected by Marek’s Disease, 20.1% were infected by Marek’s Disease and Gumboro, 16.1% Marek’s Disease and other infections), whereas 44.8% were infected by Gumboro alone or accompanied by other infections, ND and Colibasillosis. The study reveals that Marek’s Disease infection in broiler chicken tends to be mild i.e. infiltration of neoplastic cells (lymphoid, pleomorphic) in proventriculus, intestine, spleen, livers and bursa of fabricius. In addition to this, there were mild non-supurative inflammation in heart, lung, peripheral nerve and brain, as well as a severe demyelination in brain. It is concluded that the histopthological features confirm the diagnosis of Marek’s Disease.   Key words: Histopathology, Marek’s disease, broiler chicken, Districts of Tasikmalaya and Ciamis (West Java)
Characterization of Bacillus thuringiensis isolat from several areas in Java and South Sulawesi for biological control of myasis, Chrysomya bezziana Muharsini, S; Wardhana, April H; Rijzaani, H; Amirhusein, B
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 8, No 4 (2003)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v8i4.399

Abstract

Bacillus thuringiensis is a species of bacteria which has potential use for biological control of parasite. The aim of the study is to characterize the local isolate of B. thuringiensis using PCR technique. Primer of cry gen was used in the study. Two hundred and twenty seven soil samples were collected from several areas in Java Island and South Sulawesi Province. Samples were obtained from surrounding soils of animal housing and paddocks. Samples were inoculated in Nutrient Agar and the suspect of bacilli were then cultured in Luria Bertani acetic buffer. Seventy-three pure isolates of Bacillus thuringiensis were obtained. Thirty-five isolates from Bogor, Yogyakarta and Majalengka regencies were amplified using PCR and consisted of a B. thuringiensis sporulation gene which has a 850 bp band in an agarose gel. Amplification using cryIVA,B primers demonstrated four isolates contain a faint band of 800 bp and 12 isolates consist of a distinctive band of 300-400 bp. The results showed that several B. thuringiensis isolates containing a cry IV gen and those isolates are needed to be tested as a biological control agent for Chrysomya bezziana. Key words: Bacillus thuringiensis, Chrysomya bezziana, biological control, cry IV gen
Reliable preservation methods of mitochondrial DNA analysis for larvae and adult flies of Chrysomya bezziana (Diptera: Calliphoridae). Wardhana, April H; Muharsini, S; ., Suhardono
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 8, No 4 (2003)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v8i4.400

Abstract

The Old World Screwworm fly, Chrysomya bezziana is known as a myiasis agent in Indonesia. The aim of the study is to establish a reliable preservation methods for molecular analysis of insect. Cytochrom b (CB) and Cytochrome Oxidase sub unit I (COI) of mitochondrial DNA were used as markers. Drying method was used to preserve adult flies, while the larvae were kept in 10% formalin and 80% ethanol with or without soaked using hot water prior preservation. Two samples of each preservation were tested. Four primers were used to amplify samples using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). The PCR product were then purified and sequenced. Sequence data analysis of all samples suggested no differences between all preservation methods except using 10% formalin. Preservation samples using 10% formalin is not suitable for collecting mitochondrial DNA of insect. The best methods was using 80% ethanol with killed using hot water prior preservation. This method was able to extract a stabile mitochondrial DNA.   Key words: Chrysomya bezziana, preservation, formalin, ethanol, mitochondrial DNA
Eating behavior of Ongole crossbred and Limousin crossbred steers fed fermented rice straw and concentrate Purnomoadi, Agung; Bela, Agustina Wonga; Dartosukarno, Sularno
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 8, No 4 (2003)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v8i4.401

Abstract

A study on eating behavior of Ongole Crossbred (OC) and Limousin Crossbred (LC) steers (aged 9 months) fed fermented rice straw and concentrate has been carried out. Rice straw and concentrate were given in 60:40 ratio. Rice straw was fermented by commercial starter (BioP 2000 Z), while concentrate was composed of commercial concentrate and soybean pulp (by-product of soy-sauce industry). The diet was set to meet the dry matter (DM) requirement at 3.0% of liveweight. Eating behaviour was measured from 3 days continuously observation. Chewing number was accounted by halter equipped with tape-switch in jaw side and was recorded every 1/10 second in connected PC. The results showed that DMI of both OC (3.21 kg) and LC (4.18 kg) was similar, being 2.8% LW. However, chewing number of OC (133808 chews/d) was higher than that of LC (106353 chews/d). Chewing for eating and for rumination in OC (86995 and 46813 chews) was higher than of LC (67628 and 38725 chews). Chewing efficiency for eating in OC (0.041 g DMI/chew) was lower than that of LC (0.066 g DMI/chew). Similar tendency was observed in chewing efficiency for rumination that OC (0.080 g DMI/chew) was lower than that of LC (0.109 g DMI/chew). The conclusion is LC has a better chewing efficiency than of OC and it was pointed to different jaw size between OC and LC.   Key words: Chewing, Ongole, Limousin
The growth allometrically Mandalung and histological muscle fiber leg Sari, Meisji Liana
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 8, No 4 (2003): DECEMBER 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (129.038 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v8i4.395

Abstract

This study was conducted to compare the growth alometrically performance especially rate of muscle growth microscopically of Mandalung offspring of Muscovy x Duck (MD) and Duck x Muscovy (DM). Fifty-one Mandalung duck of IE and EI were used. They were fed with 2-type broiler commercial feed, which were starter type (day 1 – week 4) and finisher type (week 4 – week 12). Starter feed contained of 20% protein and 2800 kcal/kg energy while finisher feed contained of 18% protein and 3000 kcal/kg energy. Data on weights of slaughtered body and body parts (head, neck, fore back, rear back, breast, upper leg, lower leg, foot and its membrane) were measured at week 1, 4, 8 and 12. Diameter of muscle fiber was measured at age 8, 10 and 12 weeks, and each slaughter was represented by 1, 2 and 3 ducks. The results showed The growth direction was similar in IE and EI, initiated from head, to the neck, fore back and rear back, and from foot, to the thigh, breast and wings. Diameter of muscle fibers of Mandalung duck offspring of EI were larger (14,49 vs 13,37; 20,02 vs. 15, 24 μm; 23,68 vs. 18, 08 μm) than the IE.  Key words: Allometry, histological, muscle fiber

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