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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 19 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 8, No 3 (2003)" : 19 Documents clear
Utilization of plant bioactives as feed additives for poultry: The effect of Aloe vera gel and its extract on performance of broilers Sinurat, A.P; Purwadaria, T; Togatorop, M.H; Pasaribu, T
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 8, No 3 (2003)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (154.241 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v8i3.384

Abstract

Feed additives are commonly added in poultry feed as a growth promotant or to improve feed efficiency. The most common feed additive used is antibiotic at sub-therapheutic doses, although there is a controversy on its impact on human health. Previous results showed that Aloe vera gel could improve feed efficiency in broilers and an in vitro study showed that the extract have an antibacterial effect. Therefore, a further experiment was designed to study the response of broilers to Aloe vera gel or its extract as feed additives. Aloe vera was prepared in dry gel or chloroform-extract and included in the diet at levels of 0.25; 0.50 and 1.00 g/kg (equal to dry gel). Standard diets with or without antibiotic were also formulated as control and a commercial diet was included for comparison. The diets were fed to broilers from day old to 5 weeks. Each treatment has 9 replicates and 6chicks/replicate. Parameters observed were: feed consumption, weight gain and feed convertion ratios. Carcass yield, abdominal fat levels, relative weight of liver, gizzard, tractus digestivus and length of tractus digestivus were also measured at the end of feeding trial. The results showed that Aloe gel and its extract did not influence body weight gain and feed consumption of broilers significantly (P>0.05), but improved feed convertion slightly (3.50%). The response in this trial was similar as thosecommercial diet and diet added with antibiotic. There was no significant (P>0.05) effect of Aloe vera bioactives on carcass yield, abdominal fat level and relative weight of liver. However, Aloe vera gel and its extract tend to increase gizzard weight, gastro intestinal weight and length. The Aloe vera gel and its extract also reduced the total count of aerobic bacteria in the digesta of tractus digestivus. It is concluded that the Aloe vera gel improve feed efficiency in broilers by increasing the size of tractus digestivus and reducing the total count of aerobic bacteria in the gastro intestinal tract.   Key words: Aloe vera, feed additives, broilers, anti-bacteria
Fermented cassava waste and its utilization in broiler chickens rations ., Supriyati
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 8, No 3 (2003)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (127.918 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v8i3.385

Abstract

Cassava waste is a by-product of cassava flour industry and its amount is increasing following the increasing of cassava flour industry. Its utilization as a feedstuff, is limited by its low protein content. The cassava waste is only utilized as the energy source. One of the alternative technology in improving the utilization of cassava waste as a feedstuff, by improving the nutritive value through fermentation process. Fermentation was carried out by solid substrate fermentation using Aspergillus niger as an inoculant and mixing with urea and ammonium sulphate as inorganic nitrogen sources. The nutritive value of the product was evaluated by feeding trial using 144 “Shaver Stabro” strain 3 days old chicks with 3 treatments i.e. 0 (control), 5.0 and 10.0% fermented cassava waste. The results showed that the true protein content of fermented cassava increased from 2.2 to 18.4%. The inclusion of fermented cassava waste up to 10% in chicken broiler ration for 4 weeks feeding did not affect the feed consumption, bodyweight gain, FCR, weight of liver and gibblets. All parameter results from 10% inclusion were not significantly different (P>0.05) with the control (0% inclusion).   Key words: Fermentation, cassava waste, utilization, broiler chickens
Nutritive value of fermented palm oil sludge added with different sources of phosphorus Pasaribu, Tiurma; Arini, N; Purwadaria, T; Sinurat, A.P
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 8, No 3 (2003)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (160.1 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v8i3.386

Abstract

The experiment has been conducted to determine the nutritive value of palm oil sludge fermented with A. niger added with different sources of phosphorus (NPK, P2O5, NaH2PO4). The experiment was assigned in a factorial (3x3) design. The main factor was sources of phosphorus, while the sub factor was time of incubation (0, 4 days aerobic incubation, and 4 days aerobic incubation followed by 2 days anaerobic incubation). Parameters measured were pH, soluble nitrogen, true protein and crude protein, total α-amino acid (TAAA), soluble phosphorus and total phosphor, in vitro dry matter (DCBK), and true protein digestibilities (DCP). Results from the analyses showed that fermentation increased the contents of soluble and total P, protein and TAAA and the value of in vitro protein digestibility. Fermented product added with P2O5 had the highest in vitro dry matter digestibility, while the one added with NPK had true protein content and digestibility. It was concluded that additional NPK gave the best result interm of nutritive value.   Key words: Palm oil sludge, A. niger, phosphorus sources
Growth rate of rex, satin rabbits and their cross fed with lactosym@ in an intensive raising system Aritonang, Djamura; Roefiah, N.A Tul; Pasaribu, Tiurma; Raharjo, Yono C
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 8, No 3 (2003)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (148.18 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v8i3.387

Abstract

An experiment was conducted to study the effect of breed, level of lactosym and their interaction on the growth performance of three breeds of rabbit, i.e.: Rex, Satin and their Cross. Thirty three-six week old (weaning) rabbits were contribute in a 3 x 3 factorial used of completely randomized design having 3-5 individual replication and fed one out of three levels of lactosym (0, 0.25 and 0.50 ml/head/week). The two factors were: breed and level of lactosym. Result showed that there were no significant differences between breed (P>0,05) for body weight gain, feed intake and feed conversion. Body weight was affected by the level of lactosym (P<0,05). Increase of lactosym level decreased body weight gain. Feed conversion were not affected by the level of lactosym (P>0,05). Interaction between breed and level of lactosym did not affect body weight gain and feed conversion (P>0,05), but affected feed intake (P<0,05).   Key words: Productivity, rabbits, lactosym
Relative superiority analysis of Garut lamb and its crossbred Inounu, Ismeth; Hidayati, N; ., Subandriyo; Tiesnamurti, B; Nafiu, L.O
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 8, No 3 (2003)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (206.994 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v8i3.388

Abstract

The objective of the research was to evaluate the relative superiority of Garut lamb and its crosses with St. Croix and Moulton Charollais. The research was conducted at Animal Research Station, Indonesian Research Institute for Animal Production, Bogor, Indonesia. The data used for this paper was collected from 1995 to 2002. The results revealed that individual lamb weight at birth, at weaning, preweaning daily gain, at 6, 9 and 12 months of age of the composite sheep (HG = 50% St. Croix : 50% Garut, MG = 50% M. Charollais : 50% Garut, MHG (MG X HG) dan HMG (HG X MG) = 25% St. Croix : 25% M. Charollais : 50% Garut) were higher than Garut sheep. The relative superiority were 6.7-13.1% for lamb weight at birth, 6.6- 15.6% for lamb weight at weaning, 3.2-20.8% for preweaning daily gain dan 6.2-17.9% for lamb weight at 9 month of age, respectively. The superiority of composite sheep were obtained in good and limited feed condition. Lamb growth parameters were also affected by feed condition, parity, sex, and rearing type.   Key words: Garut, St. Croix, M. Charollais sheep, relative superiority
Bali cattle peBali cattle performance in the dry tropics of Sumbawarformance in the dry tropics of Sumbawa Panjaitan, Tanda; Fordyce, Geoffry; Poppi, Dennis
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 8, No 3 (2003)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (163.312 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v8i3.389

Abstract

Preliminary data on Bali cattle reproduction and growth presented is based on monitoring between August 2001 and August 2003 in the Sumbawa and Dompu Districts of Sumbawa Island, NTB. Sixty two % of calves were born between May and July inclusively. Inter-calving interval averaged 11.9 ±1.9 months; though recognized as an under-estimate, it still indicated of high fertility. Post-natal calf mortality was 5.3%. Birth, 6-, and 18-month weights of 14.2 ± 2.4 kg, 90 ± 20 kg, 172 ± 40 kg, respectively, were recorded. Average daily gains between birth to 6 months and from 6 to 18 months were 0.41 ± 0.11 and 0.23 ± 0.11 kg/d, respectively. Females reached mature size at 2.5-3.0 years at a mean weight of 237 kg and height of 1147 mm. Weight could be accurately predicted from chest girth: Weight (kg) = 7e0.0023 Chest girth (mm) (R2=0.9656). At the sites monitored, reproduction was high, and growth was typical for Bali cattle, indicating that these animals are well suited to the dry tropical environment of Sumbawa.   Key words: Bali, weight, cattle, tropic
Forage production systems in upland agriculture of Jratunseluna watershed Purwadiputra, Bambang R
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 8, No 3 (2003)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (165.934 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v8i3.390

Abstract

Study on forage potency at upland area of Jratunseluna watershed was conducted in three different agroecosystems. The locations represent deep soil area (volcanic) and shallow soil area (sediment) and three climate zones, namely zone B-2, C-2 and C-3. Data on forage production and food crops by-product were collected every month in a year. The result showed that there was different forage production between the deep soil and the shallow soil area. The forage production was also influenced by climate zone. The forage balance at each location shows that data collected once in a month was more meaningful on determination of surplus or deficit of forages compare to the one time data collection only. On the forage production, in dry matter as well as TDN, any single animal in volcanic area and B-3 climate zone got more forages compare to other location. On the other hand ruminants in sediment area with C-3 climate zone consumed forages below the demand line. In the sediment area, the number of ruminant depended on forage planted, but in volcanic area did not.   Key words: Forages, potency, volcanic soil, sediment soil
Genomic DNA restriction endonuclease from Pasteurella multocida isolated from Indonesia, katha strain and reference strains and analysed by PFGE ., Supar
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 8, No 3 (2003)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (276.968 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v8i3.391

Abstract

Pasteurella multocida strains are the causative disease agents of wide range of domestic and wild animals in Indonesia. The most important serotypes are associated with Hemorrhagic septicaemic (HS) diseases in cattle and buffaloes, cholera in ducks and chickens. The HS disease associated with P. multocia in large ruminants in Indonesia is controled by killed whole cell vaccines produced by the use of P. multocida Katha strains. There is no discriminatory data of the molecular biology technique has been applied to investigate P. multocida isolates from different geographic locations in Indonesia. The purpose of this studies were to observe the genetic diversity among P. multocida isolated from various geograpic locations and compared with Katha vaccine strain and other reference strains. A total samples of 38 isolates and strains of P. multocida were analysed by means of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Each sample was grown in nutrient broth, cells were separeted by centrifugation. Whole cell pellet was mixed with agarose and then prepared agarose plugs. The genomic DNA of each sample was digested in situ (plug) with either restriction endonuclease of ApaI and/or BamHI. The digested genomic DNA of each sample was analysed by PFGE, the genomic DNA restricted profile of each sample was compared with others. The use of ApaI restriction endonuclease digestion and analysed by PFGE, demonstrated that 34 out of 38 P. multocia samples could be differentiated into 16 ApaI types, whereas based on the BamHI digestion of these samples were differentiated into 20 BamHI types. Genomic DNA restriction pattern of Indonesian P. multocida isolates originated from cattle and buffaloes associated with haemorrhagic septicaemic diseases demonstrated different pattern to those of vaccine Katha strain, poultry strains as well as the reference strains currenly kept at Balitvet Culture Collection (BCC) unit. Two P. multocida isolates derived from ducks with cholera disease showed similar pattern support the previous findings which exhibited similar pathogecity and vaccine protection. The majority of HS causing P. multocida isolates from some provinces in Indonesia belong to ApaI type 1 (7 isolates), six of these isolates belong to BamHI type 1. The BamHI restriction endonuclease digestion demonstrated higher discriminatory than that of ApaI. These restrection endonucleases digestion combined with PFGE analysis were effective for molecullar defferentiation of P. multocida strains and could be applied to other bacterial veterinary pathogens as well as for local isolate vaccine sellection.   Key words: Pasteurella multocida, restriction endonuclease analysis, genomic DNA, PFGE
Wool characteristic of Priangan sheep and its crossbred Syamyono, Ono; Inonou, I; Yamin, M
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 8, No 3 (2003)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v8i3.392

Abstract

The aim of this research was to identify wool characteristic of Priangan sheep (G) and its crossbred with St. Croix (H) and M. Charolais (M). The parameters observed included yield, fiber length, fiber diameter, percentage of shrink during processing, yarn production, strength and elasticity of the yarn. Eighteen rams of Priangan, HMG and MHG crossbred were used. Completely Randomized Design with 6 replications and One Way analyses were used in data analysing, except for strength and yarn elasticity, 10 replication were used. The results show that breed had no significant effect (P>0.05) on yield, diameter of fine fiber, and shrinking percentage during separation and carding process. In contrast, breed had significant effect on fiber length (P<0.01) and on coarse fiber diameter, the shrink, strength and yarn elasticity (P<0.05). In general, the wool of HMG and MHG crossbred had better quality compared to Priangan sheep, although yarn production was higher in Priangan sheep.   Key words: Wool, Priangan sheep, crossbred
Wool characteristic of Priangan sheep and its crossbred syamyono, ono; Inounu, I.; Yamin, M.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 8, No 3 (2003)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v8i3.1105

Abstract

The aim of this research was to identify wool characteristic of Priangan sheep (G) and its crossbred with St. Croix (H) andM. Charolais (M). The parameters observed included yield, fiber length, fiber diameter, percentage of shrink during processing,yarn production, strength and elasticity of the yarn. Eighteen rams of Priangan, HMG and MHG crossbred were used.Completely Randomized Design with 6 replications and One Way analyses were used in data analysing, except for strength andyarn elasticity, 10 replication were used. The results show that breed had no significant effect (P>0.05) on yield, diameter of finefiber, and shrinking percentage during separation and carding process. In contrast, breed had significant effect on fiber length(P<0.01) and on coarse fiber diameter, the shrink, strength and yarn elasticity (P<0.05). In general, the wool of HMG and MHGcrossbred had better quality compared to Priangan sheep, although yarn production was higher in Priangan sheep.Key words: Wool, Priangan sheep, crossbred

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