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Ahmadi Riyanto
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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 8 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 8, No 1 (2003): MARCH 2003" : 8 Documents clear
The estimation of genetic distance and discriminant variables on breed of duck (Alabio, Bali, Khaki Campbell, Mojosari and Pegagan) by morphological analysis Brahmantiyo, B; Prasetyo, L.H; Setioko, A.R; Mulyono, R.H
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 8, No 1 (2003): MARCH 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (153.177 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v8i1.367

Abstract

A study on morphological body conformation of Alabio, Bali, Khaki Campbell, Mojosari and Pegagan ducks was carried out to determine the genetic distance and discriminant variables. This research was held in Research Institute for Animal Production, Ciawi, Bogor using 65 Alabio ducks, 40 Bali ducks, 36 Khaki Campbell ducks, 60 Mojosari ducks and 30 Pegagan ducks. Seven different body parts were measured, they were the length of femur, tibia, tarsometatarsus, the circumference of tarsometatarsus, the length of third digits, wing and maxilla. General Linear Models and simple discriminant analysis were used in this observation (SAS package program). Male and female Pegagan ducks had morphological size bigger than Alabio, Bali, Khaki Campbell and Mojosari ducks. Khaki Campbell ducks were mixed with Bali ducks (47.22%) and Pegagan ducks from isolated location in South Sumatera were lightly mixed with Alabio and Bali. Mahalanobis genetic distance showed that Bali and Khaki Campbell ducks, also, Alabio and Mojosari ducks had similarity, with genetic distance of 1.420 and 1.548, respectively. Results from canonical analysis showed that the most discriminant variables were obtained from the length of femur, tibia and third digits.   Key words: Duck, genetic distance, morphological
Optimation of β-mannanase production on submerged culture of Eupenicillium javanicum as well as pH and temperature enzyme characterizations Purwadaria, T; Haryati, T; Frederick, E; Tangendjaja, B
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 8, No 1 (2003): MARCH 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (171.798 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v8i1.372

Abstract

Two successive experiments were conducted to determine the optimal substrate concentration of coconut meal (CM) and incubation time for production of β-mannanase from Eupenicillium javanicum. Both experiments were designed based on factorial. In the first experiment, the main factor was substrate concentration of 1, 2, and 3%, while the sub-factor was incubation time of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 days. The two factors were interacted highly significantly (P<0.01). Since the highest β- mannanase activity, protein concentration and saccharification activity towards coconut meal were obtained from 3% CM after five day incubation time (P<0.05), the second experiment was designed for higher substrate concentration. The main factor was also substrate concentration of 3, 4 and 5%, while the sub factor was incubation time of 5 and 6 days. The two factors were also interacted highly significantly (P<0.01) for mannanase activity and protein concentration, while specific activity was not significantly different (P>0.05). The best activity was obtained at 4% of coconut meal for five day incubation time, which was not significantly different with that of 3% at the same incubation time. Therefore, it was concluded from both experiments that the best enzyme production was obtained from 3% of coconut meal at incubation time of 5 days. Then, further experiments show that the enzyme had optimum pH at the range of 5.4-5.8, the same pH range in duodenum, while at pH 4.5 the activity was relatively low. Although, at pH 4.5 the enzyme activity was reduced, the enzyme was still active for four hours. At pH 5.8 and 6.5 the enzyme was quite stable. The optimum temperature of the enzyme was at 500C, higher than the body temperature of most poultry (400C). The reduction of enzyme activity at 400C could be overcome by increasing the enzyme concentration. The enzyme was stable after 4 hour incubation at 28 (room temperature) and 400C, however, the enzyme activity was considerably reduced at temperature of 900C after 60 second incubation. In the poultry digestion system the activity is not affected by temperature, but in the pelleting process where the steam temperature approximately 900C has to be limited for not more than 30 seconds.   Key words: Coconut meal, β-mannanase, Eupenicillium javanicum, pH and temperature characterization
Intake and digestibility of untreated and urea treated rice straw base diet fed to sheep Yulistiani, D; Gallagher, J.R; Barneveld, R.J. Van
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 8, No 1 (2003): MARCH 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (170.465 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v8i1.368

Abstract

Rice straw as one of agricultural by-products has low quality due to low content of essensial nutrients like protein, energy, minerals and vitamin as well as poor palatability and digestibility. Therefore, the quality of rice straw needs to be improved in order to increase its utilization by gastrointestinal tract of ruminants. The purpose of this study is to compare untreated and urea treated rice straw as basal diets for sheep. Twelve mature Merino wethers (average body weight 53.62 + 3.44 kg) were separated into 4 groups based on their live weight with each groups assigned three diets, that are: diet 1 untreated rice straw with high forage legume content, diet 2 urea ensiled rice straw and diet 3 rice straw sprayed with urea solution at feeding time. Diets were allocated based on a randomized complete block design. Urea ensiled rice straw was prepared by spraying chopped straw with urea solution to yield straw containing 4% urea and 40% moisture, then kept in air tight polythylene bags for 6 weeks. The untreated, ensiled and urea supplemented rice straw were mixed with other feed ingredients to provide isoenergetic and isonitrogenous diets. Diets were formulated to meet maintenance requirement according to NRC. Sheep were adapted to experimental diets for 15 days, and after adaptation period, a metabolism trial was conducted. Results reveal that dry matter intake permetabolic body weight (DMI/W0.75), DE (digestible energi) intake and apparent digestibility of NDF (neutral detergent fibre) were not significantly different between diet 1 and diet 2. Apparent digestibility of DM (dry matter), OM (organic matter), and ADF (acid detergent fibre), as well as N retention were not significantly different between three diets. Positive result in N retention was only observed in diet 2, while others were negative. It may be concluded from this study that untreated rice straw basal diet supplemented with forage legume offer an alternative method other than urea ensiled for improving the nutritional value of rice straw as a ruminant feed on small farmer.   Key words: Rice straw, urea treated, digestibility, and sheep
Clostridial necrotic enteritis: field cases and the role of vaccination against coccidiosis to the incidence in broiler chicken Natalia, Lily; Priadi, A
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 8, No 1 (2003): MARCH 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (165.073 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v8i1.373

Abstract

A study of necrotic enteritis in broiler chicken was carried out in West Java. Isolates of highly toxigenic C. perfringens of type C were isolated from field cases of necrotic enteritis which most frequently occured in chicken with vaccine-inducedcoccidial lesions. Experimental study in broiler chicken was conducted to determine the predisporing factor for necroric enteritis. Three possible factors were evaluated, those were feeding with high animal protein ingreadients, vaccination with live attenuated anticoccidial vaccine, and feeding with spores of C. perfringens type A and C. The occurrence of intestinal coocidial leions in chicks vaccinated with life attenuated anticoccidial vaccine was demonstrated. The highest mortality and the significant intestinal lesions of chickens were observed in group treated with live attenuated anticoccidial vaccine and C. perfringens type A and C spores (P<0.01). From the experiment, it was found that vaccine induced-coccidial lesions and C. perfringens type A and C were the predisposing factors of necrotic enteritis. These results suggest that the concurrent infection with coccidia and C. perfringens has a synergistic effect on mortality and intestinal lesions in necrotic enteritis.   Key words : Clostridial necrotic enteritis, broiler chicken, coccidiosis
Milk production capacity of priangan prolific sheep: II. The lactation curve Tiesnamurti, B; Inounu, I; ., Subandriyo; Martojo, H
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 8, No 1 (2003): MARCH 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (159.545 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v8i1.369

Abstract

A calculation was made for the lactation curve of Priangan sheep using Wood equation to find out how much differences actual milk production of uncorrected ewes compared to those corrected using parity and litter size born. Milk production was measured using weighing of the lambs before and shortly after suckling, with average of daily and total milk production were 519.5 g/head and 43.6 kg head-1 lactation-1, respectively. The average of parameter a, which reflected milk production at the beginning of the lactation period was 6.296 that equivalent to 571.5 g/head and significantly affected (P<0.05) by parity. The b parameter which reflected the rate of milk increment at the beginning of the lactation period was found to be 0.528 and significantly affected (P<0.05) by parity. The c parameter which reflected the rate of milk decline at the end of lactation period was found to be -0.20 and significantly affected (P<0.05) by parity. The average persistency which reflected the duration of maximum milk production was found to be 22.58 days without any significant contribution of parity and the number of lamb born. The average time to reach maximum milk production was found to be at week 3.5 after lambing without any significant contribution of parity and litter size. The average estimation of maximum milk production was 708.4 g/head and significantly affected (P<0.05) by ewe parity.   Key words: Milk production, lactation curve, Priangan sheep
Epidemiology of Japanese–B– encephalitis infection in pigs in Riau and North Sumatera Provinces Sendow, Indrawati; Syafriati, Tatty; Hadi, Upik Kesumawati; Malole, Martin; Soviana, Susi; ., Darminto
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 8, No 1 (2003): MARCH 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (157.336 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v8i1.374

Abstract

Epidemiology study on Japanese-B-Encephalitis (JE) was conducted in Riau and North Sumatera Provinces. A total of 190 pig sera from Riau Province and 164 pig sera from North Sumatera were tested using competitive ELISA (C-ELISA) to detect antibodies against JE virus. Insect collection was also conducted using several methods near pig farms in those provinces and identified into species to gain more information on its role to distribute JE infection. Serological results indicated that 70% pig in Sumatera and 94% pig in Riau had antibodies against JE virus. The highest prevalence of reaktor was detected in pig of more than 4 months age in both Provinces. The results of insect collection showed that Culex tritaeniorchynchus and Culex quinquefasciatus were the most dominant species in both provinces. Based on serological testing, indicated that JE virus infected pig in Sumatera and Riau Provinces, and higher reactor was obtained in older pig. Culex tritaeniorchynchus and Culex quinquefasciatus were the dominant insect species in both provinces, hence those species had a possibility to play an important role of JE transmission.   Key words: JE, pigs, serology, insects
Strategic study on energy-protein requirements for local sheep: 5. Ewes during lactation phase Mathius, I-W; Sastradipradja, D; Sutardi, T; Natasasmita, A; Sofyan, L.A; Sihombing, D.T.H
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 8, No 1 (2003): MARCH 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (205.531 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v8i1.370

Abstract

Thirty-six Javanese thin-tail ewes in the end of late pregnancy phase were set out to study the energy and crude protein requirements during the first eight-week of lactation phase. The ewes were penned individually in doors and randomly assigned to a 3 x 3 factorial arrangement, consisting of three levels of energy (low, medium and high) and three levels of crude protein (low, medium and high) diets with four ewes per treatment. The diets were pelleted and offered four times daily in approximately equal amount. Feed intake, nutrient digestibility, body weight and milk production were recorded. Results showed that, total lamb birth weights was not affected, but protein content on the ration treatments significantly altered (P<0.05) milk yield and composition. Dry matter intake due to feeding treatments was not significantly affected (P>0.05), while crude protein content on the ration highly significantly affected (P<0.01). Based on data recorded, the energy and protein requirements for ewes during lactation phase are highly significantly depended on ewes’ live weight, milk production and the ratio of energy metabolism and crude protein of the ration. It was concluded that in order to fulfil the crude protein and energy needs of the ewes during lactation phase, the ration given should contain crude protein and energy as much as 16% (based on dry matter) and 13.4 MJ/kg dry matter respectively.   Key words: Energy-protein requirement, lactation phase, local ewes  
Superovulation in different buffalo genotypes Situmorang, Polmer
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 8, No 1 (2003): MARCH 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (134.123 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v8i1.371

Abstract

Studies has been conducted to evaluate the response of different buffaloes genotype to superovulation treatments. PSMG (2500 IU) was injected intra muscular in a single injection on day 10 of estrus cycle while a total of 12 ml Folltropin was administrated twice a day with 12 hours interval in a decreasing doses for 4 days (2.5; 2.5; 2.0; 2.0; 1.0; 1.0 and 0.5; 0.5 ml). Embryos were collected by non-surgically technique on day 6 of estrus cycle by flushing each horn of uterus with 500 ml Dubelcos Phosphat Buffer Saline (DBPS). Diameter of ovary (DO), total corpora lutea (TCL), total embryo (TE) and percentage of recovery rate (% RR) were recorded as parameters. Administration of hormone highly significantly (P<0.01) affected the ovulation response of buffalo. The mean DO was highly significantly higher (P<0.01) in PMSG than that in Folltropin (9.5 vs 4.4 cm), but TCL, TE and % RR were significantly lower (P<0.01) in PMSG (2.0; 0.0 and 0.0 vs 5.5; 2.6 and 43.7). The mean DO was significantly higher (P<0.05) in river than both in swamp and crosses (6.0 vs 4.3 and 3.3 cm). No significantly differentwas observed between the mean DO of swamp and crosses. TCL, TE and % RR were not statistically significant among different buffalo genotype. The mean of TCL, TE and % RR were 6.2, 2.5 and 48.0; 5.8; 2.3 and 40.0 and 5.7; 3.3 and 52.8 for river, swamp and crosses buffalo, respectively. Both left and right ovary gave a similar response to superovulation treatments. In onclusion, the response of a different buffalo genotypes following superovulation with Folltropin was not significant.  Key words: Superovulation, buffalo, genotype, embryo

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