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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 22 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 7, No 4 (2002)" : 22 Documents clear
The effect adding layer manure in ration as alternative feed on pig production Sinaga, Saulan; Silalahi, Marsudi
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 7, No 4 (2002)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (146.973 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i4.296

Abstract

An experiment had been conducted to find out the effect of layer manure in the ration pig. Twenty four pig were randomized into 24 individual pens. Completely Randomized Design was used in this experiment; treatments consist of four levels of layer manure (0; 5; 10 and 15%), each treatment was replicated six times. The result indicated that up to 5% layer manure add to the starter-grower diet can be fed without any significant effect.   Key words: Layer manure, starter-grower period
Feeding of Aspergillus oryzae fermentation culture (AOFC) to growing sheep: 2. Growth rate and feed efficiency Lubis, D; Haryanto, B; Wina, E; Sugiharyantatmo, T
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 7, No 4 (2002)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (157.362 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i4.297

Abstract

Utilization of yeast and or filamentous fungi as feed additive to ruminants has been of interest since the late 1980’s. Two fungi species have been commercially produced in the United States, (1) Yea-Sacc containing living cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and (2) Amaferm bearing Aspergillus oryzae fermentation extract. It has been demonstrated and proven that the cultures can enhance rumen development and function in young ruminants. This paper concerns the use of Aspergillus oryzae fermentation culture (AOFC) as feed additive for young-growing male ‘Garut’ sheep. The A. oryzae was cultured in a media made of mineral-enriched ‘onggok’ flour, a material of tapioca processing waste. The AOFC was prepared gradually by incubating the fungus at room temperature (26 – 300C) for 5 days, dried at 400C and ground. The AOFC was added to a commercial concentrate (GT-03) at 0, 5 and 10% (w/w) levels, as treatment C0 (control), C1, and C2, respectively. Fifteen growing ‘Garut’ sheep were used and the concentrate feed treatments were randomly allotted based on a randomized block design. Drinking water was available at all time. The amount of feed offered (chopped King grass and concentrates) and their refusals were weighed daily and live-weight of sheep was measured once a week in the morning. Daily feces was collected and weighed in the last 10 days of the 14-week experimental period. All feed and fecal samples were analyzed for dry matter, crude protein, total fiber (NDF), and ash. AOFC supplementation resulted in higher weight gains (P<0.05), which were 94.81; 122.08; and 140.52 g/d for C0, C1, and C2 treatments, respectively. Dry and organic matter, as well as protein intake was also significantly increased by inclusion of AOFC into concentrate diet (P<0.05). The increment in nutrient intake was from increased consumption of concentrates, and not from King grass, however, there was no effect of AOFC supplementation on feed efficiency.   Key words: A. oryzae, sheep, gain, efficiency
Milk production capacity of prolific Priangan sheep: Preweaning performance Tiesnamurti, Bess; Inonou, Ismeth; ., Subandriyo
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 7, No 4 (2002)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (172.074 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i4.298

Abstract

A study was conducted to investigate the milk production capacity and preweaning performance of the prolific Priangan sheep, at sheep breeding station of the Research Institute for Animal production, Bogor using 126 ewes during three lambing periods in three consecutive years. The milk production was estimated weekly, started at day 7 after lambing date, till lambs were weaned at 90 days of age. The results showed that total milk production was significantly affected (P<0.05) by parity and the number of lambs born with average daily milk production of 519.5 g head-1 day-1. Estimated total milk production was 43.6 kg/lactation (N = 126; SD = 7.8; CV = 19.4%; range = 28.7-53.6 kg). According to the dam parity, the highest milk production was estimated at third parity (40.1 kg head-1 lactation-1), whereas on the basis of litter size, ewes with twin born lamb had the highest production (39.9 kg head-1 lactation-1). The preweaning lamb performance (weaning weight and preweaning daily gain) was significantly affected (P<0.05) by ewe parity, sex, litter size and type of birth and weaned, with the average weaning weight of 10.62 kg (N = 208; SD = 3.37; CV = 25.08%) and 130.9 + 41.8 g head-1 day-1 (N = 208; SD = 33.5; CV = 31.26%), respectively. Where as lamb birth weight was significantly affected (P<0.05) by ewe parity, sex and the number of lambs bornwith average of 2.39 kg (N = 208; SD = 0.66; CV =        9.8%).   Key words: Milk production, prolific sheep, preweaning performance
The effect of cryoprotectant and equilibration period on quality and fertility of duck and muscovy sperm Setioko, A.R; Situmorang, P; Triwulanningsih, E; Sugiarti, T; Kusumaningrum, D.A
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 7, No 4 (2002)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (139.119 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i4.299

Abstract

The study was conducted to evaluate the effect of cryoprotectant and equilibration period on quality and fertility of duck and muscovy spermatozoa. Semen collected from Alabio and muscovy drakes was diluted using three different cryoprotectants:glycerol, DMSO and DMF, thereafter the semen was equilibrated 50C for 15; 30 and 60 minutes then frozen and stored in liquid nitrogen, designed by factorial 3 x 3. After thawing, semen sample was investigated on the motility and mortality rate. The best cryoprotectant and equilibration period was used in fertilization test. Duration of fertility was calculated from the second day after insemination until the last fertile egg, and the percent of fertility was calculated from the second day until the forth day after insemination. The use of cryoprotectant significantly affected sperm motility after freezing. The use of glycerol as a cryoprotectant was the lowest (P<0.05) compared to DMSO and DMF. Similarly, duck sperm motility after being freezed with glycerol, DMF and DMSO were 9.02; 21.75, and 32.86%, and for muscovy sperm motility were 11.78; 32.45 and 34.92% respectively. The percentage of live sperm for duck were 23.84; 40.14 and 42.20, while for muscovy were 29.26; 53.06 and 51.80 respectively after being freezed with glycerol, DMF and DMSO. Equilibration period did not affect the percentage of live sperm after freezing. Results of this study showed that duration of fertility of Alabio duck after being inseminated with fresh drake semen was longest compared to that of insemination using fresh muscovy semen, frozen drake semen and frozen muscovy semen (4.96 vs 3.5; 2.4 and 1.5 days respectively). Results from this study clearly indicated that preservation of sperm reduced the quality of spermatozoa. It is suggested that freezing technique of both duck and Muscovy sperm could be conducted using DMF or DMSO as a cryoprotectant with the equilibration period between 15 to 60 minutes.   Key words: Sperm, cryoprotectant, fertility, AI, duck, muscovy
Effect of cryoprotectant and its level to survivability of drake semen D.A, Kusumaningrum; Situmorang, P; Setioko, A.R; Sugiarti, T; Triwulanningsih, E; Sianturi, R.G
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 7, No 4 (2002)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (139.333 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i4.300

Abstract

This study was conducted at Laboratory Reproduction of Physiology, Research Institute of Animal Production. The experiment was factorial design with two kinds of cryoprotectant (DMF and DMA) as the first factor and two levels of them (7 and 9%) as the second factor. This study was invented to determine the effect of cryoprotectant and its level to survivability of drake semen. Sperm was collected from fifteen drakes two times per week using artivicial vagina. Only the best quality of sperm was used in this study. Collected sperm was diluted in medium to get concentration of 400 x 106 per ml. Equilibrated at 50C in mini straw (0.25 ml) for 60 minutes, then kept them up 8 cm above the LN2 for 4 minutes before plunged in LN2. Parameters measured of this study were survability of drake semen after diluted, at 50C and after freezing-thawing at 350C for 30 seconds. Result of this study showed that percentage of motility and percentage of live sperm were significant different (P<0.05) between DMA (33.24 and 42.03) and DMF (25.82 and 34.30). Level of cryoprotectant (7 and 9%) were not significant different. Based on this study, using DMA as cryoprotectan with 7% in medium was better than that of DMF.   Key words: Cryoprotectan, survivability, drake sperm
The effects of cholesterol on the viability and fertility of bull spermatozoa Situmorang, Polmer
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 7, No 4 (2002)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (145.024 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i4.301

Abstract

This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of cholesterol on the viability and fertility of chilled and deep-frozen bull spermatozoa. Semen was collected by means of artificial vagina, diluted in Tris-Citrat diluent and cooled to 50C for 60 minutes. Following an equiliberation for 4 hours, semen was frozen at 5 cm above surface of liquid nitrogen for 10 minutes. The experiment was 2 x 3 factorial designed with two level of egg yolk (10 and 20% v/v) and 3 level of cholesterol (0; 0.5 and 1.0 mg/ml). The viability of spermatozoa was evaluated after the temperature reduced to 50C, stored at 50C for 1, 3 and 7 days and after thawing. For fertility test, cows were artificially inseminated (AI) using chilled and frozen semen on the onset or 6 hours of oestrus. Rectal palpation was conducted 3 months after AI to determine the pregnancy. The percentages motile of chilled semen was higher in 0.5 mg/ml than those of 0.0 or 1.0 mg/ml cholesterol but this difference was not significant. After thawing, the effects of cholesterol on the percentage motile was significant (P<0.05). The mean percentage motile was 47.5; 51,5 and 56.0 for 0.0; 0.5 and 1.0 mg/ml cholesterol respectively. The percentage of live sperm and intact apical ridge was higher in cholesterol however this effects was not significant. The effects level of egg yolk and its interaction with cholesterol on the viability was not significant. The percentage of pregnant was higher in 1.0 mg/ml and the mean percentage of pregnant was 45.8; 48.2 and 55.7 for 0.0; 0.5 and 1.0 mg/ml cholesterol respectively. Percentage of pregnant was higher for chilled semen than those of frozen semen (54.3 vs 45.5). In conclusion the addition of 1 mg/ml cholesterol increase the percentage of motile after thawing and pregnancy of cows inseminated with chilled and frozen semen.   Key words: Semen, viability, cholesterol, pregnan
Effect of biofertilizer and chemical fertilizer on growth and production of Panicum maximum Suratmini, Ni Putu; ., Supriyati; Heliati, I; Kompiang, I.P
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 7, No 4 (2002)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (139.694 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i4.302

Abstract

A glass-house experiment was conducted to study the effect of biofertilizer, chemical fertilizer and their combinations on the growth and production of Panicum maximum. Four cultivars of Panicum maximum were used, namely cv. Riversdale, cv. Petrie, cv. Natsukaze and cv. Natsuyukata. The grasses were planted in Latosol soil. The treatments with 3 replicates were: (1) control, (2) urea 100 kg N/ha, (3) biofertilizer 10 l/ha and (4) urea 50 kg N/ha + biofertilizer 10 l/ha. The grass was harvested every 40 days for 10 times and data was polled. The average production of grass for cv. Riversdale was 20.0 pols, height was 77.2 cm, fresh weight was 40.5 g and dry weight was 9.0 g. The average production of grass for cv. Petrie was 36.4 pols, height was 63.9 cm, fresh weight was 42 g and dry weight was 9.2 g. The average production of grass for cv. Natsukaze was 28.6 pols, height was 67.2 cm, fresh weight was 40.7 g and dry weight was 9.2 g. The average production of grass for cv. Natsuyukata was 36.9 pols, height was 74.9 cm, fresh weight was 45.3 g and dry weight was 9.7 g. The average production of treatment (I) were 17.2 pols, height 59.7 cm, fresh 11.4 g and dry weight 2.6 g. The average production of treatment (2) were 22.8 pols, height 61.1 cm, fresh 19.3 g and dry weight 4.2 g. The average production of treatment (3) were 40.3 pols, height 82.5 cm, fresh 71.6 g and dry weight 14.9 g. The average production of treatment (4) were 41.4 pols, height 79.9 cm, fresh weight 66.1 g and dry weight 14.5 g. Biofertilizer significantly increased number of pols, height, fresh and dry weights grass production.   Key words: Biofertilizer, chemical fertilizer, production, Panicum maximum
Dermatopathology of Caprine Scabies and Protective Immunity in Sensitised Goats Against Sarcoptes scabiei Reinfestation Tarigan, Simson
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 7, No 4 (2002)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (228.643 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i4.303

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare macroscopic dermatopathology in naïve and sensitised goats, and to assess protective immunity possessed by sensitised goats against Sarcoptes scabiei challenge. Eighteen goats were allocated evenly into 3 groups; group 1 sensitised with the mite twice, group 2 once and group 3 was not sensitised (naïve). Sensitisation was done by infesting goats with the mites on the auricle and infestation was allowed to progress for 7 weeks, then the goats were treated with Ivermectin to obtain complete recovery. After sensitisation, all sensitised and naïve goats were infested with the mites on the auricles. Infestation in the sensitised goat caused severe immediate hypersensitivity that resulted in severe peracute pustular dermatitis. After one week, however, the lesion waned slowly. At 7 weeks post infestation, the remnant of lesion could only be perceived by palpation on the primary site of infestation as a mild papular dermatitis. Infestation on the naïve goats, in contrast, produced slowly progressing lesions which at 7-week post infestation, it ended up with severe crusted scabies affecting almost the whole skin. Antigens responsible for the immediate hypersensitivity which are supposedly contained in the mite secretions or excretions are immunologically protective but unlikely to have the capacity to induce a complete protection against mite challenge in immunised animals. This notion is based on the fact obtained from this study that goats sensitised twice did not possess a higher immune protection against mite challenge than goats sensitised once.   Key words: Sarcoptes scabiei var. caprae, sensitisation, protective immunity, immediate hypersensitive
THALIB, A. 2002. Effect of additional of microbial growth factors combined with and without microbe preparate on growth performance of Etawah-cross goat. JITV 7(4): 220-226. thalib, Amlius
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 7, No 4 (2002)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i4.1101

Abstract

Effect of microbial growth factors (FPM) combined with and without microbe preparate (SM) on growth of Etawah-crossgoat has been conducted for 14 weeks, including 2 weeks of adaptation period. Animals used were 24 male goats of Etawahcross (PE) with a mean liveweight of 17.73 ± 1.80 kg. The animals were randomly distributed into 3 treatment groups. Eachgroup consisted of 8 animals. All animals were fed elephant grass (ad lib.) + concentrate containing 16% crude protein (1.0% oflive weight) as basal diet. The treatment groups were : I. Control (K); II. K + FPM; III. K + SM + FPM. Measurements recordedwere: feed consumption, average daily gain (ADG), dry matter digestibility (in vitro and in vivo DMDs), as well as rumenecosystem. All animals were placed in metabolism cages for 2 weeks for determination of in vivo DMD. The results showed thatFPM combined with and without SM improved the performance of both rumen ecosystem and host animals. Compared tocontrol, combination of FPM with SM increased the following parameters significantly (P<0.05): ADG (55 vs. 36 g); DMI (645vs. 609 g head-1 day-1); in vivo DMD (74 vs. 69%); FCR (12 vs. 17); in vitro DMD (49 vs. 46%); colony number of bacteria percell number of protozoa (3.09 x 104 vs. 1.12 x 104); VFA content (3.53 vs. 2.82 mg ml-1); NH3-N content (68 vs. 56 mg l-1); pH(6.78 vs. 6.65). Microbe preparate enhanced the effect of FPM on VFA content so that the combination of FPM and SM(treatment III) significantly increased the VFA content as compared to the control (P<0.05).Key words: Microbial growth factor, microbe preparate, etawah-cross goat
SENDOW, I. 2002. Isolation of bluetongue serotypes 1, 6 and 21 from insects in West Java. JITV 7(4): 272-278 sendow, indrawati
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 7, No 4 (2002)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i4.1102

Abstract

Bluetongue virus is one of arbovirus diseases which is transmitted by insects, Culicoides spp. Insect collection wasconducted weekly from 1991 to 1993 and forthnightly from 1993 to 1997 in West Java using Pirbright-type miniature light trapin to phosphate buffered saline for identification and viral isolation. A total of 1155 pools of insects were inoculated intoembryonated chicken eggs before passaging in a mosquito cell line and three times blind passages in BHK-21 cells. Fourteenpools of insects produced cytopathic effect in BHK-21 cells. Four of the infected BHK-21 cells reacted in the antigen captureELISA test using a specific monoclonal antibody to bluetongue (BTV) virus. Further identification into serotype in ReferenceLaboratory, indicated that BTV serotype 1 was isolated from C. fulvus, BTV serotype 6 was isolated from C. peregrinus andBTV serotype 21 from pools of C. shortii and C. orientalis.Key words: Bluetongue viruses, isolation, insects

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