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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
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Search results for , issue " Vol 7, No 3 (2002): SEPTEMBER 2002" : 10 Documents clear
Feeding Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Culture (AOFC) to Growing Sheep: 1. The Effect of AOFC on Rumen Fermentation Lubis, Darwinsyah; Wina, Elizabeth; Haryanto, Budi; Suhargiyantatmo, T
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 7, No 3 (2002): SEPTEMBER 2002
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (176.335 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i3.289

Abstract

Cultures of fungi, especially Aspergillus oryzae, have been of interest to animal nutritionists to increase feed efficiency. Many experiments have been done and showed positive results on rumen fermentation and productivity of ruminants. This paper reports the results of an in vivo study on feeding Aspergillus oryzae, fermentation culture (AOFC) to growing sheep. ‘Onggok’ (tapioca processing waste) was used as media for AO cultivation after being enriched with a mineral mixture. Commercial concentrate (GT-03) was fed to 15 growing sheep supplemented with 0% (C0), 5% (C1), and 10% (C2) AOFC (w/w). Chopped fresh King grass was used as a basal diet. The 3 treatments were randomly allotted to the sheep according to randomized block design with 5 replications. The study was carried out for 14 weeks. Digestion trial was conducted in the last 10 days of experiment. All feed and fecal samples were analyzed for nutrients. Rumen fluid was sampled at the mid experimental period. Analyses were done on rumen pH, ammonia content, (VFA) volatile fatly acids concentration, and also total digestive tract digestibility of dry and organic matter, crude protein, and total fiber (NDF). Differences in treatment means were analyzed by Duncan’s MRT. Feeding AOFC resulted in increased (P<0.05) digestibility of crude protein from 59.6% in control sheep to 65.5% in sheep fed concentrate with 10% AOFC supplementation. The same pattern also occurred for NDF, but no effect was found on dry and organic matter. Higher fiber digestibility with AOFC supplementation was in line with an increase (P<0.05) in cellulolytic bacteria population in the rumen. VFA produced also increased (P<0.05), as well as individual acids content, primarily acetate and propionate. No differences (P<0.05) were detected in rumen pH and ammonia content. It appears that AOFC is more suitable for the purpose of meat production.   Key words: A. oryzae, sheep, digestibility, rumen, in vivo
Quality of Garut ram frozen semen in various glycerol concentrations Rizal, Muhammad; Toelihere, M.R; Yusuf, T.L; Purwantara, B; Situmorang, P
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 7, No 3 (2002): SEPTEMBER 2002
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (144.127 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i3.294

Abstract

Semen was collected once a week using artificial vagina from four mature Garut rams. Immediately after initial evaluation, semen was divided into three parts and diluted with tris extender containing 3% (G3), 5% (G5), and 7% (G7) glycerol, respectively, each with the concentration of 100 million motile sperm 0.25 ml-1. Semen was loaded in 0.25 ml mini straws, and equilibrated at 50C for three hours, then frozen and stored in liquid nitrogen container. Results indicated that percentages of post thawing motility and live sperm for G5 (40 and 50.50%) were significantly higher than G3 (32.50 and 45.33%) (P<0.05), but not significantly different with G7 (39.17 and 47.67%) (P>0.05). Percentages of post thawing intact acrosomal and plasma membrane for G5 (42.67 and 43.17%) were significantly higher than G3 (36.17 and 38.17%) (P<0.05), but not significantly different with G7 (38 and 39.83%) (P>0.05). In conclusion, concentration of 5% glycerol is the optimal dose in maintaining frozen semen quality of Garut rams.   Key words: Glycerol concentrations, frozen semen, Garut ram
Effect of tempe waste on excreation of purine derivatives and microbial–N supply in lactating Etawah crossbred goats Astuti, D.A; Wina, E
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 7, No 3 (2002): SEPTEMBER 2002
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (132.932 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i3.290

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate excretion of purine derivatives and microbial–N supply in lactating Etawah crossbred goats fed with fermented soybean waste. Sixteen first lactating goats were randomly allotted into four dietary treatment groups that received 50% king grass plus R1: 50% concentrate, R2: 25% concentrate and 25% fresh tempe waste, R3: 25% concentrate and 25% fermented tempe waste, and R4: 25% concentrate and 25% gelatinizing of liquid tempe waste. Fermented tempe waste was made by fermentation of tempe waste (seed content of soybean) using Aspergillus niger, while for the gellatinizing of liquid tempe waste was made by gelatinized with maize flour. Protein balance studies were conducted during two week trial and at the end of the research. Urinary protein and purine derivatives were collected for analysis. Microbial–N supply was calculated from purine derivatives excretion. Results showed that nitrogen consumptions were significantly different between R4 and three other treatments and apparent digestible nitrogen in R3 were higher than that of R4 (P<0.05). The nitrogen retention in R1 and R3 were higher than that of R2 and R4. Urinary purine derivatives in this study showed that allantoin, xanthine and hypoxanthine in R3 were higher than that of R4, while R1 and R2 were the same and the highest uric acid excretion and total purine derivatives were observed in R3. Microbial–N supply were significantly different between all treatments where R3 was the highest. This research concluded that fermented soybean waste had the highest total purine derivatives excretion and microbial–N supply to the lactating Etawah crossbred goats.   Key words: Etawah crossbred goats, Aspergillus niger, allantoin, xanthin and hypoxanthin
The responses of eosinophil and packed cell volume (PCV) on sheep infected with Fasciola gigantica Widjajanti, S; Estuningsih, S Endah; Partoutomo, Subandriyo; Raadsma, H.W; Spithill, T.W; Piedrafita, D
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 7, No 3 (2002): SEPTEMBER 2002
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (173.927 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i3.295

Abstract

The responses of eosinophil and packed cell volume (PCV) values were verified in infected sheep, in order to identify whether these parameters could be used to predict the flukes burden and their correlation with breed resistance. Fifteen Indonesian thin tail sheep (ET), 9 Merino sheep and 148 backcross sheep generated from mating of Merino sheep and F1 sheep (Merino X ET cross) were infected with 300 metacercariae of Fasciola gigantica. The blood samples were collected every 2 weeks by using EDTA venoject tubes in order to determine the amount of eosinophils and the PCV value. After 14 weeks of infection all of sheep were killed and the liver was collected in order to determine the number of flukes. The results showed that the amount of eosinophils increased 2 weeks after infection and reached the peak at week 4 after infection. The average of eosinophils in ET appeared higher than the other 2 breeds (Merino was the lowest and the backcross was in between). The correlation between the number of flukes recovered from the liver and the eosinophil counts were positive in ET and Merino, but negative in the backcross sheep. The PCV values remained constant along the trial, except at week 14 after infection; the PCV values were slightly decreased in backcross sheep and Merino sheep, but not in ET sheep. The correlation between number of flukes in the liver and the PCV values were negative in all breeds of sheep. These results suggested that the eosinophilic and PCV’s response of ET were higher compared to backcross and Merino sheep, thus that responses were thought to be associated with the resistant phenomenon.   Key words: Fasciolosis, eosinophil, PCV, sheep
Effect of Bacillus apiarius or Torulaspora delbrueckii on performance of broiler chicken Kompiang, I.P; Zaenuddin, D; ., Supriyati
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 7, No 3 (2002): SEPTEMBER 2002
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (145.005 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i3.286

Abstract

An experiment had been conducted to determine the effect of B. apiarius and T. delbrueckii, isolated from chicken gut, supplementation on the broiler performance. Evaluation was conducted by comparing performance of broiler chicken: (I) negative control/basal diet without antibiotic growth promotor (GPA), (II) positive control/basal diet with GPA, zinc-bacitracin, (III) basal diet + B. apiarius 5 ml/l in drinking water daily, (IV) basal diet + T. delbrueckii 5 ml/l in drinking water daily, (V) basal diet + B. apiarius 5 ml/l in drinking, daily during the first week, and there after given twice weekly, (VI) basal diet + T. delbrueckii 5 ml/l in drinking, daily during the first week, and there after given twice weekly and (VII) reference control, basal diet + commercial probiotic 5 ml/l in drinking, daily during the first week, and there after given twice weekly. Thirty two DOC broilers were used for each treatment, divided into 4 replicates (8 birds/replicate) and raised in wire cages for 5 weeks. Feed and water were given ad lib., body weight, FCR (feed conversion ratio) and mortality were recorded. The results showed that the performance of the birds supplemented daily (III) or twice weekly (V) with B. apiarius are similar to positive control (II) or reference control (VII) and significantly (P<0.05) better than the negative control (I). Performance of the birds supplemented daily with T. delbrueckii (IV) are similar to positive control (II) or reference control (VII) and significantly (P<0.05) better than the negative control (I). However, when given only twice weekly (VI), their bodyweight gain was significantly (P<0.05) lower than treatment II, III, IV and VII, but similar to treatment I. Its FCR value was similar to the other treatments. Mortality was low, an average of 1.3/32 birds, during the trial period and there were no differences between all treatments. It is concluded that both B. apiarius and T. delbrueckii could be utilized as probiotic candidates, replacing the GPA function. However, B. apiarius is better potential as probiotic candidate compare to T. delbrueckii. Key words: Bacillus apiarius, Torulaspora delbrueckii, probiotic, GPA, broiler
Strategic study on energy-protein requirements for local sheep: 4. Ewes during late pregnancy Mathius, I-W; Sastradipradja, D; Sutardi, T; Natasasmita, A; Sofyan, L.A; Sihombing, D.T.H
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 7, No 3 (2002): SEPTEMBER 2002
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (212.288 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i3.291

Abstract

Thirty-six Javanese thin-tail ewes were set out to study the energy and crude protein requirements for the last eight-week of pregnancy. The ewes were randomlly assigned to a 3 x 3 factorial arrangement and offered nine diets comprising three levels of energy (low, medium and high) and three levels of crude protein (low, medium and high) with four ewes per treatment. The diets were pelleted and offered four times daily at approximately in the same amount. Results showed that, despite a difference of energy concentration in the diets, dry matter intake was not significantly (P>0.05) affected, but crude protein concentration was (P<0.05). Energy concentration in the diet also had no effect (P>0.05) on protein intake. However, protein concentration in the diets significantly affected on protein intake and protein excreted in the feces. Moreover, an interaction between energy and protein levels was not detected on energy and nitrogen availability utilization. This study demonstrated that a high efficiency on nitrogen utilization could be achieved on low crude protein diets. It was also found that crude protein and energy requirements for maintanance during pregnancy phase were 0.67 g/kg BW0.75 and 0.425 MJ EM/kg BW0.75 respectively.   Key words: Protein-energy requirement, pregnancy phase, ewes  
Effect of feeding methods of katuk (Sauropus androgynus) extract on performance and carcass quality of broiler chickens Santoso, U; Suteky, T; ., Heryanto; ., Sunarti
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 7, No 3 (2002): SEPTEMBER 2002
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (156.187 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i3.287

Abstract

The present experiment was conducted to evaluate effect of feeding methods of katuk extract on performance and carcass quality of broilers. Sixty 20-d-old male broilers were distributed to 5 treatment groups of 4 replicates with 3 birds each. One treatment group was fed basal diet without katuk extract (P0), whereas other treatment groups were fed basal diet plus 18 g katuk extract/kg diet (P1), basal diet plus 9 g katuk extract/l drinking water (P2), basal diet plus 9 g katuk extract/kg diet plus 4.5 g katuk extract/l drinking water (P3), and basal diet plus 4.5 g katuk extract/kg diet plus 2.25 g katuk extract/l drinking water (P4). Experimental results showed that weight gain of P1 and P4 were significantly higher (P<0.05) than those of P0 and P2. Feed conversion ratio of P1 and P4 were significantly lower than those of P0 and P2 (P<0.05). Feed intake, water intake, the weights of heart, liver and gizzard were not significantly different (P>0.05), but the weight of intestine was significantly affected (P<0.05) Abdominal fat of P4 was significantly lower than that of P0, P1 and P2 (P<0.05). Carcass color of P4 was significantly better than that of P0, P1, P2 and P3 (P<0.01). Katuk extract feeding had no effect on smell and taste of meat (P>0.05). P4 had better meat color than P0, P1, dan P2 (P<0.05). Katuk extract feeding had no effect on meat bone ratio, carcaas weight and cooking loss (P>0.05). In conclusion, in order to improve performance and carcass quality, broiler chickens could be given katuk extract through diet plus drinking water at level of 4.5 g/kg diet plus 2.25 g/l drinking water.   Key words: Katuk extract, performance, carcass quality, abdominal fat
The effects of inclusion of exogenous phospholipid in Tris diluent with different level of egg yolk on the viability of bull spermatozoa Situmorang, P
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 7, No 3 (2002): SEPTEMBER 2002
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (143.892 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i3.292

Abstract

This study has been conducted to evaluate the effect of inclusion of phospholipid in Tris-diluent containing different level of egg yolk on the viability of bull spermatozoa after chilling and freezing. Semen was collected by means of artificial vagina, diluted in Tris-diluent to get a final concentration 100 x 106 spermatozoa/ml. Diluted semen was cooled to 50C for 45-60 minute, equiliberated in those temperature for 4 hours and frozen by placing the straw 5 cm above surface of liquid nitrogen for 10 minutes. The experiments was factorial designed with two level of phospholipid (0 and 0.5 mm) and 4 concentration of egg yolk (0, 5, 10 and 20% v/v). The viability of spermatozoa was assessed by evaluating the percentage of motile, live and condition of apical ridge after the temperature reduced to 50C, stored at those temperature for 3 and 7 days and after thawing. Inclusion of phospholipid and level of egg yolk in Tris diluent significantly increased the viability of spermatozoa for both chilling and deepfreezing. The mean percentage of motile, live and intact apical ridge for 3 and 7 days of storage times at 50C, were significantly higher (P<0.05) in diluent containing phospholipid than without phospholipid. After thawing, the mean percentage motile, live and intact apical ridges were significantly higher (P<0.05) in a diluent containing phospholipid (49.9; 60.2 and 60.0) than those without phospholipid (39.1; 54.1 and 51.5). The effects of interaction between phospholipid and level of egg yolk on the viability of spermatozoa was not significant for both chilling and freezing. Level of egg yolk significantly (P<0.05) affected the viability of spermatozoa where the optimal level of egg yolk was 10% v/v for chilled semen and the higher level (20% v/v) was needed for frozen semen. In conclusion, Tris diluent containing 0,5 mM phosphatidyl coline with 10 or 20% egg yolk gave a best protection for chilled and frozen semen respectively.   Key words: Spermatozoa, viability, phospholipid, egg yolk
The chemical changing during fermentation of cassava tuber skin and its utilization in broiler chicken ration ., Supriyati; Kompiang, I.P
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 7, No 3 (2002): SEPTEMBER 2002
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (119.266 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i3.288

Abstract

Cassava tuber skin is a by-product of cassava chip industry, solid state fermented using mixed inorganic nitrogen and Aspergillus niger. The fermentation process was carried out for 3-4 days. The chemical changing during fermentation of cassava tuber skin and its utilization in broiler chicken ration were studied. After fermentation showed that the crude protein, crude protein digestibility, crude fat, ash, Ca, Ca digestibility, P, and P digestibility improved. The contents of crude protein and its digestibility improved from 4.80% and 66.90% to 28.00% and 72.00%, respectively. The crude fat content improved from 1.32% to 1.80%. The ash content improved from 7.80% to 9.20%, this was followed by improving of Ca and P from 0.97% and 0.11% to 1.69% and 0.68%, respectively. Also the Ca and P digestibilities improved from 81.10% and 14.10% to 93.20% and 52.00%, respectively. The crude fiber content decreased from 21,20% to 14,96 %, cianide acid (HCN) and urea contents also decreased. The result of feeding trial showed that the inclusion of fermented cassava tuber skin up to 10% in chicken broiler ration for 4 weeks feeding showed that the feed consumption, bodyweight gain and FCR were not different significantly (P>0.05). However, 15% inclusion reduced bodyweight gain and increased significantly FCR (P<0.05). It could be concluded that the nutrient content of cassava tuber skin improved after fermentation and the fermentation product could be used up 10% in broiler ration.   Key words: Nutrient composition, cassava tuber skin, fermentation, broiler ration
Effect of Collection Technique on Yield of Bovine Oocytes and the Development Potential of Oocytes from Different Grades of Oocytes Sianturi, R.G; Thein, M; Wahid, H; Rosnina, Yono C
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 7, No 3 (2002): SEPTEMBER 2002
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (151.949 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i3.293

Abstract

Oocyte collection technique is important to obtain a maximum number of oocytes to be employed on in vitro production of embryos. In this study, immature bovine oocytes were collected from slaughterhouse ovaries by two techniques: aspiration of 2- to 6-mm follicles and slicing. Following collection, oocyte qualities were classified into four categories (A, B, C, and D) on the basis of cumulus attachment. Oocytes of each category were matured in vitro in CO2 incubator for 22-24 hours and cumulus expansion and maturation rates were observed. The total number of oocytes (group A+B+C+D) and yield of good quality oocytes (only group A and B) recovered per ovary by aspiration were 12.02 and 8.21, and by slicing were 29.38 and 19.65 (P<0.01), respectively. The total cumulus cells expansion rates of A, B, C and D oocytes were 97.1%, 88.3%, 6.0% and 20.6% respectively. Maturation rates for A, B and C categories of oocytes were 91.4%, 82.3% and 35.0% respectively while no matured oocyte was observed for group D oocytes. Maturation rates were significantly different between group A and C and also between B and C but not between A and B (P<0.05). In conclusion, slicing technique recovered more oocytes per ovary (2.4 times) than that of aspiration and the best maturation rate was observed from category A oocytes which surrounded by more than 3 layers of cumulus cells. However oocytes of category A and B can be considered as good quality oocytes.   Key words: Collection technique, aspiration, slicing, oocyte quality, maturation

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