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Ahmadi Riyanto
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medpub@litbang.deptan.go.id
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ahmadi_puslitbangnak@yahoo.com
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Kota bogor,
Jawa barat
INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
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Articles 9 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 7, No 2 (2002): JUNE 2002" : 9 Documents clear
Effectiveness of Aspergillus oryzae fermentation culture to improve digestion of fibrous feeds Lubis, Darwinsyah; Wina, E; Haryanto, B; Suhargiantatmo, T
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 7, No 2 (2002): JUNE 2002
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (199.957 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i2.280

Abstract

Studies regarding the use of living microorganisms as supplement have been done in the last two decades to improve digestion process in the rumen. Many factors affect the use of the supplement, such as ration composition and physiological status of the animals. Materials used in this experiment are Aspergillus oryzae (AO) derived from ‘tauco’ (salty fermented soybean) and soybean sauce processing factories located in Bogor, Cianjur, and Sukabumi districts (15 sources), and also AO culture collections of the Indonesian Res. Inst. for Anim. Prod. (2 strains) and one strain from Indonesian Res. Inst. for Vet. Sci. in Bogor. The fungus was first isolated in potato dextrose agar (PDA), incubated at room temp. (26-300C) for 5 days for purification. The AO from PDA then inoculated into cooked rice enriched with mineral mix, oven-dried (40-450C), then ground and kept in refrigerator as a stock culture for further use. To produce more AO (scaling-up), the culture is inoculated in two basal media, i.e. soybean meal and ‘onggok’ (tapioca processing waste) enriched with mineral mix, dried and ground, then kept in refrigerator as A. oryzae fermentation culture (AOFC). Ground-dried King grass was used for in vitro digestion trials using sheep rumen fluid, which was not supplemented (control) or supplemented with the AOFC (10% w/w) from various sources. Three best AOFC (by origin) were chosen and used for further digestion study. The study was run using 2 (media) x 3 (AOFC origin) factorial experiment based on a completely randomized design and Duncan’s MRT was applied to test differences among treatment means. Preliminary results indicated of the AOFC-SP66, -F172, and -CT4 used, the best AOFC was SP66, as it increased (P<0.05) fiber (NDF) digestion (10.5% better than the control). Total VFA productions were similar, but acetate content in the rumen fluid was lowered (P<0.05), while propionate and butyrate levels were alleviated (P<0.05) by the AOFC-SP66. Ammonia content was not affected by addition of AOFC. No differences were detected on digestion parameters between the two media used for AO cultivation, therefore, it is suggested to use ‘onggok’ for producing AOFC in large scale. VFAs composition pattern suggests that AOFC was more suitably used for meat rather than for milk production. Key words: Fungus, King grass, digestibility, rumen fluid
The development of an Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay for detecting Injectious laryngotrachitis viral antibodies in chicken serum Indriani, Risa; Adjid, R.M Abdul; ., Darminto; Hamid, Helmy
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 7, No 2 (2002): JUNE 2002
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (178.993 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i2.285

Abstract

The aim of this study was to develop an Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of antibody against gallid herpes virus, the causal agent of infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) in chicken. Its application in experimental chicken under laboratory condition was also evaluated. Results showed that ELISA for ILT was developed successfully with sensitivity and specificity was 98% and 97,14% respectively. The ELISA was able to determine the dynamic of antibodies respond in experimental chickens following vaccination and artificial infection with ILT virus. It was concluded that this ELISA offers a simple, sensitive and specific antibody assay for detection of antibodies against ILT virus in chickens arising from vaccination or infection.   Key words: ELISA, antibody, chicken, Infectious laryngotrachitis
Dietary energy and crude protein requirements of Ettawah Cross Kids: 1. Intake, digestibility, availability and utilization of nutrients Mathius, I-W; Gaga, I.B; Sutama, I-K
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 7, No 2 (2002): JUNE 2002
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (198.735 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i2.281

Abstract

An experiment was designed in order to study the crude protein and energy requirement of Ettawah Cross growing goats. Twenty seven kids (average body weight of 11.80 + 1.4 kg) were used and randomly allotted to a 3 x 3 factorial arrangement of treatments, consisting of three different levels of crude protein and three levels of energy. Results from this experiment showed that animal performance was effected by dietary treatments. Increasing levels of energy ration significantly (P<0.05) decreased the dry matter intake, with overall mean values were 3.0; 2.8 and 2.5% of body weight for low, medium and high levels of energy respectively. Dietary treatments increased energy (EM) and crude protein intake, and overall values were 0.2046 + 0.016 Mkal/kg BW0.75 and 8.20 + 2.473 g/kg BW0.75 repectively. Positive response on animal performance was also effected by dietary treatment, with overall mean value of 86.40 + 29.59 g head-1day-1. The highest response on animal performance (ADG 123.3 g) was found on kids fed diet containing combination of low level of energy and high level of crude protein. Meanwhile, the lowest average daily gain (45 g) was resulted by kids fed ration containing combination of high level of energy and low level of crude protein.   Key words: Protein-energy, etawah cross kids, growing fase
Responses of broilers to Aloe vera bioactives as feed additive: The effect of different forms and levels of bioactives on performances of broilers Sinurat, A.P; Purwadaria, T; Togatorop, M.H; Pasaribu, T; Bintang, I.A.K; Sitompul, S; Rosida, J
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 7, No 2 (2002): JUNE 2002
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (137.366 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i2.277

Abstract

Feed additives are commonly used in poultry feed as growth promotors or to improve feed efficiency. Previous results showed that Aloe vera bioactives could improve feed efficiency in broilers. Therefore, a further study was designed in order to obtain optimum doses and application methods of bioactives for broiler chickens. Aloe vera was prepared in different forms (fresh gel, dry gel, fresh whole leaf or dry whole leaf). The aloe was supplemented into the feed with concentrations of 0.25; 0.5 and 1 g/kg (equal to dry gel). Standard diets with or without antibiotics were also included as control. The diets were fed to broilers from day old to 5 weeks and the performances were observed. Results showed that the aloe-bioactives did not significantly (P>0.05) affect final body weight of broilers as compared with the control. Supplementation of 0.25 g/kg fresh gel, 0.25 and 1.0 g/kg dry gel significantly improved feed convertion by 4.7; 4.8 and 8.2%, respectively as compared with the control. This improvement was a result of reduction in feed intake or dry matter intake without reducing the weight gain. However, supplementation of whole aloe leafs could not improve feed convertion in boilers. It is concluded that the bioactives of Aloe vera could be used as feed supplement to improve feed efficiency in broilers with no deleterious effect on weight gain, carcass yield, abdominal fat levels and internal organs. The effective concentrations of aloe gell as a feed supplement based on dry matter convertion were from 0.25 g/kg fresh gel, 0.25 and 1.0 g/kg dry gel.   Key words: Broilers, feed efficiency, feed additives, Aloe vera
Oestrous synchronization using composite solution of testosterone, oestradiol and progesterone on Peranakan Etawah goat Sutama, I-Ketut; Dharsana, R; Budiarsana, I-G.M; Kostaman, T
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 7, No 2 (2002): JUNE 2002
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (162.719 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i2.282

Abstract

Progestagen is generally used for hormonal treatment in the synchronization program, but the cost of this stuffs is relatively expensive. An alternatif low cost agent for sinchronization is needed and this is a focus of the present study. Forty eight heads of mature does and 4 bucks of Peranakan Etawah (PE) goats was used in two phases of study. In the first phase, three types of composite compounds (TOP-A, TOP-B and TOP-C) were tested on a number of PE does. In the second phase of the study, the best TOP composite of the first phase was compared with Fluogestone Acetate (FGA) which is a commercially made of progestagen for synchronization. FGA was inserted intravaginal for 7 days (FGA-7) and 14 days (FGA-14). Results of the study in phase I showed that only 40-60% of does showed oestrus following TOP composite treatment, and 50-67% of them in groups TOP-A and TOP-B did not ovulate, while all oestrous does in TOP-C group ovulated. Oestrous cycle length was within a normal range of oestrous cycle (15 - 22 days) indicating that TOP composite did not have negative effect on reproductive activity of goats. The best TOP-C in the study phase I was tested in the study phase II and compared with FGA. The results showed that the number of does in oestrus in TOP-C group was only 63.6% which was much lower than those of FGA-7 (81.8%) and FGA-14 (100% ). Imperiority of TOP-C and FGA-7 were shown by a relatively high incident of oestrus without ovulation which were 14.3% and 11.1% for the respective groups. Consequently, ovulation rates in both groups were lower than those of FGA-14 (1.1 vs 1.4 vs 1.8, P<0.05). Pregnancy rate in TOP-C was also the lowest (27.3%) compared with those of group FGA-7 (63.6%) and group FGA-14 (81.8%). Based on the results obtained, it could be concluded that TOP composite used in this study was not as good as FGA in inducing oestrus in goat.   Key words: Oestrous synchronization, progestagen, Peranakan Etawah goat
Effect of restricted feeding on productivity of Mojosari x Alabio cross-bred layer ducks (MA): 2. Second phase of laying from 44-67 weeks old Ketaren, P.P; Prasetyo, L.H
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 7, No 2 (2002): JUNE 2002
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (163.359 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i2.278

Abstract

Productivity and feed efficiency of Mojosari Alabio (MA) cross-bred duck on the first phase of laying from 20-43 weeks old was better when fed ad lib. using pelleted diet. An experiment was conducted to evaluate effect of restricted feeding of pelleted diet on second phase of laying of MA cross-bred duck performances from 44-67 weeks old. The experiment was designed in a Completely Randomized Design. 156 MA cross-bred ducks were devided into three groups and fed three experimental diets: (1) 70% ad lib., (2) 85% ad lib. and (3) ad lib. All experimental diets were fed to ducks for 24 weeks and feed intake, egg production, egg weight, FCR, molting, egg yolk weight, albumen weight, egg shell weight and egg yolk colour score were measured as parameters. The results showed that the restricted feeding of 70 and 85% significantly (P<0.05) reduced egg production, egg weight and egg yolk percentage, egg yolk colour score and induced early molting, but did not adversely affect egg white and egg shell percentage. FCR of duck fed 70% (6.47) was significantly (P<0.05) the worst compared to the duck fed 85% (4.13) and ad lib. (3.55). The results indicate that MA cross-bred duck was more efficient being fed ad lib. Key words: Restricted feeding, MA crossbred duck, productivity and egg quality
Effect of exogenous glutathione in medium fertilization to improve blastocyst rates of bovine embryos Triwulaninngsih, E; Situmorang, P; Putu, I-G; Sugiarti, T; Lubis, A.M; Kusumaningrum, D.A; Caroline, W; Sianturi, R.G
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 7, No 2 (2002): JUNE 2002
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (190.218 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i2.283

Abstract

Glutathione (C10H17N3O6S) is a tripeptide (γ-Glu-Cys-Gly) widespread in living organism. Glutathione (GSH) at the 5 mM concentration increased the motility and fertility of frozen-thawed sperm. Intracellulair glutathione improved the cleavage rate and embryo development to the blastocyst rate. Research on in vitro embryos production through the implementation of GSH during IVF (in vitro fertilization) on embryo development has been conducted at the Laboratorium Reproductive of Physiology, Research Institute for Animal Production. Ovaries of beef cattle as source of oocytes were collected from the slaughterhouse in a thermo flask with 350C PBS as medium and transported to the laboratory. The oocytes were fertilized in vitro with selected motile sperm using Percoll gradient (90 and 45%). Ten COCs (cumulus oocytes complexes) were transfered to 44 μl of fertilization medium (mTALP) was performed with either 0; 0.25; 0.50; 0.75 and 1.00 mM of glutathione as treatment A, B, C, D and E respectively, and inseminated with 2 μl of capacitated sperm and added 2 μl of heparin and 2 μl of PHE (consisting of 20 μM penicillamine, 10 μM hypotaurine, 1 μM epinephrine). Incubation between sperm and oocytes in the 5% CO2 incubator and RH 90% in fertilization media (TALP) for 20 hours. All zygotes were cultured in modification of CR1aa medium up to blastocyst and were fed serum 5 μl/50μl medium on day 6. Results of this experiment showed that the effect of concentration of glutathione (0, 0.25; 0.50; 0.75 and 1.00 mM) on fertilization medium to the percentage of cleavage rates were 69.35 + 29.40; 79.07 + 13.17; 67.88 + 10.65; 98.10 + 3.30 and 82.62 + 24.19% not significant different (P>0.05) among treatments A, B, C, D dan E respectively.The precentages of morula and blastocyst for treatment D were 50.45 + 42.64% and 31.28 + 24.28%; while 36.55 + 24.13% and 17.74 + 17.86% for treatment E respectively.   Key words: Glutathione, in vitro fertilization, oocytes, cleavage
Effects of house type and early feed restriction on performance and fat deposition in unsexed broilers Santoso, U
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 7, No 2 (2002): JUNE 2002
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (143.467 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i2.279

Abstract

The present experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of house type and early feed restriction on performance and fat deposition of unsexed broilers. Four hundreds seven-day old unsexed broilers (Arbor Acres CP 707) were distributed into eight treatment groups. Each treatment group was represented by five replicates of ten broilers each. Two types of house (cage vs litter) and four levels of feeding (ad lib., 75% ad lib., 50% ad lib. and 25% ad lib.) were tested as treatment factors. Broilers were feed-restricted for 6 days from 7 to 13 days of age and thereafter they were fed ad lib. Feed intake of restricted broilers during restriction period was calculated from feed consumed by ad lib. group in the previous day. Results showed that unsexed broilers raised in litter had higher body weight (P<0.05), lower abdominal fat and higher triglyceride concentration at 42 days of age (P<0.05), and lower liver fat and higher carcass percentage at 56 days of age (P<0.05). Early feed restriction reduced body weight of 42-day old unsexed broilers except for broilers fed 75% ad lib. At 56 days of age, restricted broilers had similar body weight to those fed ad lib. At 56 days of age, broilers fed 25% ad lib. had lower FCR (P<0.05), lower abdominal fat (P<0.05) and lower triglyceride concentration (P<0,05). In conclusion, unsexed broilers fed 25% ad lib. showed compensatory growth with better FCR and lower fat accumulation at 56 days of age. Broilers raised in litter had higher body weight and lower abdominal and liver fat deposition.   Key words: House type, early feed restriction, fat deposition, unsexed broilers
In vitro studies: The role of immunological cells in Indonesian thin tail sheep in the killing of the liver fluke, Fasciola Estuningsih, S.E; Wiidjajanti, S; Partoutomo, S; ., Spithill; Raadsma, H; Piedrafita, D
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 7, No 2 (2002): JUNE 2002
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (155.304 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i2.284

Abstract

Previous studies have shown that Indonesian Thin Tail (ET) sheep exhibit high resistance to challenge with Fasciola gigantica when compared with Merino sheep, and this resistance is expressed in early infection. In order to study the role of the immune system in this resistance to ET sheep, in vitro studies were undertaken in the laboratory. In vitro study to confirm the ability of immune cells from ET sheep in the killing of F. gigantica larvae has been done by incubating immune cells and F. gigantica larvae together with immune sera or normal sera. The viability of the larvae was observed over a period 3 days incubation by observing their motility. The results showed that the cells isolated from F. gigantica- challenged ET sheep in the presence of immune sera from ET were able to kill 70% of the larvae. In contrast, cells from infected Merino were unable to kill a significant number of F. gigantica using the same sera source. It seems that the cytotoxicity was dependent on the presence of immune sera and ET peritoneal cells, suggesting the potential role of an antibody-dependent cell cytotoxic (ADCC) mechanism in the resistant ET sheep. Key words: In vitro, Fasciola gigantica, peritoneal cell, sheep gigantica.

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