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Ahmadi Riyanto
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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 9 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 7, No 1 (2002): MARCH 2002" : 9 Documents clear
Effect of Yeast : Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Marine Yeast as probiotic supplement on performance of poultry Kompiang, I Putu
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 7, No 1 (2002): MARCH 2002
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (137.058 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i1.270

Abstract

An experiment had been conducted to evaluate the effect of marine yeast and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc) as probiotic supplement on poultry performance. Marine yeast isolated from rotten sea-weed and commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae were used. Evaluation was conducted by comparing performance of broiler chicken supplemented with marine yeast or Sc, which were given through drinking water (5 ml/l) to negative control (feed without antibiotic growth promotor/GPA), positive control (feed with GPA), and reference commercial probiotic. Forty DOC broiler birds were used for each treatment, divided into 4 replicates (10 birds/replicate) and raised in wire cages for 5 weeks. Body weight and feed consumption were measured weekly and mortality was recorded during the trial. The results showed that there were no significant difference on the birds performance among marine yeast, Sc, positive control and probiotic reference control treatments. However their effects on bird performance were better (P<0.05) than treatment of negative control. It is concluded that marine yeast or Saccharomyces cerevisiae could replace the function of antibiotic as a growth promotant.   Key words : Marine yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, probiotic, GPA, poultry
The effect of dietary crude protein substitution as protected soybean meal on pregnant and lactating ewes’ performance Mathius, I-W; Yulistiani, D; Puastuti, W
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 7, No 1 (2002): MARCH 2002
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (176.934 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i1.271

Abstract

Production respons was related to rumen undegradable protein feeding. Twenty-six local late pregnant ewes are penned individually and allocated to four dietary treatment groups of feed supplement, containing different amount of protected soybean meal and provided 0% (R1), 10% (R2) 20% (R3) and 40% (R4) crude protein of feed supplement respectively. Diets were fed until the first 8-week of lactation phase. Results showed that the mean of total dry matter intake (DMI) during late pregnancy was 3,42% of body weight (BW). Dietary treatments of protected-protein tended to increase daily mean intake of dry matter (P>0.05), ie. 76.9; 77.25; 77.49 and 78.81 g/kg BW 0.75 for R0, R1, R2 and R3 respectively. A similar trend was noted in daily intake of crude protein with the mean of 9.75; 10.31; 10,75 and 12.1 g/kg BW0.75 (for R0, R1, R2 and R3 respectively) and were not different significantly (P>0.05) among dietary treatments. Increasing the amount of protected-protein in the ration influenced (P<0.05) the daily live weight gain (ADG) of ewes during the late phase of gestation which was 104.4, 99.4, 120.8 and 148.14 for R0, R1, R2 and R3 respectively. Feed efficiency (DMI/ADG) improved as substitution of protected-protein increased. The total birth weight of lambs (g/ewe) was not significantly different (P>0.05), by increasing level of protected-protein in the ration, averaging 3.2 kg/ewe. Increasing protected-protein, increased (P<0.05) the daily gain (g/ewe) of lambs during the first 8-week of lactation, and it was 127, 131, 165 and 211 g/ewe/d for R0, R1, R2 and R3 respectively. Consequently, the weaned weight at 8- week of ages increased significantly different (P<0.05) as the amount of protected-protein in the diet increased.   Key words: Banana latex, protected-protein, ewes production
Infection of Parainfluenza type 3 (PI-3) as one of the causative agent of pneumonia in sheep and goats Sendow, Indrawati; Syafriati, Tatty; Wiedosari, Ening; Selleck, Paul
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 7, No 1 (2002): MARCH 2002
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (403.275 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i1.276

Abstract

Serological survey was conducted to obtain the prevalence of Parainfluenza type 3 (PI-3) reactor as one of the causative agent of pneumonia in sheep and goats in abatoir at Jakarta and some small holder farms in Indonesia. Serological test using serum neutralization from 724 goat sera and 109 sheep sera indicated that only 1% of goats were serologically reactors and none of sheep sera had antibodies against PI-3 virus. Isolation of the virus from 56 bronchus and trachea swab and 345 lungs indicated that only one sampel from lung showed cythopathic effect (CPE) in Madin Darby Bovine Kidney (MDBK) cell lines identification of the virus using serum neutralization test indicated that the virus neutralized reference PI-3 antisera. The isolate came from one lung (7%) of 24 that showed histopathologically pneumonia intertitialis that usually caused by viral infection. Key words: Parainfluenza type 3 (PI-3), virus isolation, sheep, goat, pneumonia intertisialis
Using CR1aa versus KSOM as the culture medium for in vitro embryo production of cattle Triwulaninngsih, Endang; Toelihere, M.R; Rutledge, J.J; Yusuf, T.L; Purwantara, B; Diwyanto, K
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 7, No 1 (2002): MARCH 2002
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (237.936 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i1.272

Abstract

This research has been conducted at the laboratory of in vitro fertilization in the Department of Animal Science University of Wisconsin, USA. These embryos can be used for improving genetic value of Indonesian cattle. Oocytes were matured in TCM- 199 medium (in 5% CO2 incubator and at 390C) enriched with follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) 10 μl/ml, oestradiol 17 β 1μl/ml and 10% Fetal Calf Serum (FCS). The oocytes were fertilized in vitro with motile sperm and incubation between sperm and oocytes in fertilization medium Tyroide Albumin Lactate Pyruvate (TALP) for 20 hours. All zygotes were cultured in CR1aa (n=1549) medium versus modification of protein-free pottasium simplex optimized medium (KSOM) (n=675) up to blastocyst stage and were fed FCS 5 μl/50 μl medium on day 6, as treatment A and B respectively. Data were analyzed by completely randomized design with SAS program. Percentages of cleavage, morula, blastocyst, expanded blastocyst, unfertilized and degenerated ova in this study were 91.4% vs 75.6 %; 75.6% vs 58.9%; 61.5% vs 38.5%; 31.2% vs 5.1%, 8.6% vs 24.4%, 15.7% vs 8% which were significantly different (P<0.01) for treatment CR1aa and KSOM respectively. Based on this study, CR1aa medium is better culture medium than KSOM for efficient in vitro production (IVP) of bovine embryos.   Key words: Oocytes, in vitro fertilization, embryo, blastocyst, culture medium
Metabolism in compensatory growth: VI. Effect of energy yielding substrates Mahyudi, Prapti
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 7, No 1 (2002): MARCH 2002
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (188.826 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i1.268

Abstract

An experiment was designed to investigate the effect of different rates of glucose infusion into animals fed a maintenance diet supplemented with undegraded protein (HCHO-casein). Twelve Merino wether Iambs were divided into 3 treatment groups receiving different rates of glucose infusion, 10 mmolelh, 20 mmolelh and 30 mmolelh. The intake and digestibility of dry matter were not affected by glucose infusion. The infusion of glucose increased N retention by reducing both faecal and urinary N. It was estimated that per unit of glucose infused, animal retained 0.15 g N/mmole glucoselh. The efficiency of N retention were 28%, 35% and 44% for glucose infusion rate of 10 mmolelh, 20 mmolelh and 30 mmolelh respectively. Urea entry rate decreased as glucose infusion rate increased. The estimation of protein spared by glucose infusion calculated from N retention and urinary excretion rate gave a value of 20 g and 25 g per 100 g glucose infused respectively. The proportion of glucose entry rate (GER) that could potentially derived from amino acids reduced as the rate of glucose infusion increased, being 21%, 17% and 14% for 10 mmolelh, 20 mmolelh and 30 mmolelh of glucose infused respectively. The GER, percentage of glucose oxidized and its contribution to CO2 production increased as the rate of glucose infusion increased. However, CO2 entry rate was not significantly affected by rates of glucose infusion. Glucose uptake by the hind-limb muscles increased with increasing rates of glucose infusion and strongly related with both GER and plasma insulin concentration. There was a tendency for circulating essential amino acids to reduce as the rate of glucose infusion increased, and was more prominent for branched chain amino acids (BCAA) at 30 mmolelh of glucose infusion. The reduction of amino acids in the blood circulation occurred concurrently with the reduction in plasma urea concentration and urea entry rate indicated increased net incorporation of amino acids into protein.   Key words: Compensatory growth, glucose, N retention, amin acid
Effect of restrticted feeding on productivity of Mojosari x Alabio cross-bred layer ducks (MA): 1. First phase of laying 20-43 weeks old Ketaren, Pius P; Prasetyo, L.H
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 7, No 1 (2002): MARCH 2002
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (157.596 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i1.273

Abstract

Feed cost is the major cost for duck-egg production which accounted to be more than 70% of total production cost. Feed efficiency of duck-egg production in Indonesia is low. The main reasons for the low feed efficiency (high feed conversion ratio, FCR) are (1) genetic trait (2) high feed wastage and (3) inadequate nutrient content of diet. An experiment was conducted to evaluate effect of restricted feeding of pelleted diet on Mojosari x Alabio (MA) cross-bred duck performances from 20-43 weeks old. The experiment was designed in a Completely Randomized Design. 156 MA cross-bred ducks were devided into three groups and fed three experimental diets: (1) 70%, 85%. and ad libitum. All experimental diets were fed to ducks for 24 weeks and feed intake, egg production, egg weight, FCR, molting and egg quality: egg yolk weight, albumen wight, egg shell weight and egg yolk colour score were measured as parameters. The results showed that the restricted feeding of 70% and 85% significantly (P<0.05) reduced egg production, egg weight and induced early molting but did not adversely affect duck livability and egg quality. MA croos-bred duck was more efficient by feeding ad libitum than the restricted feeding. FCR of duck fed 70% (6.38) was significantly (P<0.05) worst compared to FCR of duck fed 85% (3.68) and ad libitum (2.88).   Key words: Restricted feeding, MA crossbred duck, productivity and egg quality
Improvement of frozen semen quality of Garut Sheep through the addition of α-tocopherol into yolk egg-skim milk diluent ., Herdis; ., Kusuma; Surachman, M; Sutama, I.K; Riza, M; Inounu, I; Purwantara, B; Arifiantini, I
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 7, No 1 (2002): MARCH 2002
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (147.408 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i1.269

Abstract

The sperm is very fragile to lipid peroxide reaction, that it can easily broken during the process of freezing. To eliminate this consequences an antioxidant agent added into the extender. A research was done to observe the effect of antioxidant agent α-tocoferrol and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) presence in the extender on the quality of frozen semen. Once week, semen from six male Garut sheep ages about 2.5 years old was collected using artificial vagina and egg yolk skim-milk diluent used as the extender. The semen were treated in egg yolk skim-milk diluent without antioxidant as control, in egg yolk skim-milk diluent with α- tocoferrol 0,2 g/100 ml diluent and in egg yolk skim-milk diluent with butylated hydroxytoluene 0,2 g/100 ml diluent. The after thawing observation shown that in egg yolk skim-milk diluent with α- tocoferrol had life percentage (75.0 ± 3.5% vs 64.8 ± 7.8%) and membrane intact percentage (65.8 ± 6.8 % vs 55.2 ± 8.3%) significantly higher than control (P<0,05) but insignificantly different from with BHT addition. The presence of α-tocoferrol in the diluent, the motility percentage consideraly higher (P<0.05) than (45.8 ± 3.8%) using BHT addition (40.0 ± 4.5%) but not different from control (41.7 ± 4.1%); while acrosomal intake percentage after α-tocoferrol (54.8% ± 3.3%) expressively higher (p,0.05) than BHT addition (49.7 ± 3.6%) or control (49.8 ± 3.5%). In conclusion the presence of α-tocoferrol in the diluent could improve the quality of Garut sheep frozen semen.   Key words: Antioxidant, sperm, Garut sheep
The use of blood protein polymorphism to estimate genetic distance among populations of Indonesian native sheep, St. Croix and Merino Suparyanto, Agus; Purwadaria, T; ., Subandriyo; Haryati, T; Diwyanto, K
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 7, No 1 (2002): MARCH 2002
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (174.982 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i1.274

Abstract

The genetic distance among populations of Indonesia native sheep (Ciamis, Garut, Sumatera and Garahan), St. Croix and Merino were estimated to investigate the genetic relationship among those breeds. Blood protein polymorphism of transferin (Tf), post-transferin (PTf), albumin (Alb), post-albumin (PAlb) were detected from blood plasma, while haemoglobine (Hb) was detected from erythrocyte using Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis (PAGE). Results of PAGE showed that Tf was controlled by 6 alleles, while Alb by 4 alleles, PTf by 3 Alleles and PAlb and Hb by 2 alleles. Value of breeding coefficient within individual subpopulations (FIS) for Tf (-0,0014), Alb (-0,0046) and Hb (0,0256) were not significantly different by noel. These results show that data of gene frequency are still following Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium and inbreeding inside the sub population did not occur. The closest distance among the native breeds is the subpopulations of Ciamis and Garut due to neighboring area and similar traits of Thin Tail Sheep. The genetic distance of both population to Sumatera Thin Tail Sheep and Garahan Fat Tail are quite far. In addition to that results all Indonesian native breed were distinctly different from St. Croix and Merino.   Key words: Indonesian native sheep, St. Croix, Merino, blood protein polymorphism, genetic distance  
Protection of a live Pasteurella multocida B:3,4 vaccine against haemorrhagic septicaemia in cattle Priadi, Adin; Natalia, Lily
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 7, No 1 (2002): MARCH 2002
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (214.54 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i1.275

Abstract

Cross protection conferred by a live Pasteurella multocida B:3,4 vaccine to infection by P. multocida B:2, the haemorrhagis septicaemia causing bacteria in cattle was investigated. Intranasal aerogenic immunization and subcutaneous injection of the live vaccine were applied to groups I and II of 5 Bali cattle respectively. Another group (III) of 5 cattle were vaccinated with standard oli adjuvant killed vaccine intramuscularly. Cattle were observed for clinical signs and body temperatures were measured. Sera were collected monthly for 12 month and kept at -200C for further testing by ELISA. No adverse sign was observed at cattle of groups I and II after vaccination with the live vaccine. Both intranasal and subcutaneous vaccination of live vaccine showed a similar serological response which started at month-5, peaked at month-(6-7) after vaccination and still sustained at the level above positive cut-off (88 ELISA Unit) at the end of observation month-12. Cattle vaccinated with killed adjuvanted vaccine responded earlier, peaked at 5-6 month after vaccination and declined steadily till the end of investigation. At 6 and 12 months after vaccination catlle were challenged with P. multocida B:2. All vaccinated cattle challenged at 6 months (C-1) and 12 (C-2) months after vaccination survived and showed no clinical signs. Body temperatures of all vaccinated cattle were normal and ranged from 38.10C to 39.10C and 38.50C to 39.50C for cattle chalenged at C-1 and C-2 respectively. However, there was 1 cattle of group I at C-1 showed an initial increase of body temperature to 400C and decreased to normal at 42 hours after challenge. One catlle of group II had a body temperature of 40.70C detected at 5 hours post C-2 and reached a normal temperature at hour-11. Both unvaccinated cattle at C-1 and C-2 died and had body temperatures of 41.40C and 41.10C respectively at the time of death. This investigation shows that live vaccine P. multocida B:3,4 is safe and can protect cattle from haemorrhagic septicaemia for at least 12 months. This vaccine is promising to be used to replace oil adjuvanted killed bacterin for haemorrhagic secticaemia. Key words: Live aerosol vaccine, protection, haemorrhagic septicaemia, cattle

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