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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
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Articles 10 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 6, No 3 (2001): SEPTEMBER 2001" : 10 Documents clear
Technique for preparation of anaerobic microbes: Rodshaped cellulolytic bacteria Thalib, Amlius; Haryanto, B; ., Kuswandi; Hamid, H; ., Mulyani
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 6, No 3 (2001): SEPTEMBER 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (123.62 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i3.234

Abstract

Preparation of anaerobic-rod cellulolytic bacteria with coating technique has been conducted. Steps of the processes involved were cultivation, coating, evaporation, and drying. Coating agent used was Gum Arabic, and drying techniquesconducted were freeze drying and sun drying. pH of culture media was firstly optimized to obtain the maximal population ofbacteria. Both coated and uncoated preparates were subjected to drying. Morphological and Gram type identifications showed that uncoated preparate dried with freeze drying is not contaminated (ie. all bacteria are rod shape with Gram-negative type) while the one dried with sun drying is not morphologically pure (ie. containing of both rod and coccus shapes with Gram negative and positive). The coated preparates dried by both freeze and sun drying, were not contaminated (ie. all are rods with Gram-negative). The coating and drying processes decreased viability of preparates significantly. However, the decreasing of viability of coated preparate are lower than uncoated preparate (ie. 89 vs. 97%). Total count of bacteria in sun-drying coated preparate are higher (P<0.05) than the uncoated preparate (ie. 3.38 x 1010 vs.  1.97 x 1010 colony/g DM). Activity of sun-drying coated preparate to digest elephant grass and rice straw was higher (P<0.01) than the sun-drying uncoated preparate with the in vitro DMD values were 42.7 vs. 35.5% for elephant grass substrate and 29.3 vs. 24.6% for rice straw substrate. Therefore, it is concluded that coating technique has a positive effects on the preparation of rumen bacteria.   Key words : Anaerobic bacteria, coating, drying
The effect of Glyptotermes montanus termites supplementation as protein source in the diet for broiler strian Rokky-301 Uhi, Harry T; Jachja, Jajat; Mutia, Rita; Nandika, Dodi
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 6, No 3 (2001): SEPTEMBER 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (157.163 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i3.239

Abstract

Termites (Isoptera) as one of local feed in several places in Indonesia just like Irian jaya, is available, easy to find and having protein in a high level. Termites nest which high about 0,5-2 metres above ground is easy to find at all low area merauke which having land areal about 20.000 ha, otherwise in other distrik, it can easily to find in a forest especialy in a new open land for Agriculture and transmigration. The purpose of this experiment was to study the effects of Glyptotermes montanus Kemner termites suplementation as protein resource in the diet of broiler strain Rokky-301. One hundred eighty DOC Rokky-301 were randomly divided in to five treatment with three replicates of 12 chickens each. The treatment diets were basal diet (R0), basal diet + fresh termites 0,5% (R1), basal diet + fresh termites 1% (R2), basal diet + fresh termites 1,5% (R3), and Comercial diet (R4) as positive control. The chickens were fed the treatment diets over 50 days. The results showed that the chicken fed R3 diet had significantly higher body weight gain than did chicken fed other diets except for chicken fed commercial diet (R4). Feed consumption of chicken fed R0 diet was significantly higher than other treatment diets. However 1,5% fresh termites suplementation (R3) significantly reduced feed consumption. Basal diet (R0) had highest feed conversion compared to other treatment diets. However 1,5% fresh termites suplementation (R3) was significantly improved feed conversion compared to other treatment.   Key word: Body weight gain, Glyptotermes montanus termites, broiler strain Rokky-301
Latex agglutination test for field diagnosis of haemorrhagic septicaemia Natalia, Lily
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 6, No 3 (2001): SEPTEMBER 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (168.833 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i3.235

Abstract

Pasteurella multocida is bacterial pathogens that cause haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS) in cattle and buffaloes. Various tests have been used to differentiate types of P. multocida, as well as to diagnose this specific disease. A latex agglutination test has been developed for the detection of P. multocida B:2 which is the causal agent of HS. This test is a rapid and simple test suitable for local laboratorium to diagnose HS cases in the field. A heat stable antigen consisting of mainly lipopolysaccharide (LPS) extract of formalin killed P. multocida 0019 was used to produce specific antibody against P. multocida B:2. The antiboy was then used to sensitise latex particles. Latex agglutination test have been used to screen some P. multocida field isolates and this test have been proven to be specific, simple and easy to be used in detecting P. multocida B:2. The specificity is due to antibodies recognising LPS or LPS protein complexes. Sensitised latex was stable at 4° C for at least12 months. This test should be used as an aid to diagnosis and employed principally to confirm and support clinical and post mortem findings of HS.   Keywords: Pasteurella multocida B:2, haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS), diagnosis, latex agglutination test
Metabolism in compensatory growth. V. Effect of undegraded protein in compensatory growth Mahyudin, Prappti
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 6, No 3 (2001): SEPTEMBER 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (180.962 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i3.240

Abstract

An experiment was designed to study the effect of increasing availability of amino acids in growing animal fed maintenance diet and which previously subjected to underfeeding. Twelve wether Iambs were divided into 3 treatment groups, each was fed pelleted lucerne (Medicago sativa). The treatments were: diet at maintenance energy level (M), M + 60 g formaldehyde treatedcasein(M + HCHO-casein) and ad libitum. The increase in protein consumption increased nitrogen (N) retention, although the highest efficiency of N retention occurred in animal fed M diet (0.36) compared to those fed M + HCHO-casein (0.31) or ad libitum diet (0.2). Provision of amino acids by supplementation of 60 g HCHO-casein resulted in an increment of 19 g glucose/d or 32 g glucose/lOO g protein. Glucose entry rate (GER) increased with increasing digestible crude protein. Although GER was not different between animals on M and M + HCHO-casein diet, the uptake of glucose in the hind-limb muscles of animals on the M + HCHO-casein was twice (0. 18mM) than that of animals on the M diet (0.08 mM). There was a significant effect on the uptake and output of essential amino acids, leucine, isoleucine, lysine and threonine and non-essential amino acids, tyrosine and glutamine as levels of protein in the diet increased. Supplementation with HCHO-casein increased the arterial blood concentration of branch chain amino acids (BCAA) by 76 % and phenylalanine by 61 %. In general there was an increase in the arterial concentration of amino acids in animals fed either M + HCHO-casein or ad libitum. However, this increase was followed by increased amino acids oxidation, which showed in increased urea excretion. There was a positive correlation between urinary urea and N intake, suggesting that amino acids were not fully utilized for protein synthesis or protein deposition.   Key words: Compensatory growth, amino acid, N retension
SDR-2 as a strong candidate vaccine for brucellosis in animals Sanam, Maxs U.E
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 6, No 3 (2001): SEPTEMBER 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (171.849 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i3.236

Abstract

Various mutant strains of Brucella suis type-1 have been recently developed including SDR-2 and SD-7. This research was aimed at revealing the course of infection and serological reactions, as well as the protection capacity of these mutant strainscompared to the reference vaccine strain 19, and the virulent strain B. suis type-1 in Quackenbush mice as a model. Antibody reactions were measured by an Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and degree of infection was determined by bacterial spleen count. The results showed that the SD-7 was unable to perform infection in mice. Whereas SDR-2, strain 19 and the virulent B. suis type-1 were able to colonize the mice spleens with varying rate of infections. The inoculation of SDR-2 to the mice produced mild infection and lasted shorter than the virulent strain even with the reference vaccine strain 19. The number of SDR-2 and strain 19 organisms were sharply dropped at week-12 post inoculation while that of virulent strain was significantly remained high. Serological responses induced by SDR-2 was the lowest followed by those of strain 19, and the virulent strain. On the challenge with a virulent B. suis, histological examinations of the spleen of the control mice revealed that there was a marked depletion of lymphoid cells and reticuloendothelial hyperplasia in lymphoid follicles. However no significant pathological changes were observed in groups inoculated with either SDR-2 or Strain 19. Enumeration of survival challenge organisms in the spleens clearly demonstrated that SDR-2 provided significant protection (2.17 Log10) to the animals which was comparable to that provided by strain-19 (2.20 Log10). In conclusion, SDR-2 has a potential as a vaccine for use in pigs against Brucella suis infection. Furthermore SDR-2 offers some advantages over strain 19 in that it is less virulent and induces less antibody responses than the strain 19 and thus may have application in other animals. However, furher study on its efficacy as a vaccine for brucellosis in pigs as the primary host for B. suis needs to be assessed.   Key words: Brucella suis, mutant strains, SDR-2 vaccine, strain 19, antibody
Clinical responses of vaccinated Bali cattle against challenge with a field isolate of Bovine Herpesvirus- 1 ., Sudarisman
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 6, No 3 (2001): SEPTEMBER 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (145.857 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i3.241

Abstract

The aim of this study is to investigate the post challenge clinical responses of Bali cattle vaccinated with an inactivated vaccine of a field isolate Bovine Herpesvirus-1 after being challenged with the same virus. Twenty eight Bali cattle were divided into two groups of ten animals, one of which was vaccinated with a single dose and the other one was vaccinated with a booster dose of vaccination, and the rest of the animals were remained untreated as a control group. One month after the last vaccination, a half number of animals in each group were challenged intravenously with 5 x 108 TCID 50 pathogenic strain of BHV-1 local isolate. Clinical signs were observed from day 0 to day 14 after challenge. These observed included body temperature, mucosal membrane changes of nostril, vagina and palpebrae, hyperlacrimation and hypersecretion of nose and eyes. General clinical changes and mucous membrane lesions of nostril were scored from 0 to 3. The results showed that the non-vaccinated animals: elevated temperature (up to 40.1°C), hyperlacrimation, nasal discharge and mucosal hyperaemia of nostril and vagina after challenge. The duration of illness ranged from 3 to 7 days. Symptoms appeared after an incubation periode of 3 days and disappeared after 5 days (day 9). These clinical symptoms didn’t appear on the vaccinated animals with single or boostered vaccination. One month after vaccination, the antibody titre reached 211 (2048) based on serum neutralisation test (SNT). These vaccinated animals showed good immune respons to BHV-1.   Key words: Clinical responses, inactivated vaccine, field isolate, BHV-1, Bali cattle
The effect of feeding mixtures of banana trunk and soybean meal on lambs performance Mathius, I-W; Yulistiani, D; Puastuti, w; Martawidjaja, M
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 6, No 3 (2001): SEPTEMBER 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (150.229 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i3.232

Abstract

This study was intended to determine the effects of increasing the ratio of banana trunk to soybean meal on intake, nitrogen excretion and lambs performance. Sixteen lambs (averaging 21.21 + 1.69 kg) were pen individually and fed a basal diet consisted of chopped fresh king grass and commercial concentrate and unlimited access of water. Lambs were randomly assigned to one out of four different ratio of banana trunk to soybean meal as feed supplements, i.e. (R0) 0:1; (R1) 1:1; (R2) 2:1 and (R3) 4:1. Results showed that the inclusion of banana trunk had no adverse effect on lambs performance. As it is expected, altering the ratio of banana trunk to soybean meal increased (P < 0.05) dry matter intake of forage as well as total dry matter intake. The digestion coefficient of dietary ration was not affected (P >0.05) by feed supplement. Despite of no difference was observed in the coefficient of nitrogen digestibility, apparent fecal and urine N-output were significantly (P < 0.05) affected. The highest ratio of fed supplement (R3) tended to decrease nitrogen retention. Overall data indicated that lambs offered basal diet supplemented with R2 treatment accumulated more N per-day, than those fed other treatments, and consequently lambs performance was the best on those fed R2 treatment.   Key words: Banana trunk, protected protein, lambs
Improvement of nutritive value of acacia mangium bark by alkali treatment Wina, Elizabeth; Toharmat, Toto; Astuti, Widia
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 6, No 3 (2001): SEPTEMBER 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (156.111 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i3.237

Abstract

Bark, especially from Acacia mangium is a by-product from wood processing industries that commonly found in Indonesiaand in big amount will cause environmental problems. One of the alternatives to utilize bark is for animal feed. The aims of this experiment are to improve the nutritive value of bark by alkali treatments (urea and sodium hydroxide) and to determine the level of substitution of elephant grass by bark. The experiment consisted of 3 in vitro studies and 1 in sacco study. In vitro studies consisted of 1) the use of urea or NaOH by wetting and incubation-method, 2) the use of different concentration of Na OH (0-4%) by soaking method, 3) determination of substitution level of elephant grass by treated bark. In sacco study was conducted at 0, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 hours of incubation to compare the degradation of treated bark to elephant grass. The results show that urea treatment did not improve DM or OM digestibilities of bark. Soaking bark in 4% NaOH solution was more effective than wetting and incubation-method in improving in vitro digestibility. (49.26% vs19.56% for soaking and dry-method, respectively). In sacco studyl shows that treated bark had a very high solubility at 0 hour incubation but the degradation at 72 hours incubation was not significantly different from that of 0 hour incubation. The gas produced at in vitro study of treated bark was very low indicated that there was no degradation of bark at all. The level of substitution of elephant grass by treated bark up to 30% gave a non-significant digestibility value to that of 100% elephant grass. In conclusion, bark after tannin-extraction was a better feedstuff for animal feed. The soaking method in 4% NaOH solution improved the digestibility of bark significantly and the level of substitution of elephant grass by treated bark was 30%.   Key words: Bark, acacia mangium, urea, sodium hydroxide, digestibility
The residue of trenbolone from male Garut sheep which implanted by trenbolone acetate Widiastuti, R; ., Indraningsih; Murdiarti, T.B; Firmansyah, R
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 6, No 3 (2001): SEPTEMBER 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (139.817 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i3.233

Abstract

Trenbolone acetate (TBA) is a growth hormone promoter which is implanted into animal to increase the body weight. The implantation of TBA in animal may cause the occurrence of residues of TBA and its metabolite (17-β-trenbolone). The presence of the residue might threat to human health. The aim of this research work was to study the presence of the residue of trenbolone in male Garut sheep which is implanted by TBA. The sheep were divided into 2 groups, those were D1 which were implanted by 40 mg TBA and D2 which were implanted by 60 mg TBA. One animal each from D1 and D2 were killed in the week 1, 2, 3 and 4 after implantation. And 24 hours before slaughtering the urine of D1 and D2 were collected using the metabolism cages. The samples for residue analysis were the organs such as liver, kidney, and the muscles around the implantation sites i.e inner and outer, upper front leg and upper back leg. The samples were extracted by organic solvents and analysed by HPLC. The residue of trenbolone occured in all samples of D1 and D2 which killed on 1 and 2 weeks after implantation. The residues occured on those which were killed 3 weeks after implantation were only in inner and outer samples. The residues in meat and organs were not detected in D1 nor D2 which were killed 4 weeks after implantation. The residue of trenbolone was also detected in the urine and still were detected in D1 and D2 which implanted by TBA for 4 weeks.   Key words : trenbolone acetate, 17-β-trenbolone, residue, sheep
In vitro embryo production through modification of time and gonadotropin hormone during oocytes maturation Triwulaninngsih, Endang; Toelihere, M.R; Rutledge, J.J; Yusuf, T.L; Purwantara, B; Diwyanto, K
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 6, No 3 (2001): SEPTEMBER 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (221.222 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i3.238

Abstract

This research has been conducted at the laboratory of in vitro fertilization of the University of Wisconsin, USA. These embryos can be used for improving genetic value of Indonesian cattle. There is transportation constraint in importing oocytes from USA. It takes more than 24 hours to bring it to Indonesia. In fact, oocytes maturation and ready to be fertilized normally requires only 24 hours in 5% CO2 incubator at 38.5°C. Therefore, this research is needed to study the effect of gonadotropin hormone and time for oocyte maturity and ready to be fertilized at a period more than 24 hours. If this problem could be solved then the importation of oocytes could be cheaper and easier than importation of life animals or embryos. Ovaries were collected from slaughterhouse in Wisconsin. Oocytes were matured in TCM-199 medium in 5% CO2 incubator and at 30°C enriched with FSH 10 μl/ml, oestradiol 17 β 1μl/ml and 10 % FCS as control of gonadotropin hormone treatment (A); with FSH 10 μl/ml (B); with oestradiol 17 β 1μl/ml (C) and without gonadotropin hormone (D) for 24 hours, 30 hours and 36 hours as time of maturation treatment I, II and III respectively. The oocytes were fertilized in vitro with motile sperm selection by Percoll gradient and incubation between sperm and oocytes in fertilization media (TALP) for 20 hours. All zygotes were cultured in modification of KSOM medium up to blastocyst and were fed serum 5 μl/50 μl medium on day 6. Data were analyzed by SAS program. Percentage of cleavage between time of maturation were significant (p<0.01); between gonadotropin hormone treatment A vs B and A vs C and B vs C and B vs D and between A vs D were significant (p<0.01), but between treatment C vs D were not significant (p>0.05). Percentage of blastocyst between time of maturation were not significant (p>0.05), but between gonadotropin hormone treatment A vs B and A vs C and B vs D and C vs D were significant (p<0.01), but between treatment A vs D and B vs C were not significant (p>0.05). Percentage of cleavage, morula, blastocyst, expanded blastocyst and unertilized  ova on this study are 66.73%, 22.43%, 40.33%, 0.81% and 32.51 for 24 hours incubation (I); 61.55%, 25.69%, 32.69%,  0.54% and 27.61% for 30 hours incubation (II); 72.43%, 32.06%, 37.97%, 0.0% and 25.31% for 36 hours incubation (III) respectively. According to this study, in vitro production of embryo could be conducted at 30°C and incubation on maturation media for more than 24 hours.   Key words: Oocytes, cleavage, embryos, blastocyst

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