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Contact Name
Ahmadi Riyanto
Contact Email
medpub@litbang.deptan.go.id
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ahmadi_puslitbangnak@yahoo.com
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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 7 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 6, No 2 (2001): JUNE 2001" : 7 Documents clear
Increasing milk production ability of lactating cows through improvement of feeding managemen Siregar, Sori B
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 6, No 2 (2001): JUNE 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (126.985 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i2.222

Abstract

Increasing milk production ability of lactating cows through improvement of feeds and feeding frequency was conducted at Tanjungsari Village Cooperative. Fifteen lactating cows of 3-4 months of lactation period were used. The cows were divided into five groups based on their average daily milk production and lactation period. The treatment consisted of RO (control=commonly practiced by farmers), R1 (2.5 kg. concentrate, given three times per head per day). R2 (2 kg. Concentrate plus 13.5 kg roughage given three times per head per day). The experimental design was completely randomized block design. The quality of concentrate given to the lactating cows was a better than that given by the local farmers. Improving feed supplementation and feeding frequency significantly (P<0.01) increased the consumption of dry matter, crude protein and  energy of the feeds, and thus increased daily milk production, solid non fat (SNF) and total solid (TS) of the milk (P<0.05). Specific gravity of the milk was not affected by the treatments (P>0.05). Substitution of 0.5 kg concentrate with 13.5 kg roughage resulted in non significant difference on the daily milk production as well as the quality of the milk, thus it gave no economic impact. The increase of daily milk production was followed by the increase of the incomes of the farmers by Rp 905 to Rp 1,425 per head per day. The result of the experiment leads to the assumption that the present feeding practices of the lactating cows should be improved accordingly.   Key words: Lactating cows, feeding, management
The potential, variety, and nutrient content of natural vegetation as feedstuffs grown under cashewnut plantation Sutedi, E; Mathius, I-W; Suratmini, NIP; ButarButar, S. Oloan; Manurung, T; Yuhaeni, S; Panjaitan, Tanda S.; Muzaini, A
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 6, No 2 (2001): JUNE 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (133.277 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i2.227

Abstract

Ruminant production is limited by the quality, the sufficiency and the continuation of feed supply, especially during the dry season. The objective of the study was to find out the potency, type and quality of natural vegetation grown under cashewnut plantation. The study was carried out by exploration of existing natural vegetation resources in cashewnut plantation area. Results showed that native pasture growing under cashewnut plantation area comprised of dry-tolerant grasses and legumes, such as Setaria sp., Themeda sp., Calopogonium mucunoides, and Desmodium sp. The fresh yield and the dry matter production of natural vegetation grown under less than eight years old of cashewnut plantation was lower compared to those grown under cashewnut plantation of more than eight years old. This may be due to shading by the tree crop, which is known to reduce the photosynthetically active radiation reaching the ground of vegetation. It seems that, light is the critical factor affecting the growth of vegetation underneath tree canopies. Carrying capacity of native forages grown under cashewnut plantation was only 0.5 animal unit of ruminant/ha/year.   Key words: Natural vegetation, cashewnut plantation, carrying capacity
Effect of age on hepatic lipogenic enzyme activities and fat accumulation in broiler chicks Santoso, U; Tanaka, K
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 6, No 2 (2001): JUNE 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (162.058 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i2.223

Abstract

The present study was conducted to evaluate effect of age on hepatic lipogenic enzyme activities and lipid fraction in broiler chicks. Eighty broiler chicks were distributed into one group. Broilers were fed commercial diet and provided drinking water ad libitum. At 5, 10, 12, 15, 17,20,22,25,27, and 56 days of age (27, 42, and 56 days of age for serum and carcass collection), 5 chicks were selected based on weights and killed. Experimental results show that the older chicks would have lower specific activity of hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and fatty acid synthetase (F AS) activities (P<0,01). Age influenced hepatic triglyceride (P<0.05), serum cholesterol ester and free cholesterol (P<O.OI). The older chicks had higher serum phospholipid and triglyceride (P<0.01). The older chicks had higher carcass fat and abdominal fat (P<0,01), and lower carcass moisture (P<0.05). In conclusion, the older chicks had lower specific activities of hepatic ACC and FAS (lipogenic enzymes) with higher lipid accumulation.   Key words: Age, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthetase, lipid accumulation, broiler chicks
The development of fowl cholera vaccine: II. Pathogenicity and vaccine protection of Pasteurella multocida local isolates in experimental ducks ., Supar; Setiadi, Yudi; ., Djaenuri; Kurniasih, Nina; Poerwadhikarta, B; ., Sjafei
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 6, No 2 (2001): JUNE 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (141.931 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i2.228

Abstract

Pasteurellosis or fowl cholera in ducks occurs sporadically along the year in many high duck population areas of Java and other parts of Indonesia. Some isolates of Pasteurella multocida from ducks and chicken are kept at the BALITVET culture collection. The aims of this research were to evaluate the pathogenicity of local isolates and imported strains of P. multocida and to study the pasteurellosis local isolate vaccine and protection assay in ducks. Two imported strains of P. multocida (BCC 1359, BCC 1362) and 6 local isolates (BCC 299, BCC 2331, DY1, DY2, 12TG, 15TG) were used in this study. In the pathogenicity assays the imported strains and local isolates were activated in mice and in duct and then in brain hearth infusion broth containing 5% normal sheep serum. Each of broth culture was diluted, each dilution (102 and 104) of strains or isolates was injected intraperitoneally into a group of normal ducks. Antigen for vaccine, each was produced in sheep blood (5%) agar. Cells were harvested and killed with 0.1% formalin. Monovalent, bivalent, and polyvalent vaccines were prepared, at concentration equal to the Macfarland standard tube No 10, and each was adjuvanted with alhydrogel at final concentration of 1.5%. Each vaccine type was injected into a group of 10 week old ducks (8 animals per group), with 0.2 ml/injection. Four weeks later each animal in group were boostered with the same vaccine, dose, route as the previous injection. Before vaccination each animal was bleed through wing vena, then every two weeks, serum was collected and stored at -20oC. Two weeks after boostered, three days after the last blood sample collection, half animal of each group were challenged intraperitonelly with the BCC 2331 and half with DY2 live broth culture. The pathogenicity assays showed the only BCC 2331 and DY2 killed the experimental ducks, the other did not. The animals vaccinated with either BCC 2331,  DY2 or bivalent (BCC 2331+DY2) vaccines were protected with either life bacterial challenged of either BCC 2331 or DY2 local isolates. It is likely, P. multocida BCC 2331 and DY2 isolates can be used for pasteurellosis candidate vaccine used in Indonesia, but it still needs more studies in the immunological of protective antigens.   Key words: Pasteurella multocida, fowl cholera, ducks, vaccine, protection
Antibody response and protection of inactivated-local isolate vaccine for infectious bronchitis in laying chicken Indriani, Risa; ., Darminto
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 6, No 2 (2001): JUNE 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (161.334 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i2.231

Abstract

Infectious bronchitis (IB) is an acute highly contagious viral respiratory disease of poultry caused by Coronavirus. IBV infection consists of many serotypes and can only be controlled by vaccination. An effective IB vaccine should be prepared from local isolates, due to the antigenic variation among serotypes. The aims of this research were to develop inactivated IB vaccine derived from IBV local isolate and to determine the efficacy of that vaccine in layer flocks. Five layer chicken groups were used in this experiments, group I was vaccinated with commercial IBV live vaccine thrice, group II was vaccinated with commercial IBV live vaccine once and repeated with inactivated local IBV isolate twice, group III was vaccinated with commercial IBV live vaccine once and repeated with commercial inactivated twice, group IV was vaccinated with IBV live vaccine once, and group V was not vaccinated. After the chickens reached at a stable egg production they were challenged with IBV local isolates. Antibody responses were examined by means of haemagglutination hibitition (HI) test and HI titres were expressed as log2 of the reciprocal of the highest dilution of serum causing inhibition of a log2 HA titre of 2. The mean titres of antibody responses of chicken in group I, II, III, IV, and V was 4.9 ± 0.87, 6.8 ± 0.97, 7.7 ± 0.46, 2.9 ± 0.94, and 2.0 ± 1.67 respectively. The levels of protection against challenges were determined by viral isolation, this in group I, II, III, IV, and V was 63, 73, 60, 50, and 0% respectively. Clinical symptom of egg quality was slightly reduced in group I, IV, and V and it were unchanged in group II and III. Group II gave better in number of egg  production than the other groups. The results indicated that the IBV inactivated localisolate vaccine gave high titres of  antibody and higher protection rates than that of commercial IBV inactivated vaccine. Inaddition, IBV local isolate vaccinated group prevented from declining egg production after challenged with IBV local isolate.   Key words: Infectious bronchitis, layer, antibody titre, vaccine, challenge virus
Performance of native chicken given free choice feed Kompiang, I.P; ., Supriyati; Togatorop, M.H; Jarmani, S.N
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 6, No 2 (2001): JUNE 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (131.376 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i2.224

Abstract

An experiment was conducted to study the effect of free choice feeding on the performance of native chicken and to determine its protein and energy requirements for growth. Eight hundreds and seventy 2-weeks old native chicken were used, and divided into three treatment groups, with 5 replicates: (I) Complete feed (II) Choice feed A (two levels of protein, similar in energy content) and (III) Choice feed B (energy and protein sources). Feed and water were given ad libitum during the 10 weeks trial. Feed intake (protein and energy) and body weight were recorded biweekly. Body weight gain (BWG) of treatment I was 852 + 33 grams/head, similar to treatment II, 858 + 28 grams/head, and both significantly (P<0.05) better than treatment III (800 + 42 grams/head). Energy consumption and its energy efficiency ratio (EER) value were similar for all treatments, 9226 + 149; 9203 + 739, and 8706 + 383 kcal/head and 10.84 + 0.34, 10.75 + 1.03, and 10.89 + 0.27 kcal/gram for treatment I, II and III, respectively. There was a significant (P<0.05) difference between treatment on protein intake, 556 + 8, 506 + 15, and 454 + 25 grams/head for treatment I, II, and III, respectively. Protein energy ratio (PER) value of treatment III (0.57 ± 0.02) was similar to treatment II (0.57 ± 0.02) and both were significantly better (P<0.05) than treatment I (0.65 ± 0.02). It was concluded that the native chicken, given a correct choice of feed, has an ability to determine its energy and protein requirements. During the growth periods, 2-12 weeks old, the bird require feed with 16% protein and 2900 kcal metabolized energy/kg.   Key word: Native chicken, feeding system, free choice
The effect of “patikan kebo”(Euphorbia hirta L) preparations on erythrocyte number, haemoglobin level and haematocrit value of chicken infected with Eimeria tenella Wardhana, April H; Kencanawati, E; ., Nurmawati; ., Rahmaweni; Jatmiko, C.B
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 6, No 2 (2001): JUNE 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (163.358 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i2.229

Abstract

Patikan kebo” (Euphorbia hirta L) is a medicinal plant mostly used to treat gastro-intestinal track problems empirically. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of distillation, infusion and extract of “patikan kebo” (Euphorbia hirta L) preparations on erythrocyte number, haemoglobin level and haematocrit value in chickens that were infected by Eimeria tenella. Twenty four Hubbard strain broiler chicken raised from one-day-old until three-week-old were used for this study and divided randomly into 4 groups: P 0 (control), P I (distillation treatment), P II (infusion treatment), and P III (extract treatment). A total of 5.000 oocyst of E. tenella were infected into each chicken and the dose of Euphorbia hirta L was 500 mg/kg Wb. A completely randomized design was used and the data were tested by ANOVA. The result indicated that distillation, infusion and extract preparations of Euphorbia hirta L had the potency to increase erythrocyte number, haemoglobin level and haematocrit value.   Key word : Eimeria tenella, Euphorbia hirta L, erythrocyte, haemaoglobin, haematocrit

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