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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
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Articles 17 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 6, No 1 (2001)" : 17 Documents clear
The effects of proline, carnitine on the viability of sperm stored at 5oC (chilled semen) Situmorang, Polmer; Triwulanningsih, E; Lubis, A; Caroline, W; Sugiarti, T
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 6, No 1 (2001)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (147.85 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i1.211

Abstract

An experiment was carried out to evaluate the addition of proline, carnitine in Tris-extender on the viability of bull sperm following storage at 5oC. Semen was collected by means of artificial vagina (AV), diluted in Tris-extender containing 5% V/V egg yolk (EY) and 4% V/V glycerol to get a final concentration of 50 million sperms/ml. Diluted semen cooled to 5oC for 45 minute and stored at those temperature for 1, 3, 10, and 13 days. In the first activity the addition of 15, 30 and 60 mM carnitine in Tris-extender while in the second activity the inclusion of 15, 30, and 60 mM proline on the viability of sperm was investigated. Addition of carnitine to Tris-extender signifinatly increase (P<0.05) the viability of sperm after storage for more than 3 days. At 3 days of storage, the mean %M and %L were 27.3, 38.8, 33.5, 53.0, 31.8, 47.0, and 30.5, 46.8 for control 15, 30, and 60 mM carnitine respectively. The similar results was obtained for 7 days of storage where the mean %M and %L for control (12.5 and 27.3) was significantly lower (P<0.05) than those 15, 30, and 60 mM carnitine (15.0, 33.5, 18.8, 36.5, 17.5, 36.3). The superiority of carnitine was maintained for 10 days of storage, where the mean %L were 23.5, 28.8, 31.5, and 30.3 for control; 15; 30; and 60 mM respectively. There was no any significant within concentration of carnitine tested (15 to 60 mM).The condition of apical ridge was not significantly affected by carnitine. In the second activity, inclusion of proline to Trisextender statistically (P<0.05) improved the viability of sperm after storage for 7 and 13 days. After 7 days of storage the mean %M and %L were 31.4, 36.4, 38.8, 40.4, 36.6, 42.7, and 34.8, 43.3 for control; 15, 30, and 60 mM proline respectively. The significant effects of proline was remain for 13 days of storage where the mean %M and % L were 24.6, 32.9, 28.6, 37.5, 29.1, 39.8, and 30.1, 37.3 for control; 15, 30, and 60 mM proline respectively. There was no significant difference within the concentration of proline. Condition of apical ridge was not significantly affected by proline.   Key words: Sperm, viability, carnitine, proline
Improvement of feed efficiency using protected-energy in the ration of ewes Mathius, I-W; Yulistiani, Dwi; Wina, E; Haryanto, B; Wilson, A; Thalib, A
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 6, No 1 (2001)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (141.088 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i1.212

Abstract

High producing ewes required high amounts of energy, which can not be met through feeding conventional ration. Therefore, supplementing energy should be done, especially protected-energy. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of additional of protected fat/energy on the consumption of ration and the performance of ewes and lambs. Thirty-four local ewes were randomly allotted to four levels of by-pass energy groups, in which parts of energy content in the concentrate was replaced with rumen-protected fatty acids in the proportion of 0 (R1), 5 (R2), 10 (R3), and 20% (R4). Consumption, nutrient digestibility and animal performance (ewes and lambs) were determined by standard procedures. Results showed that the daily dry matter intake during pregnancy (g/kg BW0.75) did not differ among diet (72.1 + 2.56). The crude fibre intake varied slightly between treatment (P>0.05), those being slightly lower intake on the highest replacement of energy content in concentrate diet (R4). Dry matter digestibility were 52.4 + 0.24, 52.1 + 0.30; 51.8 +0.28; and 51.3 + 0.81 in groups R1, R2, R3, and R4, respectively, which were non-significantly different from each other. These results confirmed that the by-pass energy sources replacements did not affect rumen fermentation. The same tendency was also found for crude protein digestibility (P>0.05) i.e. 60.1; 61.8; 61.2; and 60.2 for R1, R2, R3, and R4 respectively. The average daily gain of ewes during gestation period was affected (P<0.05) by by-pass energy replacement and the effect was linear with increasing by-pass energy replacement. Significant difference was not found in the total birth weight of lambs and among dietary treatments. Lambs growth rate during the first 8 week of lactation was the highest on ewes fed diet containing the highest amount of by-pass energy sources (R4). It can be concluded that by-pass fatty acids can be used in ewes’ ration without affecting rumen fermentation and gave a positive respons to animal performance.   Key words: By-pass energy, ewes ration, gestation and lactating phase
Effect of feeding system and fermented sago waste on performance of broiler chicken Kompiang, I Putu; ., Supriyati
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 6, No 1 (2001)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (129.871 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i1.213

Abstract

An experiment, with a split plot experimental design, was conducted to determine the effect of feeding system (full vs choice feeding) and fermented sago waste (AST 5 vs 0%) on the performance of broiler chickens. Complete feed was formulated tocontain 21% crude protein, 2900 kcal ME/kg, without or with 5% AST. Feed for choice feeding was formulated to contain 2900 kcal ME/kg, without or with 5% AST with crude protein 23 or 17%. Four hundreds DOC broilers were used for each treatment divided into 4 replicates (100 birds/replicate) on litter system. Feed and water were given ad lib. during the 4 weeks trial. Data collected included feed consumption (weekly), body weight (bi-weekly), feed conversion ratio (FCR) and protein efficiency ratio (PER) were calculated biweekly. Feeding system has no significant effect on total feed/energy consumption. Choice feeding reduced total protein consumption (P<0.01; 323.5 vs 354.9 gram/head/4weeks), increased body weight gained (P<0.01; 889.5 vs 835 gram/head/4weeks), improved FCR (P<0.05; 1.90 vs 2.03), and PER (P<0.001; 0.37 vs 0.43). Fermented sago waste (AST) had no significant effect on total feed/energy consumption (P<0.05), reduced total protein consumption (P<0.05; 333.6 vs 349.8 gram/head/4weeks), increased body weight gained (P<0.05; 887.5 vs 837 gram/head/4weeks), improved FCR (P<0.05; 1.88 vs 2.06) and PER (P<0.05; 0.38 vs 0.42). It is concluded that broiler chicken had an ability to determine its protein requirement, and AST supplementation significantly improved performance of the birds.   Key words: Choice feeding, fermented sago waste, broiler, FCR, PER
Crossbreeding between male pelung and female selected native chicken at second generation (G2) Gunawan, Benny; Sartika, Tike
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 6, No 1 (2001)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (124.002 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i1.214

Abstract

  The experiment aimed to produce native chicken with faster growth rate that is to achieve body weight of more than 1 kg at 3 months of age. Three hundreds and thirty three crossbreeds (PK) day old chicken from the results of artificial insemination between male Pelung and second generation of selection of female native chicken, were used in this experiment. One hundred and eighty purebreds native chickens were also used as control population. They were put in grower cages with density of 10 birds per cage and each cage was treated as a single unit of replication. Feeds during experiment were given and divided into 3 phases that is Starter Feeds I (Protein 21% and Energy 3000 kcal/kg) for chicken between 0-21 days of age, Starter Feeds II (Protein 19% and Energy 2900 kcal/kg) for chicken between 22-42 days and Grower Feeds (Protein 17% and Energy 2900 kcal/kg) for chicken between 43-84 days. Variables which were recorded were weekly body weight until 12 weeks of age, feed consumption, feed conversion, mortality, carcass weight and simple economic ratio (B/C ratio). The results of the experiment showed that body weight at 12 weeks of crossbred (PK) was significantly higher than the pure native chicken (1000 vs 923 g) (P<0.05). Feed consumption was not significantly different (3037 vs 3036 g/bird/12 weeks), but the feed conversion of the crossbred was significantly better than the purebred (3.09 vs 3.4) (P<0.05). Carcass weight and carcass components were not significantly different between the two breeds, but they were different between sexes (P<0.05). Simple economic calculation showed that crossbreeds produced higher profit than purebreds with the benefit cost ratio were 1.31 for crossbred (PK) and 1.2 for purebred native chicken. The mortality rate during the experiment was low, that is 5.5% for crossbred and 6.36% for purebred.   Key words: Crossbreeding, male Pelung, female native chicken
Utilization of palm oil sludge in poultry diet: 2. Dried palm oil sludge and its fermented product for growing drakes Sinurat, Arnold P; Bintang, I.A.K; Purwadaria, T; Pasaribu, T
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 6, No 1 (2001)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (133.792 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i1.215

Abstract

Inclusion limit of palm oil sludge (POS) in poultry diet varies according to processing, and species or strain of the animal. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to study the utilization of fermented (FPOS) and non-fermented palm oil sludge (POS) for growing drakes. A number of 224 one week-old male ducklings were randomly distributed into 7 dietary treatments, with 4 replicates and 8 ducklings for each replicate. The dietary treatment consists of 2 kinds of feedstuffs (POS and FPOS) with 3 levels (5, 10, and 15%) and one control diet consisting neither POS nor FPOS. All diets were formulated with similar nutrient contents and meet the requirement of growing duckling and fed to 8 weeks old. The results showed that at the first week of the trial, feeding of POS or FPOS significantly (P<0.05) depressed growth of the ducklings, although the feed consumption was higher than the control. However, overall performances (body weight, feed consumption and feed conversion) of the ducklings, carcass yield, liver weight, gizzard weight and abdominal fat weight measured at the end of the trial were not significantly (P>0.05) affected by the dietary treatments. Therefore, it is concluded that it is safe to include POS or FPOS up to 15% in the diet of growing ducklings.   Key words: Palm oil sludge, fermentation, ducks, growth
Detection of deletion and mutation on pig Mx1 gene (gene resistance to influenza virus) with PCR-RFLP Nar I restriction Sumantri, Cece; Morzumi, T; Hamashima, N
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 6, No 1 (2001)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (134.075 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i1.216

Abstract

The study was done to detect the incident of deletion and mutation in exon 14th of Mx1 gene in pig. Six hundred base pairs at the position (1937 to 2537) of the 14th exon of the pig Mx1 gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from 15 breed of pig DNA sample. The amplified PCR products were digested by Nar I enzyme that called restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technique. The results show genetic polymorphism at the 14th exon of pig Mx1 gene. The Nar I digested revealed three phenotyphic variation (C/C, C/N and N/N, designated for Nar I cut homozygote, heterozygote and for Nar I no cut homozygote, respectively). The Nar I (N/N or C/N) type is corresponding to (1) the deletion 11 bp at the position 2064 to 2075. This type was observed in Landrace breed. (2) the incidence of two point mutation at the position 2065 Guanine (G) change to Thymine (T) and at the position 2124 Guanine (G) change to Adenine (A).This type was observed in Chinese native pig (Meishan) and Vietnamese native pig.   Key words: Deletion, mutation, pig Mx1 gene and PCR-RFLP
The productivity of various pure breed and cross breed of imported pigs during lactation period Aritonang, Djamuara; Silalahi, Marsudin
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 6, No 1 (2001)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (127.351 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i1.217

Abstract

A study has been conducted to evaluate the productivity of pure breeds and cross breeds of imported pigs. Sixteen strains of pigs with five best sows were selected based on litter size and birth weight on the second parity. The results of the study showed that the pure breed performance was better than the cross breeds, as shown by the litter size, birth and weaned weight, less mortality, better mothering ability and better feed efficiency. Between pure breed, the Landrace and Yorkshire were better than other sows and between the cross breed, the LH and YL performed better than other crossbreeds. It is recommended that the pure breed especially Landrace and Yorkshire and LH and YL of cross breed are better than others   Key words: Productivity, imported pigs, lactation
Effect of temperature and time of pasteurization on the milk quality during storage ., Abubakar; ., Triyantini; Sunarlim, R; Setiyanto, H; ., Nurjannah
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 6, No 1 (2001)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (145.501 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i1.218

Abstract

A study on the effect of temperature and time of pasteurization on the milk quality during storage was carried out using fresh milk. The aim of the experiment was to asses the storage time of pasteurized milk for consumption without nutrient losses. A completely randomized factorial design, 2 x 8 was used, with pasteurization temperature (T), consisted of 2 levels, the low temperature long time (LTLT), i.e. fresh milk was warmed at 65oC for 30 minutes (T1) and the high temperature short time (HTST), i.e. fresh milk was warmed at 71oC for 15 seconds (T2); and storage time (S), consisted of 8 levels, i.e. 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, and 21 hours respectively, as the factors, with 3 replicates. Parameters measured were alcohol test, water, fat, and protein concentrations, and microbial population of pasteurized milk during storage. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance and simple linear regression. The result showed that water and fat concentrations and microbial population was not significantly different (P>0.05) in pasteurization temperature treatment, but was significantly different (P<0.05) due to storage time treatment. Meanwhile, the protein concentration was significantly different (P<0.05) either in pasteurization temperature or storage time. It was concluded that pasteurized milk was still suitable for consumption at 15-21 hours storage, while protein concentration tended to be better when was pasteurized at 65oC.   Key words: Pasteurized milk, storage quality
Aging meat at room and cold temperatures on meat quality and aging loss of sheep carcass Sunarlim, Roswita; Setiyanto, Hadi
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 6, No 1 (2001)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (134.638 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i1.219

Abstract

The aim of this research is to compare the quality of meat of local carcass sheep between fresh and aging meat stored at room temperature for 12 hours, at 4oC for one day and one week. For that purpose a study of aging carcass involving 12 local sheep (male and female with different ages) was carried out by separating carcass into two parts: (1) the right portion was aged on 4oC for one day and one week, room temperature for 12 hours, and (2) the left portion as control without aging. A factorial design 2x2 (2 sexes and aging vs without aging) for three kinds of aging on quality of meat. A factorial design 2x3 (2 sexes and 3 kinds of aging) on aging loss. Replicate twice was carried out with different ages (old and young sheep). Parameter measured were pH, warter-holding capacity, cooking loss, color, tenderness, carcass weight loss. There was decrease in pH, increase in tenderness value for aged meat that stored at room temperature for 12 hours (1.84 kg), at cold temperature for one day (2.03 kg), but tenderness value was the most (0.92 kg) at cold temperature for one week compared to fresh meat (3.41, 4.06, and 3.66 kg). Lightness color (l), red color (a) and yellow color (b) for aged meat is usually increase compare to fresh meat, except for aged meat stored at room temperature for 12 hours was decrease significant. Water-holding capacity and cooking loss value of aged meat was not significant compared to fresh meat. Aging loss of aged meat stored at 4oC for one week (13.58%) was significant compared to aged meat stored at room temperature (2.42%) and 4oC for one day (2.90%).   Key words: Aging of carcass, room temperature, cold temperature, meat quality, aging loss
Development of fowl cholera vaccine: I. Protection of Pasteurella multocida local isolate vaccine against challenge of homologous and heterologous strains. ., Supar; Setiadi, Yudi; ., Djaenuri; Kurniasih, Nina; Poerwadhikarta, Bhakti; ., Sjafei
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 6, No 1 (2001)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (153.899 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i1.220

Abstract

Pasteurella multocida locally isolated from chicken and ducks (BCC 299, BCC 2331, DY1, DY2, 12TG, 15TG) andimported strains (BCC 1359, 1362; HEDDLESTON group 1 and 6 respectively) had been tested for its pathogenicity in theprevious study. The aims of this experiment were to study the preparation of local isolate pasteurellosis vaccines and to determine the protective effect of that vaccines in chicken against the highly pathogenic local isolates of P. multocida. Killed monovalent, bivalent and polyvalent pasteurellosis vaccines were prepared and each was adjunvanted with aluminum hydroxide gel at a final concentration of 1.5% and the cell concentration was equal to the No 10 of MacFarland tube standard. Each of the vaccine prepared was used to vaccinated on a group of six week old of layer chicken (8 per group). Each chicken was subcutaneously injected with 0.2 ml of vaccine, four weeks later each was boostered with similar vaccine with the same dose. Two weeks after giving the boostered vaccine each group of chicken were challenged, half with life bacterium of P. Multocida BCC 2331 and other with DY2. Any chick which survive after challenge was designated as protected by vaccination. Before vaccination 1 ml of blood was drawn from each of chicken and then two weeks apart up to challenge. Serum from each sample was separated and kept in deep freeze until tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Chicken vaccinated with killed whole cell P. multocida vaccines of monovalent (BCC 2331 or DY2) and bivalent (BCC 2331 + DY2) were protected against challenge with live bacterium of either BCC 2331 or DY2 at rate 67-100%. There was no protection in chicken vaccinated with either BCC 299, DY1, 12TG, 15TG, BCC 1359, or 1362 killed vaccine. Similarly no protection of chicken vaccinated with either DY1 + BCC299, 12TG + 15TG or BCC 1359 + BCC 1362 bivalent vaccines. The protection rate of the polyvalent local isolate vaccine was at average 50-75%. All vaccinated chicken showed the presence of antibody responses againsted the extract cell and whole cell antigens of either P. multocida BCC 2331 or DY2 local isolate as detected by ELISA. The antibody responses from vaccinated chicken against extra cellular antigens prepared from broth cultures of BCC 2331 and DY2 were detected only from vaccinated chicken with vaccine containing killed antigen of BCC 2331 and/or DY2 isolate. It is likely, the local isolate of P. multocida BCC 2331 and DY2 would be benefit for producing inactive fowl cholera vaccine use in Indonesia, but the protective antigen that enhances immune protection should be determined by means of immunoblotting techniques.   Key words: Pasteurella multocida, fowl cholera, vaccine, protection

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