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Ahmadi Riyanto
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medpub@litbang.deptan.go.id
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ahmadi_puslitbangnak@yahoo.com
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Kota bogor,
Jawa barat
INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 16 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 5, No 2 (2000)" : 16 Documents clear
Performances of composite genotype resulting from crossingbetween local sumatera and hair sheep under confinement condition ., Subandriyo; Setiadi, Bambang; Handiwirawan, Eko; Suparyanto, Agus
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 5, No 2 (2000)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (205.448 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v5i2.202

Abstract

Under semi-intensive conditions, the composite genotype (K) (25% Barbados Blackbelly; BB, 25% St. Croix; SC, 50% Sumatra Thin Tail; DETS) showed relatively have similar weaning weight as compared to other contemporary crossbred, therefore under intensive conditions (confined), they are expected to have better performances. The objective of the study are to find performances of the second generation composite genotype lambs and the first generation performances of the ewes, as well as several genetics parameters under intensive conditions, and compared to the Barbados Blackbelly Cross (BC) as contemporary crossbred. The growth of pre- and post-weaning of BB crossbred (BC) and the second generation of composite genotype (K-F2) are relatively the same. Growth curve using Von Bertalanffy model with the equation of Wt (t) = A*(1-B*e**(- K*t)), show that the equation for BC is Wt (t) = 26.8(1-0.92e**(-0.01t) and for K-F2 is Wt(t) = 26.1(1-0.92e**(-0.01t). This equation indicate that the growth of BC and K-F2 is not significantly different. The BC and K-F2 genotype reach maturity at the weight of 26.8 and 26.1 kg, respectively, and both with rate of reaching maturity of 0.01. Mating weight and weight at lambing of those two genotypes are around 29 - 30 kg dan 31 kg, respectively. The mean of litter size of BC and K-F1 are 1.52 and 1.48, respectively or around 1.5. The average litter size at weaning are 1.39 and 1.34, respectively for BC and K-F1. This means that pre-weaning mortality are around 5.37 and 9.76%, respectively for BC and K-F1. The lambing interval of BC and K-F1 are 211 and 223 days, or 0.58 and 0.61 year, respectively. Therefore the reproductive rate (RR) of the respective genotype are 1.39/0.58 = 2.39 and 1.34/0.61 = 2.19, respectively. The average of litter weight at weaning (LWW) of BC x BC, SC crossbred (HC) x BC and K-F1 x K-F1 are 11.62, 12.60 and 11.83 kg, respectively. Therefore based on the ewe genotype the LWW of BC and K-F1 are 11.74 and 11.83 kg, respectively. Flock productivity (FP) for those two genotypes per year are 20.24 and 19.39 kg, respectively for BC and K-F1. Dam productivity index (DPI) that calculated as /ewe weight for those two genotypes are 0.67 and 0.66, respectively for BC and K-F1. Meanwhile, the flock efficiency index (FEI) that calculated as FEI = FP/ewe weight0.75 for the respective genotypes are 1.57 and 1.54 for BC and K-F1. The estimates of repeatability of litter weight at weaning show relatively low value (0,092), therefore the estimate of MPPA (Most Probable Producing Ability) for predicting the future productivity is relatively the same. The estimate of MPPA for litter weight at weaning (LWW) for the respective genotype are 11.79 and 11.81 kg, respectively for BC and K-F1. Results of the study show that performances of composite genotypes (F) and the contemporary crossbred (BC) are relatively similar in the traits of growth, dam productivity and the estimate of MPPA.   Key words : Composite sheep, performance of production and reproduction, intensif condition
Effects of glycerol in tris extender on frozen semen quality of crossbred Etawah bucks Tambing, Surya Natal; Toelihere, Mozes R; Yusuf, Tuty L; Sutama, I ketut
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 5, No 2 (2000)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (171.879 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v5i2.203

Abstract

Bucks semen is easily damaged during freezing process, due to the formation of ice crystals. Consequently, semen quality decreases particularly the post-thaw sperm motility, viability, intack plasma membrane and intack acrosomal cap. The objectives of this research are to determine the optimum dose of glycerol in Tris extender in maintaining frozen semen quality of crossbred Etawah bucks. Four head of PE buck of 2 - 4 years old were used in this experiment. Doses of glycerol used were 5%, 6% and 7%. Semen was collected once a week using artificial vagina. Results of this experiment indicated that the mean percentage of pre-freezing motility, live sperm, sperm with intact plasma membrane and intact acrosomal cap in 5%, 6% and 7% glycerol were not significantly different (P>0.05). After freezing, the mean percentage of motility, live sperm, sperm with intact plasma membrane and intact acrosomal cap in 6% glycerol (52.60%, 65.03%, 45.63% and 47.54% respectively) were significantly higher (P<0.05) than in 5% (44.31%, 52.00%, 37.60% and 37.00% respectively) and in 7% glycerol (45.28%, 52.10%, 37.97% and 37.14% respectively). However, there were not significant differences in 5% and 7% glycerol for any parameter measured. It was concluded that supplementation of glycerol 6% in Tris extender effective to protect of sperm from various shock during the process of semen cryopreservation, so that it could maintain of frozen semen quality (sperm motility, viability, intack plasma membrane and intack acrosomal cap) that suitable used in AI program of crossbred Etawah bucks.   Key words : Glycerol, PE bucks, semen quality
Effect of micromineral and phenylpropionic acid on performances of coccus and rod-shaped cellulolytic bacteria degrading fibre of forage Thalib, Amlius; Haryanto, B; Kompiang, S; Mathius, I-W; Aini, A
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 5, No 2 (2000)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (168.718 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v5i2.204

Abstract

Performances of coccus and rod-shaped cellulolytic bacteria as inoculum for fermentation of fibrous substrate treated with growth or stimulator factors have been conducted by in vitro. The bacteria were firstly separated and purified based on their morphological shape and followed by identification of their gram type. The treatments as follow : control, Cu (1,0 ppm), Zn (6,0 ppm), Se (0,02 ppm), Fe (16 ppm), Co (0,02 ppm), Mn (4,0 ppm), Mo (0,002 ppm), and phenylpropionic acid (PPA) (30 ppm). These factors were added into fermentation media individually (F.P/S) and as mixture (Mix F.P/S). Substrates used were cellulose and rice straw. Measurements were bacterial digestion of drymatter (DMD), bacterial count, volatile fatty acids (VFA) and NH3-N contents. Gram test showed that inoculum cellulolytic cocci and rods are gram-positive and gram-negative consecutively. The results of treatments showed that Cu, Zn, Co, Mo and PPA improve digestibility of cellulose and rice straw substrates by cellulolytic cocci significantly (p<0.05), and beside Mn, these factors increased the total count of cellulolytic cocci in fermentation medium significantly (p<0.05). The growth or stimulator factors increasing digestibility values of the substrates by cellulolytic rods significantly (p<0.05) were Cu, Zn, Se, Fe, Co, Mn and Mo (except Mn for rice straw substrate). Only 4 elements of the growth and stimulator factors increasing the total count of cellulolytic rods during fermentation of cellulose and rice straw substrates significantly (p<0.05) that is Zn, Co, Mn and Mo. Digestibility of cellulose by cocci is higher than by rods (34.65% vs 29.87%), however, the digestibility of rice straw by both bacteria did not show difference. Digestibility of both cellulose and rice straw substrates was improved by cocci and rods combination and improved further when treated with Mix F.P/S. Parameters of fermentation media ecosystem measured (i.e. total count of bacteria, VFA and NH3-N) were generally changed to be better when treated with Mix F.P/S. It is concluded that performances of cocci and rods in digesting fibrous  substrate are different, and growth or stimulator factors improved the activities of both group of bacteria significantly.   Key words : Cellulolytic cocci, cellulolytic rods, growth and stimulator factors, bacterial digestion
Genetic diversity of native chicken based on analysis of D-Loop mtDNA marker Sartika, Tike; Duryadi, D; Mansjoer, S.S; Gunawan, B
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 5, No 2 (2000)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (536.415 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v5i2.205

Abstract

Production was carried out using control region/D-loop mtDNA marker. The base population of native chicken was selected from subpopulation at Cianjur, Jatiwangi, Depok, Bogor I, and Bogor 2. Samples from each population was 10 heads and 2 samples Green Jungle Fowl (Gallus various) from East Java as out Group samples. Two primers binding conserved tRNA Phenylalanine gene and tRNA Glutamine gene were DNA Heavy stranded HI255 (5-CATCTTGGCATCTTCAGTGCC-3) and DNA Light stranded Ll6750 (5-AGGACTACGGCTTGAAAAGC-3) was used to amplify D-Ioop mtDNA chicken. PCR-RFLP methods with 6 restriction enzymes 4 cutter such as, Alul (AG↓CT), Hpall (C↓CGG), Mbol (↓GATC), Rsal (GT↓AC), NlaIII (CATG↓) and HaeIII (GG↓CC) were used to detect polymorphism within and between subpopulation. Result of experiment show that mtDNA which was amplified by PCR was 1320 bp, consist of 1227 bp control region/D-loop, 45 bp tRNA Glutamine gene and 48 bp tRNA Phenylalananine gene. PCR product which were digested from 6 endonucleases enzyme show that native chicken within and between population was monomorphic and if its compare with Green Jungle Fowl was polymorphic.   Key words: Native chicken, genetic diversity, mtDNA
Utilization of palm oil sludge in poultry diet. 1. Dried palm oil sludge and its fermented product in broiler’s diet Sinurat, A.P; Purwadaria, T; Ketaren, P.P; Zainuddin, D; Kompiang, I.P
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 5, No 2 (2000)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (128.433 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v5i2.206

Abstract

Palm oil sludge a by product of palm oil industry is not commonly used in poultry feed due to some limiting factors such as low protein and amino acids content and high fiber content. These limiting factors were expected to be reduced by fermentation technology. Therefore an experiment was conducted to study the use of fermented (FLS) and non-fermented palm oil sludge (LS) for broiler chicken feed. Two hundred and ten day-old broiler chicks were used for this study. The birds were allocated into 35 cages with 6 birds in each cage. Each 5 group of birds were fed with one of 7 experimental diets. All diets were formulated with similar nutrient contents containing either LS or FLS at 3 different levels (5, 10 and 15%) and a control diet with no LS or FLS. The experimental diets were fed for 6 weeks and the performances were observed. Carcass yield, abdominal fat, weight of liver and gizzard were also measured at the end of the trial. The results showed that LS or FLS can be included in broiler’s diet, since the mortality, carcass yield, abdominal fat, liver and gizzard were not significantly affected. Best level inclusion of LS was 5%. Although inclusion of 10-15% LS did not affect growth and feed conversion significantly, the feed intake was significantly depressed. The best level inclusion of FLS was 10%, since higher level (15%) caused growth depression.   Key words: Palm oil sludge, fermentation, broilers
Selection of phytase-producing moulds Susana, I.W.R; Tangenjaya, B; Hastiono, S
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 5, No 2 (2000)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (146.39 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v5i2.207

Abstract

Organic phosphorous in the form of phytate salts are found in feed component originated from cereals which can not be digested by chicken unless after the addition of an enzyme, i.e. phytase. A research to investigate phytase-producing moulds had been carried out. A total of 60 isolates from various collection units and isolation from samples had been collected then screened in Czapek’s medium with Ca-phytate as the source of phosphorous. From mould growth measurements and clearing zones formation there were 4 mould isolates, i.e. Aspergillus ficuum NRRL 3135 and NRRL 320, Aspergillus niger M94/18/D2 (Balitvet isolate), and Aspergillus niger no. 58 (IPB isolate), which were further observed. Enzyme was produced from medium containing 8% of corn’s starch, 3% of glucose, 0.0005% of KCl and MgSO4.7H2O, 0.0002% of K2HPO4, and 0.00018% of FeSO4.7H2O. The enzyme activity, protein and biomass contents were observed at 16, 24, 32, 48 and 72 hours incubations for Aspergillus niger and at 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 days incubations for Aspergillus ficuum. The highest protein content was found at 5 days incubation for Aspergillus ficuum NRRL 3135 and NRRL 320, (165 and 169 μg/ml respectively), while for Aspergillus niger (Balitvet and IPB isolates) at 16 hours incubation (102 and 112 μg/ml respectively). Meanwhile, the biomass contents were decreased in accordance with the duration of incubations. The maximum enzyme productions were reached at 24 hours incubation for Aspergillus niger and at 4 days incubation for Aspergillus ficuum. The highest phytase activities were reached at 2.808 U/ml for Aspergillus ficuum NRRL 3135, followed by 1.520 U/ml for Aspergillus ficuum NRRL 320. Aspergillus niger produced enzyme quicker than the other moulds, with lower activity level and decreases quicker at the following hours.   Key words: Phytate, phytase, Aspergillus ficuum, Aspergillus niger
Study in ovo immunisation with flagellin and whole cell protein antigens of Campylobacter jejuni in chickens Noor, Susan Maphilindawati; Husband, Alan J
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 5, No 2 (2000)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (161.048 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v5i2.208

Abstract

In ovo immunisation of chickens with flagellin and whole cell protein antigens of Campylobacter jejuni was examined to determine Campylobacter infection. Four groups of embryonated chicken eggs (10 eggs per group) were immunised in ovo at day 17 of incubation and booster was given at 7 days post-hatch. Group I was immunised in ovo and oral booster with whole cell protein of C. jejuni, group II was immunised in ovo and oral booster with C. jejuni flagellin protein, group III was immunised in ovo and intraperitoneal booster with whole cell, and group IV was treated as control. The humoral immune responses were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the mucosal immune responses were examined by a direct fluorescent histology antibody technique. Immunised chickens of Group I, II, and III shown to have higher antibody titers than  those of control chickens (group IV). The titres of anti-campylobacter antibodies of all isotypes in serum, bile, and intestinal scrapping after challenge were not significantly different in all groups. In addition, when immunised chickens were orally challenged with a homologous strain of viable C. jejuni organism, the chickens remained infected throughout the experiment based on cloacal swabs and caecal contents. These findings indicated that although in ovo immunisation resulted in increasing of the mucosal and humoral immune responses in chickens, it is not strong enough to protect the Campylobacter colonisation in the intestinal tract.   Key words : In ovo immunisation, Campylobacter jejuni, whole cell, flagellar, chickens
Stunting or runting syndrome in broiler chickens and its pathological changes Wahyuwardani, S; Sani, Y; Parede, L; Syafriati, T; Poeloengan, M
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 5, No 2 (2000)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (131.386 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v5i2.209

Abstract

A disease with stunting or runting syndrome in broiler chickens was investigated in 13 districts of West Java and Central Java provinces. A total of 291 chickens samples both with clinically stunted or runted were collected from 37 poultry farms. Blood samples were collected randomly from chickens in poultry farms for packed cells volume analysis. Tissues of liver, spleen, thymus, proventriculus, ventriculus intestines, caecum, pancreas, bursa fabricious and heart were collected for histopathological examination. Field surveys showed that prevalence rate of stunting or runting syndrome was varied from one farm to others between 0,1% to 50%. Clinical signs were noted as ununiformity of body size in a flock of chicken, stunted and/or runted of body weight gain and protrude of wing feather. Pathologic changes were hyperemic thymus, athropic thymus and athropic pancreas. While microscopically included dilatation crypt of Lieberkuhn, inflammation of thymus, pancreatitis and enteritis variably among each locations. The PCV level did not show direct link to the affected stunting or runting syndrome.   Key words: Syndrome, stunting, runting, pathology anatomy, histopathology
Detection of immunosuppression caused by Trypanosoma evansi infection and malnutrition in experimental buffaloes with skin sensitisation tests Partoutomo, S
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 5, No 2 (2000)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (182.524 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v5i2.210

Abstract

The main impacts of T. evansi infection in cattle and buffaloes include weight losses, deaths, and reduction of productivity, morover immunosuppressive conditions as a result of this parasite infection are commonly found. Dinitrochlorobenzene skin contact sensitisation (DNCB), phytohaemagglutinin skin (PHA) and homologous passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (HPCA) tests have been used for diagnosis of immunosuppression in man. The purposes of these experiments were to detect immunosuppression caused by T. evansi infection and malnutrition in normal and malnutrition buffaloes. Sixteen male and female buffaloes, 12-18 months of ages were divided into 4 groups, Group1 fed with high grade of ration and infected with T. evansi, Group2 fed with high grade of ration not infected, Group3 fed with low grade of ration and infected with T. evansi, and Group4 fed with low grade of ration and not infected. Buffaloes fed with high grade of ration are assumed as normal animals, while buffaloes fed with low grade of ration are assumed as malnutrion animals. These buffaloes were kept in fly proof fences in the Research Institute for Veterinary Science, Bogor. The experimental results indicated that normal buffaloes produced significantly (P<0,05) wider and thicker inflammation areas in DNCB and PHA test respectively than malnutrition and T. Evansi infected buffaloes one week after T. evansi infection. The widest skin reaction of 33 + 4.7 mm2 in DCCB and the thickest skin reaction of 45 + 1,0 in PHA test was obtained in 24 hours after DNCB challenge or PHA injection. Thereafter both DNCB and PHA test showed the reduction of the skin reactions, however they were still positive in 48 hours and becoming negative in 72 hours later. PHA test was able to differenciate the intensity of either the combined effects of malnutrition and T. evansi infection, T. evansi infection, or malnutrition alone. HPCA test showed inconsistent results.   Keys words : Trypanosoma evansi, immunosuppression, DNCB, PHA, HPCA
Effect of micromineral and phenylpropionic acid on performances of coccus and rod-shaped cellulolytic bacteria degrading fibre of forage Thalib, Amlius; Haryanto, B; Kompiang, S; Mathius, I-W; Aini, A
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 5, No 2 (2000): JUNE 2000
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (168.718 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v5i2.204

Abstract

Performances of coccus and rod-shaped cellulolytic bacteria as inoculum for fermentation of fibrous substrate treated with growth or stimulator factors have been conducted by in vitro. The bacteria were firstly separated and purified based on their morphological shape and followed by identification of their gram type. The treatments as follow : control, Cu (1,0 ppm), Zn (6,0 ppm), Se (0,02 ppm), Fe (16 ppm), Co (0,02 ppm), Mn (4,0 ppm), Mo (0,002 ppm), and phenylpropionic acid (PPA) (30 ppm). These factors were added into fermentation media individually (F.P/S) and as mixture (Mix F.P/S). Substrates used were cellulose and rice straw. Measurements were bacterial digestion of drymatter (DMD), bacterial count, volatile fatty acids (VFA) and NH3-N contents. Gram test showed that inoculum cellulolytic cocci and rods are gram-positive and gram-negative consecutively. The results of treatments showed that Cu, Zn, Co, Mo and PPA improve digestibility of cellulose and rice straw substrates by cellulolytic cocci significantly (p<0.05), and beside Mn, these factors increased the total count of cellulolytic cocci in fermentation medium significantly (p<0.05). The growth or stimulator factors increasing digestibility values of the substrates by cellulolytic rods significantly (p<0.05) were Cu, Zn, Se, Fe, Co, Mn and Mo (except Mn for rice straw substrate). Only 4 elements of the growth and stimulator factors increasing the total count of cellulolytic rods during fermentation of cellulose and rice straw substrates significantly (p<0.05) that is Zn, Co, Mn and Mo. Digestibility of cellulose by cocci is higher than by rods (34.65% vs 29.87%), however, the digestibility of rice straw by both bacteria did not show difference. Digestibility of both cellulose and rice straw substrates was improved by cocci and rods combination and improved further when treated with Mix F.P/S. Parameters of fermentation media ecosystem measured (i.e. total count of bacteria, VFA and NH3-N) were generally changed to be better when treated with Mix F.P/S. It is concluded that performances of cocci and rods in digesting fibrous  substrate are different, and growth or stimulator factors improved the activities of both group of bacteria significantly.   Key words : Cellulolytic cocci, cellulolytic rods, growth and stimulator factors, bacterial digestion

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