cover
Contact Name
Ahmadi Riyanto
Contact Email
medpub@litbang.deptan.go.id
Phone
-
Journal Mail Official
ahmadi_puslitbangnak@yahoo.com
Editorial Address
-
Location
Kota bogor,
Jawa barat
INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 17 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 4, No 4 (1999)" : 17 Documents clear
The influence of follicle numbers per ovary on the quality of oocytes and the day length of forming blastocyte s by in vitro fertilization Sumantri, Cece; Anggraeni, Anneke
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 4, No 4 (1999)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (154.62 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i4.162

Abstract

The aim of this research is to know the influence of the number of follicles produced per ovary on the quality of oocytes and the day length of developing blastocytes by in vitro fertilization (IVF) at 7-,8-, and 9-days. Material of the research is ovary of Fries Holland dairy cattle gathered from slaughterhouse. A number of 138 ovaries are grouped into four based on the number of follicles per ovary, including group I (≤5 follicles), group II (6-10 follicles), group III (11-20 follicles), and group IV (≥20 follicles). The result showed that the number of follicles per ovary are not significantly (P>0.05) influencing both on oocyte quality and the days length of forming blastocytes at 7-, 8-, and 9-days. Number of oocytes for grade A-B (percentage of the number of oocytes IVF per the number of oocytes obtained per ovary) for group I - IV consecutively is 83.5%, 91.3%, 97.1%, and 91.2%. The number of developing blastocytes (percentage the number of blastocytes per the number of oocytes) for group I - IV at 7-days consecutively is 5.19%, 5.56%, 5.45%, and 6.03%; at 8-days is 15.58%, 12.94 %, 13.64%, and 11.64%; at 9-days is 1818%, 8.96%, 8.18%, and 10.35%.   Key words: Oocytes, IVF, blastocyte
Optimization of dairy based farming agricultural in critical land area of Yogyakarta Special Territory Masbula, Elan
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 4, No 4 (1999)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (216.307 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i4.163

Abstract

A study has been done to provide a conceptual basis for the development of agricultural system in critical land area in Yogyakarta Special Teritory as the smallest production unit to (1) determine optimum dairy farming based agriculture for the area and income maximization on either farmer own inputs or with CAFlTAL aid provided by a funding party, (2) to develop a model for developing farming system based on dairy farming in critical land area in Yogyakarta Special Teritory.Methods being used multistage problem solving approach to the problem encountered in farming system as practiced in Glagaharjo Village, Sub District of Cangkringan, Sleman with Rapid Rural Appraisal (RRA) and Agro-ecosystem Analysis as diagnostic activities. Farm record keeping and survey to fourty respondents purposively selected were then conducted. Using Linear Programming (LPM), a normative solution, under the imposed constraints for each activity, was obtained to see development effectivity of dairy based farming agricultural system. The result indicated that land resources had not managed optimally. Out of an average possession of 1,5 ha dry land, only 0,6 ha was cultivated, leading to relativelly low yield and income. Optimum dairy farming agriculture migh be an option to develop the area. Dairy farm Cooperative Agency (Model of Scenario I) can play important role to improve farmer income. With an average of 1,5 ha dry land and an average of 3 Animal Unit raised would optimized the resources allocation and income of Rp.20,385,340 for a period of eight years. The income rnigh be further increased to Rp.36,176,070 for similar production period with soft loan provided by ventura fund (Model of Scenario ll) to optimize land resources and family labor force use and a farmer was able to raised an average of 4 Animal Unit. If as being planned - such as scheme is adopted by 1,400 farmer, 230 worker will be employed in the first years. Employement need is increasing with time and after eight year it may reach 1154 workers/year. It can then be concluded that dairy based farming agriculture may improved economic endurance of farmer in critical land area, and directed as well toward land conservation program.   Key words: Optimization, farming system, dairy based farming
In-Vivo Digestibility of Rice Straw Silage Added With Buffalo Rumen Microbes In Ongole Cross Breed Bestari, John; Thalib, Amlius; Hamid, H; Suherman, D
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 4, No 4 (1999)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i4.164

Abstract

An experiment was cunducted to investigate the effect of rice straw silage added with buffalo rumen microbes on the in-vivo nutrient digestibility in Ongole cross breed. Twelve male young cattle (222 + 14 kg) were distributed into 3 groups, with 4 animals in each group. The dietary treatments were : Elephant grass (R1) fresh rice straw (R2) and rice straw silage added with buffalo rumen microbes (R3). Grass and concentrate were given at 2.25% of live weight. The experiment was conducted for 15 weeks in Ciawi using total collection and arranged in a Completely Randomized Design. The results showed that digestible DM and OM intakes of R3 was 6882 and 5974 g/head/day which was not significantly different from R1 (6905 and 6188 g/head/day) but significantly different from R2 (6654 and 5588 g/head/day). The digestible protein intake of R3 was 905 g which was higher than R2 (827 g)(P < 0.05). Intake of digestible protein of R1 (951 g/head/day) was 46 g higher than R1 (P > 0.05) and 124 g higher than R2 (P < 0,05). DM and OM digestibilities of R3 (i.e. 68.16% and 78.02%) were significantly higher than R2 (61.79% and 71.58%) but similar to R1 (66.34% and 76.37%). Digestible neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and fat intake were different among each treatment. In conclusion, rice straw silage added with buffalo rumen microbes has a similar nutritive value as elephant grass when fed to Ongole crossbreed cattle.   Key words : Rice straw silage, microbe, digestibility
In-Vivo Digestibility of Rice Straw Silage Added With Buffalo Rumen Microbes In Ongole Cross Breed Bestari, John; Thalib, Amlius; Hamid, H; Suherman, D
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 4, No 4 (1999)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (137.446 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i4.165

Abstract

An experiment was cunducted to investigate the effect of rice straw silage added with buffalo rumen microbes on the in-vivo nutrient digestibility in Ongole cross breed. Twelve male young cattle (222 + 14 kg) were distributed into 3 groups, with 4 animals in each group. The dietary treatments were : Elephant grass (R1) fresh rice straw (R2) and rice straw silage added with buffalo rumen microbes (R3). Grass and concentrate were given at 2.25% of live weight. The experiment was conducted for 15 weeks in Ciawi using total collection and arranged in a Completely Randomized Design. The results showed that digestible DM and OM intakes of R3 was 6882 and 5974 g/head/day which was not significantly different from R1 (6905 and 6188 g/head/day) but significantly different from R2 (6654 and 5588 g/head/day). The digestible protein intake of R3 was 905 g which was higher than R2 (827 g)(P < 0.05). Intake of digestible protein of R1 (951 g/head/day) was 46 g higher than R1 (P > 0.05) and 124 g higher than R2 (P < 0,05). DM and OM digestibilities of R3 (i.e. 68.16% and 78.02%) were significantly higher than R2 (61.79% and 71.58%) but similar to R1 (66.34% and 76.37%). Digestible neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and fat intake were different among each treatment. In conclusion, rice straw silage added with buffalo rumen microbes has a similar nutritive value as elephant grass when fed to Ongole crossbreed cattle.   Key words : Rice straw silage, microbe, digestibility
The effect of superovulation prior to mating on fetal growth in Iambs from Javanese thin-tail ewes Manalu, W
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 4, No 4 (1999)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (184.867 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i4.166

Abstract

Twenty-nine fetuses (11 fetuses from 9 non-superovulated ewes and 18 fetuses from 8 superovulated ewes) were used to study the effect of superovulation of ewes prior to mating on fetal weight, fetal length, the length of the body and limbs, chest circumference, weights of the body, head, neck, limb, and viscera. Superovulated ewes, though with a higher litter size, had a greater fetal growth as was indicated by the greater fetal weight and length, the length and weight of the body and limb on day 49 of pregnancy. On day 105 of pregnancy, superovulated ewes with multiple fetuses (≥3) had similar fetal growth than nonsuperovulated ewes with single and twin fetuses. However, superovulated ewes with a single fetus had greater fetal growth as was shown by the greater fetal weight and length, the length of the body and limbs, chest circumference, and weight of the body, limb, and viscera when compared to those non-superovulated ewes with a single or twin fetuses. The results of the experiment suggested that superovulation of ewes prior to mating could be used to improve fetal prenatal growth during pregnancy   Key words: Superovulation, fetal growth, pregnancy, sheep
Forage integration on farming systems in the district of Bayongbong, Garut ., Sajimin; Prawiradiputra, Bambang R; Panjaitan, M
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 4, No 4 (1999)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (138.072 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i4.167

Abstract

A study on forage integration on farming system was studied at Bayongbong of Garut District, West Java from April 1996 to April 1997. The objective of this study was to increase the availability of food and forage which are cultivated on the same land using alley cropping system. Elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum) and gliricidia (Gliricidia sepium) Were planted on thesame area using randomized block design (RBD) with 5 treatments and 3 replications. Elephant grass and gliricidia were planted as live fence. The experimental plot which were cultivated with food crops, giving the following treatment: A. Elephant grass were planted in row with spacing of 0.5 m. B. Both elephant grass and gliricidia were planted in row with spacing of 0.5 In. C.  Gliricidia alone were planted in row with spacing of 0.5 m. D. Experimental plot were planted with elephant grass without any life fencing. E. Experimental plot were planted with food crops as a control. Based on planting pattern com were planted on the experimental plot followed by cabbage. Cutting interval for elephant grass was 42 days while gliricidia was 60 days. Fresh and dry weight of elephant grass, gliricidia, corn and cabbage production were recorded. The results showed that there was no significant different on corn and cabbage production between treatment, while elephant grass production was significantly different (P < 0.05) among the treatments. The highest additional production of corn (1.8 kg/m2), and cabbage waste (2.5 kg/2m ) were found in the treatment. The highest elephant grass production was found in treatment A (5.1 kg/m2) followed by treatment D (4.9 kg/m2) and treatment B (4.1 kg/m2). The highest gliricidia forage production was found in the treatment B (0.6 kg/m2). It was concluded that the integration of forage and crops using alley cropping system on farm system was able to overcome the shortage of forage availability for animal production.   Key words: Alley croping, farming system, forage
Nutritive value of palm oil sludge fermented with Aspergillus niger after therma1 drying process Purwadaria, T; Sinurat, A.P; ., Supriyati; Hamid, H; Bintang, I.A.K
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 4, No 4 (1999)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (160.3 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i4.168

Abstract

Solid substrate fermentation by Aspergillus niger has been carried out to improve the nutritive value of palm oil sludge (POS). POS was fermented aerobically for four days in a fermentor chambers (28°C, RH 80%), with 60% moisture content Some of the product was further incubated anaerobically for 2 days at 28°C. Both products from aerobic and anaerobic fermentation processes were dried by various methods, i.e. sunlight, oven at 60°C, oven with blower at 40°C, at the moisture content less than 11%. Results of the drying methods were also compared with the fresh fermented product. Statistic analysis using factorial design (2 x 4) showed that there was no interaction between kind of fermentation processes (aerobic and anaerobic) and drying methods (fresh, sunlight, oven 60°C, and blower 40°C) for almost all parameters except total a-amino acid content Significant results (p<0.05) were obtained on the drying methods for parameters of crude protein, true protein, in vitro dry matter and protein digestibilities, and mannanase and cellulase activities. There were no significant results between treatments in the crude fiber analysis and soluble nitrogen content Significant results also did not occur between treatment of aerob and anaerob fermentation processes for almost all parameters except for dry matter digestibilities. Results from true protein and in vitro digestibilities show that the fresh fermented product has the best nutritive value, while product dried by sunlight was best among other drying processes. Results from in vivo of protein and energy digestibilities show that there were better metabolizable energy and protein for product with aerobic process and dried with oven and blower treatments, while sunlight drying was best for product processed in anaerobic condition. Although fresh fermented product gave better result from in vitro digestibilities and enzyme activity analyses, for some reasons (easy handling and preservation) sunlight drying gave best results for products processed under anaerobic condition, especially when sunlight drying is cheap.   Key words: Palm oil sludge, fermentation product, Aspergillus niger, thermal drying
Studies on the transmission of malignant catarrhal fever in experimental animals: A serial infection of cattle and buffalo by means of whole blood inoculation Wiyono, Agus; Damayanti, Rini
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 4, No 4 (1999)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (372.009 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i4.169

Abstract

Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a fatal disease especially affecting cattle and buffaloes. A study on the serial blood transmission of MCF was conducted by injecting whole blood of MCF animals into 9 experimental animals. Diagnosis of MCF was based on the clinico-pathological fmdings and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test. The disease has successfully, been achieved in six animals of three Bali cattle and three buffaloes but not in a Bali-cross breed and two Bos indicus (Ongole) cattle. Wide range of clinical signs and gross-pathological features were observed. The study showed the degree of susceptibility of experimental animals: Bali cattle and buffalo were highly susceptible (3 out of 3 affected with MCF), Bali-cross breed and Bos indicus (Ongole) cattle seemed not susceptible to whole blood experimental transmission. It shows that when Bali cattle acted as inoculum donor, buffalo tended to be clinically more severe than Bali cattle. On the other hand, when buffalo acted as inoculum donor, Bali cattle suffered from MCF more severe than buffalo. The diagnosis of MCF by histopathological examination and the PCR test bad positive correlation (100%) in the first experiment, while in the second experiment the PCR test tends to be more sensitive. Based on the restriction endonuclease (RE) test, the MCF causal agent in this study appeared to be genetically similar in each case. It is concluded that the serial experimental transmission of MCF by means of whole blood inoculation has been successfully achieved in Bali cattle and buffalo but not in Bali-cross breed and Ongole cattle, and there is a positive correlation between the PCR test and histopathological examination with the PCR test tends to be more sensitive.   Key words: MCF, serial transmission, blood, cattle, buffalo, Indonesia
The phenotypic detection of surface antigen of B lymphocytes, MHC I and MHC II by immunohistochemical techniques in the lymph nodes of Bali cattle infected with malignant catarrhal fever Damayanti, Rini
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 4, No 4 (1999)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (180.368 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i4.170

Abstract

A study on the phenotypic detection of surface antigen of B lymphocytes, MHC I and MHC II in lymph nodes of Bali cattle affected by malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) was conducted by immunohistochemical techniques using avidin-biotin complex peroxidase methods. A number of monoclonal antibodies against surface antigen of B lymphocytes, MHC I and MHC II were used. The results showed that the surface antigens were all detected either in the MCF or in the non-MCF Bali cattle lymph nodes. MHC I were shown predominantly occupied in the lymph nodes of infected cattle. The surface antigen of B cells and MHC II were less found in the infected ones. This indicates that in the immunopathological processes in MCF infected cattle, B cells were not actively involved in producing antibodies, whereas MHC I may contribute the high degree of susceptibility of Bali cattle to MCF.   Key words : MCF, B cells, MHC I, MHC II, Bali cattle, immunohistochemical technique
The immune responses on cattle and buffaloes infected with Fasciola gigantica before and after treatment Estuningsih, S.E; Widjajanti, S; ., Suhardono
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 4, No 4 (1999)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (179.779 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i4.171

Abstract

The immune responses of cattle and buffaloes against the infection of liver flukes Fasciola gigantica were observed by ELISA. Six cattle and 6 buffaloes were infected orally with 700 metacercariae of F. gigantica, 2 cattle and 2 buffaloes were remained uninfected as control animals. Serum blood samples were collected weekly and the antibody levels were monitored before and after treatment. The results showed that the antibody level on cattle increased after 2 weeks post-infection, then gradually increased until reaching the peak at II weeks after infection. In the contrary, the antibody level on buffaloes appeared slower than on cattle, it increased after 13 weeks of infection and reach the peak at 25 weeks after infection. When the antibodylevels reach the peak, both groups of infected animals were treated with triclabendazole. After treatment, the antibody level oncattle was immediately decreased at one week of treatment, and gradually decreased up to the lowest antibody level at 7 weeks after treatment. The response of the treatment on buffaloes showed almost similar pattern, the antibody level decreased after one week of treatment, then remained constant for about 4 weeks, and reach the lowest antibody level at 7 weeks after treatment. It is concluded that the immune responses against the infection of F. gigantica in cattle and buffaloes are different, but the response of the treatment with triclabendazole are similar.   Key words: Fasciola gigantica, cattle, buffaloes, antibody levels, triclabendazole

Page 1 of 2 | Total Record : 17


Filter by Year

1999 1999


Filter By Issues
All Issue Vol 24, No 3 (2019): SEPTEMBER 2019 Vol 24, No 2 (2019): JUNE 2019 Vol 24, No 2 (2019): JUNE 2019 Vol 24, No 1 (2019): MARCH 2019 Vol 23, No 4 (2018): DECEMBER 2018 Vol 23, No 3 (2018): SEPTEMBER 2018 Vol 23, No 2 (2018): JUNE 2018 Vol 23, No 1 (2018): MARCH 2018 Vol 22, No 4 (2017): DECEMBER 2017 Vol 22, No 3 (2017): SEPTEMBER 2017 Vol 22, No 2 (2017): JUNE 2017 Vol 22, No 1 (2017): MARCH 2017 Vol 21, No 4 (2016): DECEMBER 2016 Vol 21, No 3 (2016): SEPTEMBER 2016 Vol 21, No 2 (2016): JUNE 2016 Vol 21, No 1 (2016): MARCH 2016 Vol 20, No 4 (2015): DECEMBER 2015 Vol 20, No 3 (2015): SEPTEMBER 2015 Vol 20, No 2 (2015): JUNE 2015 Vol 20, No 1 (2015): MARCH 2015 Vol 20, No 4 (2015): DECEMBER 2015 Vol 20, No 3 (2015): SEPTEMBER 2015 Vol 20, No 2 (2015): JUNE 2015 Vol 20, No 1 (2015): MARCH 2015 Vol 20, No 1 (2015) Vol 19, No 3 (2014): SEPTEMBER 2014 Vol 19, No 2 (2014): JUNE 2014 Vol 19, No 4 (2014): DECEMBER 2014 Vol 19, No 4 (2014) Vol 19, No 3 (2014): SEPTEMBER 2014 Vol 19, No 3 (2014) Vol 19, No 2 (2014): JUNE 2014 Vol 19, No 2 (2014) Vol 19, No 1 (2014): MARCH 2014 Vol 19, No 1 (2014) Vol 18, No 4 (2013): DECEMBER 2013 Vol 18, No 4 (2013) Vol 18, No 3 (2013): SEPTEMBER 2013 Vol 18, No 3 (2013) Vol 18, No 2 (2013): JUNE 2013 Vol 18, No 2 (2013) Vol 18, No 1 (2013): MARCH 2013 Vol 18, No 1 (2013) Vol 17, No 4 (2012): DECEMBER 2012 Vol 17, No 4 (2012) Vol 17, No 3 (2012): SEPTEMBER 2012 Vol 17, No 3 (2012) Vol 17, No 2 (2012): JUNE 2012 Vol 17, No 2 (2012) Vol 17, No 1 (2012): MARCH 2012 Vol 17, No 1 (2012) Vol 16, No 4 (2011): DECEMBER 2011 Vol 16, No 4 (2011) Vol 16, No 3 (2011): SEPTEMBER 2011 Vol 16, No 3 (2011) Vol 16, No 2 (2011): JUNE 2011 Vol 16, No 2 (2011) Vol 16, No 1 (2011): MARCH 2011 Vol 16, No 1 (2011) Vol 15, No 4 (2010): DECEMBER 2010 Vol 15, No 4 (2010) Vol 15, No 3 (2010): SEPTEMBER 2010 Vol 15, No 3 (2010) Vol 15, No 2 (2010): JUNE 2010 Vol 15, No 2 (2010) Vol 15, No 1 (2010): MARCH 2010 Vol 15, No 1 (2010) Vol 14, No 4 (2009): DECEMBER 2009 Vol 14, No 4 (2009) Vol 14, No 3 (2009): SEPTEMBER 2009 Vol 14, No 3 (2009) Vol 14, No 2 (2009): JUNE 2009 Vol 14, No 2 (2009) Vol 14, No 1 (2009): MARCH 2009 Vol 14, No 1 (2009) Vol 13, No 4 (2008): DECEMBER 2008 Vol 13, No 4 (2008) Vol 13, No 3 (2008): SEPTEMBER 2008 Vol 13, No 3 (2008) Vol 13, No 2 (2008): JUNE 2008 Vol 13, No 2 (2008) Vol 13, No 1 (2008): MARCH 2008 Vol 13, No 1 (2008) Vol 12, No 4 (2007): DECEMBER 2007 Vol 12, No 4 (2007) Vol 12, No 3 (2007): SEPTEMBER 2007 Vol 12, No 3 (2007) Vol 12, No 2 (2007): JUNE 2007 Vol 12, No 2 (2007) Vol 12, No 1 (2007): MARCH 2007 Vol 12, No 1 (2007) Vol 11, No 4 (2006): DECEMBER 2006 Vol 11, No 4 (2006) Vol 11, No 3 (2006): SEPTEMBER 2006 Vol 11, No 3 (2006) Vol 11, No 2 (2006): JUNE 2006 Vol 11, No 2 (2006) Vol 11, No 1 (2006) Vol 10, No 4 (2005): DECEMBER 2005 Vol 10, No 4 (2005): DECEMBER 2005 Vol 10, No 4 (2005) Vol 10, No 3 (2005): SEPTEMBER 2005 Vol 10, No 3 (2005) Vol 10, No 2 (2005): JUNE 2005 Vol 10, No 2 (2005) Vol 10, No 1 (2005): MARCH 2005 Vol 10, No 1 (2005) Vol 9, No 4 (2004): DECEMBER 2004 Vol 9, No 4 (2004) Vol 9, No 3 (2004): SEPTEMBER 2004 Vol 9, No 3 (2004) Vol 9, No 2 (2004): JUNE 2004 Vol 9, No 2 (2004) Vol 9, No 1 (2004): MARCH 2004 Vol 9, No 1 (2004) Vol 8, No 4 (2003): DECEMBER 2003 Vol 8, No 4 (2003) Vol 8, No 3 (2003): SEPTEMBER 2003 Vol 8, No 3 (2003) Vol 8, No 2 (2003): JUNE 2003 Vol 8, No 2 (2003) Vol 8, No 1 (2003): MARCH 2003 Vol 8, No 1 (2003) Vol 7, No 4 (2002): DECEMBER 2002 Vol 7, No 4 (2002) Vol 7, No 3 (2002): SEPTEMBER 2002 Vol 7, No 3 (2002) Vol 7, No 2 (2002): JUNE 2002 Vol 7, No 2 (2002) Vol 7, No 1 (2002): MARCH 2002 Vol 7, No 1 (2002) Vol 6, No 4 (2001): DECEMBER 2001 Vol 6, No 2 (2001): JUNE 2001 Vol 6, No 1 (2001): MARCH 2001 Vol 6, No 4 (2001): DECEMBER 2001 Vol 6, No 4 (2001) Vol 6, No 3 (2001): SEPTEMBER 2001 Vol 6, No 3 (2001) Vol 6, No 2 (2001): JUNE 2001 Vol 6, No 2 (2001) Vol 6, No 1 (2001): MARCH 2001 Vol 6, No 1 (2001) Vol 5, No 4 (2000): DECEMBER 2000 Vol 5, No 3 (2000): SEPTEMBER 2000 Vol 5, No 2 (2000): JUNE 2000 Vol 5, No 1 (2000): MARCH 2000 Vol 5, No 4 (2000): DECEMBER 2000 Vol 5, No 4 (2000) Vol 5, No 3 (2000): SEPTEMBER 2000 Vol 5, No 3 (2000) Vol 5, No 2 (2000): JUNE 2000 Vol 5, No 2 (2000) Vol 5, No 1 (2000): MARCH 2000 Vol 5, No 1 (2000) Vol 4, No 4 (1999): DECEMBER 1999 Vol 4, No 3 (1999): SEPTEMBER 1999 Vol 4, No 2 (1999): JUNE 1999 Vol 4, No 1 (1999): MARCH 1999 Vol 4, No 4 (1999): DECEMBER 1999 Vol 4, No 4 (1999) Vol 4, No 3 (1999): SEPTEMBER 1999 Vol 4, No 3 (1999) Vol 4, No 2 (1999): JUNE 1999 Vol 4, No 2 (1999) Vol 4, No 1 (1999): MARCH 1999 Vol 4, No 1 (1999) Vol 3, No 4 (1998) Vol 3, No 3 (1998) Vol 3, No 2 (1998) Vol 3, No 1 (1998) Vol 2, No 4 (1998) Vol 3, No 4 (1998) Vol 3, No 3 (1998) Vol 3, No 2 (1998) Vol 3, No 1 (1998) Vol 2, No 4 (1998) Vol 2, No 3 (1997) Vol 2, No 3 (1997) Vol 2, No 2 (1996) Vol 2, No 1 (1996) Vol 2, No 2 (1996) Vol 2, No 1 (1996) Vol 1, No 3 (1995) Vol 1, No 2 (1995) Vol 1, No 1 (1995) Vol 1, No 3 (1995) Vol 1, No 2 (1995) Vol 1, No 1 (1995) More Issue