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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 7 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 4, No 3 (1999): SEPTEMBER 1999" : 7 Documents clear
kernel meal and its fermented product for growing ducks Bintang, I.A.K; Sinurat, A.P; Murtisari, T; Pasaribu, T; Purwadaria, T; Haryati, T
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 4, No 3 (1999): SEPTEMBER 1999
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i3.156

Abstract

A series of experiment was carried out to evaluate the use of palm kernel meal and its fermented product in the ration of growing ducks. Treatments were arranged in a 2x3 factorial experiment, i.e. the combination between two processes (unfermented and fermented palm kernel meal) and three levels of ingredients in the diet (5, 10 and 15%). Four replicates were applied for each treatment, with 8 ducklings in each replicate. A control diet with no palm kernel meal was also formulated. All diets were formulated to have a similar protein and ME contents. Results of the experiment showed that fermentation process increased the nutrient composition (crude protein, true protein, phosphorus, and the metabolizable energy) and reduced its fibre and fat content. The feeding trial showed that neither the fermentation process, levels of ingredients nor the interactions of the two factors affected final body weight, feed consumption, feed conversion, carcass percentage and abdominal fat of the ducklings significantly. It is concluded that fermentation process improved the nutritional value of palm kernel meal and the inclusion of palm kernel meal (unfermented and fermented), up to 15% in the diet of ducks did not negatively affect the growthperformance and the carcass yield.   Key words : Ducks, palm kernel meal, fermentation
Effects of zinc and calcium minerals intake on cadmium accumulation in the liver of broiler chicken Rachmawati, Sri; ., Darmono; Arifin, Zainal
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 4, No 3 (1999): SEPTEMBER 1999
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (143.381 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i3.161

Abstract

Cadmium is a heavy metal which can accumulate in animal tissues, may have an effect the growth of chicken, causes a residual problems and is danger for human consumption. Study on evaluating the effect of mineral zinc (Zn) and calcium (Ca) intake on cadmium (Cd ) accumulation in the liver of broilers and their growth was carried out. One hundred and eighty of day old chicks (DOC) were divided into 6 groups, group I was used as control, group II, III, IV, V and VI were given feed containing of 5 ppm Cd, 5 ppm Cd and 10 ppm Zn, 5 ppm Cd and 15 ppm Zn, 5 ppm Cd and 10 ppm Ca, 5 ppm Cd and 15 ppm Ca respectively in their feed. Cd, Zn and Ca were added as CdCl2, ZnCl2 and CaCl2. During the experiment, at week -0, -1,-2,-3 and -4, five chickens from each group were weighed and then they were slaughtered and livers were collected. The liver samples were analyzed for Cd content by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. The result indicated that Cd exposed to chickens caused the accumulation of that Cd in their liver. The addition of 15 ppm Zn in feed reduced the accumulation of Cd in liver significantly (P<0.05). However the addition of Ca in chicken feed gave greater effect in reducing the Cd accumulation in liver compared to that of Zn supplementation. 10 ppm Ca and 15 ppm Ca in chicken feed caused the accumulation of Cd in liver chicken significantly decreased (P<0.05). Ca supplementation also caused of increasing body weight of chickens. The body weight of five weeks old chickens given 15 ppm Ca in their feed as in average of 1,820 grams is higher than that of chickens in control group, which was 1,761 grams. Whereas the body weight of chickens in group IV, which was given with 15 ppm Zn in their diet was in average of 1,745 grams. It was concluded that Zn and Ca can reduce the accumulation of Cd in broiler chicken liver.   Key words : Zinc, calcium, accumulation, cadmium
Lamb production of prolific sheep Inounu, Ismeth; Tiesnamurti, Bess; ., Subandriyo; Martojo, Harimurti
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 4, No 3 (1999): SEPTEMBER 1999
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (191.625 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i3.152

Abstract

The research was aimed to study factors that affected litter size (JAS), lamb survival (DHA) and litter weight at birth (BL) and at weaning (BS) on prolific ewes. Production records during the year of 1981-1993 were used in this study (1,437 records). Ewe genotypes (G), management levels (M), ewe parity (P) were the fixed effect and ewe gestation gain (PKB) was a covariable that included in the model. Analysis of variance for unbalanced data with general linear model procedure were used. Mean JAS was 1.77. Sources of variation that affected JAS were G, M, P-M interaction, and PKB. One copy of FecF gene increased the number of lambs born by 0.8. Changing toward a better management levels was followed by an increase of JAS. An increased of one kilogram PKB was also followed by an increase of 0.04 litter size born. The mean of BL was 3.43 kg and the sources of variation that affected BL were G, M and P-M interaction. At all management levels, primipara ewes had lower litter size at birth and litter birth weight than the pluripara ewes. Mean DHA found was 73.93%, it was affected by G-M interaction, P and PKB. First parity ewes has 11% lower of DHA than second parity ewes. An increase of 1 kg PKB was followed by an increase of 2.3% of DHA. Sources of variation that affected BS were G-M interaction, P and PKB. Mean BS in this study was 13.12 kg.   Key words : Prolific sheep, lamb production
Improvement of native grassland by legumes introduction and tillage techniques Bahar, Syamsu; Hardjosoewignjo, S; Kismono, I; Haridjaja, O
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 4, No 3 (1999): SEPTEMBER 1999
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (322.472 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i3.157

Abstract

Improvement of native grassland by legumes introduction and tillage techniques Improvement of native grassland by legumes introduction and tillage techniques A factorial design using three species of legumes (Siratro, Centro and Stylo) and three different of tillage techniques (no-tillage, minimum tillage and total tillage) was applied in this experiment. The results showed that there was no interaction between species and tillage techniques. There was significant reductions on bulk density from 1.23±0.03 g/cm3 (no-tillage) to 1.07±0.02 g/cm3 (minimum tillage) and 1.05±0.03 g/cm3 (total tillage). Also reductions on penetration resistance from 17.47±3.84 kg/cm2 (no-tillage) to 3.31±0.43 kg/cm2 (minimum tillage) and 3.19±0.45 kg/cm2 (total tillage). Otherwise significant increasing on aeration porosity from 12.80±0.80% vol. (no-tillage) to 21.70±0.95% vol. (minimum tillage) and 20.70±0.35% vol. (total tillage). Total tillage gives increased dry matter yield. Also both total tillage and minimum tillage give yields with a higher percentage of legumes compared with no-tillage. It was concluded that total tillage and minimum tillage could be used for improving native grassland. Key words : Improvement, native grassland, legumes, tillage techniques
The effect of continuous feeding of gliricidia on reproduction and production performances of Javanese Fat-Tailed sheep: Impact on the second breeding ., Supriyati; Budiarsana, I-G.M; Sutama, I-K
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 4, No 3 (1999): SEPTEMBER 1999
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (137.195 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i3.153

Abstract

The effect of continuous feeding of gliricidia on reproduction and production performances in second breeding of Javanese Fat-Tailed (JFT) sheep through the second breeding period was studied. Twenty six ewes post lactation at first lambing (body weight 22.5-26.5 kg) were divided into four treatment groups. Each group consisted of 6 animals except Group D had 8 animals. They were given King grass (Pennisetum purpureophoides) and gliricidia (Gliricidia sepium Jacq.) leaf with ratio of 100:0 (Group A = control), 75:25 (Group B), 50:50 (Group C) and 0:100 (Group D). Forages were given 2.5-3% (dry matter) of liveweight. All groups were supplemented with 100g/head/day concentrate (crude protein = 16%), but during late pregnancy and lactation they were supplemented at 200 g/head/day. Results showed that feeding gliricidia 25-100% of total forages improved body weight due to the increasing protein intake. The maximum concentration of progesteron increased from 0.81 to 2.78 ng/ml. The ovulation rate and prolification also increased significantly (P<0.05) from 1.6 to 3.0 and 1.33 to 2.38, respectively. Individual birth and weaning weights of the lambs were not affected. It is concluded that feeding gliricidia continuously up to 100% as forages and supplemented with concentrate gives positive effect on bodyweight gain, reproduction and production performances in second breeding of JFT sheep.   Key words : Sheep, gliricidia, reproduction, second breeding
Comparative studies of resistance on Indonesian Thin Tail (ITT) sheep, St. Croix, merino and the crossbreed of ITT and St. Croix, against the infection of Fasciola gigantica Widjajanti, S; Estuningsih, S.E; Partoutomo, S; Roberts, J.A; Spithill, T.W
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 4, No 3 (1999): SEPTEMBER 1999
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (145.328 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i3.158

Abstract

resistance is heritable. In order to re-evaluate this evidence, 20 ITT sheep were infected with 350 metacercariae of F. gigantica and for comparison, 10 St. Croix sheep, 10 Merino sheep and 20 crossbred of ITT x St. Croix sheep were also infected with the same dose of metacercariae. The results showed that ITT sheep was highly resistant than the other breed, whereas St. Croix and Merino sheep were susceptible. 60% of the crossbred were as resistant as ITT sheep and the other 40% were as susceptible as the St. Croix sheep. Thus, it is proposed that there might be a hereditary resistance factor such as a dominant gene which inducing the mechanism of resistance in ITT sheep, and there is some indication that IgG2 might act as a blocking antibody that interferes the mechanism of resistance.   Key words : ITT sheep, Fasciola gigantica, genetic resistance, dominant gene
The effect of protein-energy levels dietary on Kacang goats performances Martawidjaja, MuchJi; Setiadi, B; Sitorus, Sorta S
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 4, No 3 (1999): SEPTEMBER 1999
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i3.154

Abstract

An experiment was done to evaluate the protein-energy requirement for growing Kacang goats. Twelve males and 18 female goats, seven to eight months old were used in this study and randomized into three treatment groups, with four and six animals each, and were kept in individual pens. The treatments used were: R1= Elephant grass (E.G.) + concentrate C1 (21% CP; 3.9 Mcal GE/kg), R2 = E.G. + concentrate C2 (17% CP; 3.7 Mcal GE/kg), and R3 = E.G. + concentrate C3 (12% CP; 3.5 Mcal GE/kg), respectively. Fresh Elephant grass was offered in restricted, and concentrate was offered at 3% of body weight. The experiment was carried out for 12 weeks. Data were analysed by using factorial completely randomized design 2x3 (3 rations and 2 sexes). Parameters measured were: feed intake; average daily gain and feed conversion. The results indicated that among treatments there was no significant difference on dry matter (DM) and gross energy (GE) intake (P>0.05), but crude protein (CP) intake of R1 was 23,6% higher than treatment R2; treatment R2 was 38.1% higher than R3 (P<0.01). Average daily gain (ADG) between treatment R1 and R2, and between R2 and R3 were not significantly different (P>0.05), but treatment R1 was 36.9% and significantly higher than R3 (P<0.01). Feed conversion (FC) between R1 and R2, and between R2 and R3 were not significantly different (P>0.05), but ration R1 was more efficient than R3 (P<0.01). DM intake, GE intake, and ADG of male goats each were 19.4% (P<0.05); 19.0% (P<0.01), and 28.2% (P<0.01) significantly higher than the female goats. Feed conversion between male and female goats was not significantly different (P>0.05). It was concluded that protein intake and average daily gain were increased, and feed conversion was more efficient as the crude protein-energy levels increased in the ration. Feed intake and average daily gain of male goats were higher and feed conversion was more efficient than the female goats.   Key words : Protein-energy, Kacang goat

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