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Contact Name
Ahmadi Riyanto
Contact Email
medpub@litbang.deptan.go.id
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ahmadi_puslitbangnak@yahoo.com
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Kota bogor,
Jawa barat
INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 7 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 4, No 2 (1999): JUNE 1999" : 7 Documents clear
Development of inactivated-local isolate vaccine for infectious bronchitis ., Darminto
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 4, No 2 (1999): JUNE 1999
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (174.356 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i2.147

Abstract

Infectious bronchitis (IB) is an acute highly contagious viral respiratory disease of poultry caused by coronavirus. The disease causes high mortality in young chicks, reduce body weight gain in broilers and remarkable drop in egg production. IB can only be controlled by vaccination, but due to the antigenic variation among serotypes of IB viruses, the effective IB vaccine should be prepared from local isolates. The aim of this research is to develop inactivated IB vaccine derived from local IB isolates. Local isolates of IB viruses designated as I-37, I-269 and PTS-III were propagated respectively in specific pathogen free (SPF) chicken eggs, the viruses then were inactivated by formaline at final concentration of 1:1,000. Subsequently, the inactivated viruses were mixed and emulsified in oil emulsion adjuvant with sorbitant mono-oleic as an emulsifier. The vaccine then was tested for its safety, potency and efficacy in broiler chickens. Birds inoculated twice with a two-week interval by inactivated vaccine did not show any adverse reaction, either systemic or local reaction. The inoculated birds developed antibody responses with high titre, while antibody of the control birds remain negative. In addition, efficacy test which was conducted in broilers demonstrated that birds vaccinated by live-commercial vaccine and boosted three weeks later by Balitvet inactivated vaccine showed high level of antibody production which provided high level of protection against challenged virus (76% against I-37, 92% against I-269 and 68% against PTS-III challenge viruses). From this study, it can be concluded that inactivated local IB vaccine is considered to be safe, potent and efficacious. The vaccine stimulates high titre of antibody responses, which provide high level of protection against challenged viruses.   Key words: Infectious bronchitis, virus, broiler chicken, antibody, inactivated vaccine
Production response of Etawah cross breed (PE) doe due to improvement of feeding management during late pregnancy and lactation period Yulistiani, Dwi; Mathius, I-W; Sutama, I-K; Adiati, Umi
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 4, No 2 (1999): JUNE 1999
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (163.313 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i2.143

Abstract

An experiment was caried out to study the protein requirement for Etawah cross breed. Thirty Etawah cross breed does were used in this study (average body weight 37.6+3.5 kg) and randomized to obtain one of three treatments. The treatments were the protein content of concentrate supplement. The protein levels were R1 (CP 16%), R2 (CP 22%) and R3 (CP 26%). The concentrate supplements were offered during late pregnancy and early (first 3 months) lactation period. The study showed that dry matter intake during pregnancy and early lactation period was not affected by treatments. The highest average daily gain during late pregnancy reached by R3 (66.45 g/day) which was not significantly different with R2 (61.9 g/day) and R1 (48.8 g/day). The highest total birth weight per does was achieved by R2 (6.05 kg). Average daily milk production was not affected by treatment. The production at first week of lactation was 1,044.5 g/day and decreased to 466.7 g/day in week 11. R2 produced the highest average daily gain (107.8 g/day) preweaning per does, while R1 and R3 was 84 and 84.4 g/day, respectively.   Key words : Etawah cross breed (PE), pregnancy period, lactation period, protein levels
Studies on the transmission of malignant catarrhal fever in experimental animals: Bali cattle in close contact with sheep Wiyono, Agus; Damayanti, Rini
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 4, No 2 (1999): JUNE 1999
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (179.747 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i2.148

Abstract

pregnant sheep and lambing sheep were conducted in two different periods and flocks of Bali cattle and sheep. On the basis of clinico-pathological findings and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests, the study revealed that MCF transmission has been successfully achieved in four Bali cattle that were in contact with lambing sheep, and in one Bali cow that was penned 100 metres away from lambing sheep pen. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detected the causal agent of MCF in peripheral blood leucocytes (PBL) and nasal, ocular and vaginal secretions of sheep. It is assumed that viruses in the secretion were spread by sheep causing five Bali cattle suffered with MCF. However, further studies on exact mode of transmission needs to be clarified particularly on the time and mode of viral transmission from reservoir to susceptible animals.   Key words : Malignant catarrhal fever, experimental transmission, in-contact, Bali cattle, sheep
Growth and sexual development of Etawah-cross kids from does of different levels of milk production Sutama, I-Ketut; Budiarsana, I-G.M; Mathius, I-Wayan; Juarini, E
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 4, No 2 (1999): JUNE 1999
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (165.235 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i2.144

Abstract

The experiment was conducted to evaluate growth and sexual development of female Etawah-cross kids of the progeny of the does with low (Group L), medium (Group M) and high (Group H) milk production. The does were fed King grass (Pennisetum purpureophoides) (about 2% DM of liveweight) and 400 g/head of concentrate. The amount of concentrate was increased to 600 g/head during the last two months of pregnancy period and during lactation. Kids were weaned at four months of age. Thereafter, they were reared in group and were fed King grass and concentrate. The animals were weighed every two weeks. A mature vasectomized buck were joined in each group to detect the onset of first oestrus (puberty). When kids reached puberty and had a liveweight of about 20 kg, they were mated with intact buck. Ovulation rate, progesterone profiles and fertility were observed. The results showed that pre-weaning growth rates of kids in all three groups were not significantly different (67.0 vs 74.9 vs 70.5 g/day, P>0.05). At six and 12 months of ages, Groups L and M had almost the same liveweight which were higher than Group H. Consequently, Groups L and M reached puberty about 3 - 6 weeks earlier than Group H. The average liveweight at puberty was 19.9, 18.2 and 18.8 kg for Groups L, M and H, respectively, or at about 57.1-69.8% (average 63.2%) of mature liveweight. The pregnancy rate following first mating was relatively high (67-73%) and all does were pregnant in the following mating. Average ovulation rate at conception were low (1.1) in all groups. It was concluded that differences in milk production of the does did not significantly affect post-weaning growth and sexual development and performances of kids. Other factors at certain age or growth phases might be more important to affect growth and reproduction of Etawah-cross goat, and this may warrant further study.   Key words : Growth, reproduction, Etawah-cross does
The detection of ovine herpesvirus-2 in reservoir host of malignant catarrhal fever in Indonesia by means of polymerase chain reaction Wiyono, Agus
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 4, No 2 (1999): JUNE 1999
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (173.948 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i2.149

Abstract

Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a fatal disease affecting large ruminants, some wild animals and pigs. Ovine herpesvirus- 2 (OHV-2) is the causal agent of sheep-associated MCF (SA-MCF). In Indonesia, sheep is epidemiologically implicated in the occurrence of MCF. Providing a sensitive and specific molecular biological technique, i.e. polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a wide range of MCF aspects on molecular level have been developed. The PCR has been successfully used to detect OHV-2 fragment in sheep samples such as peripheral blood leucocytes (PBL) of sheep, nasal secretion of a sheep lamb, and organs of some sheep lambs. Fragment of OHV-2 was also detected in PBL of goats from some areas in Indonesia but not in PBL of pigs from Bali. These results suggest that sheep and sheep lambs are the potential reservoir hosts of MCF in Indonesia, while the role of goats as reservoir host of MCF has yet to be determined.   Key words : Ovine herpesvirus-2, polymerase chain reaction, reservoir host, malignant catarrhal fever, Indonesia
The changes of peroxide number of coconut meal during storage and fermentation processed with Aspergillus nige Hamid, Helmi; Purwadaria, T; Haryati, T; Ketaren, A.P
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 4, No 2 (1999): JUNE 1999
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (156.512 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i2.145

Abstract

The effect of fermentation process and duration of storage of fermented coconut meal with Aspergillus niger on its peroxide number has been studied. First stage of experiment was arranged in a completely randomized design with four treatments (raw coconut meal, 0 and 4 day aerobic fermentation incubation and after 2 day anaerobic enzymatic incubation). The peroxide number was determined as potentiality for rancidity. The three incubation processes decreased the peroxide number significantly. The highest reduction was obtained at 4 day aerobic fermentation (49.7%). The decrease of peroxide number of fermented coconut meal was correlated with the decrease of lipid content. The regression coefficient is highly significant (r2 = 0.76, P<0.01). In the second experiment, the effect of storage on the peroxide number of fermented product was conducted by factorial design 2x3x4 i.e., two type of substrates (fermented and non fermented coconut meal), 3 storage temperatures (-13, 4, and 29oC) and 4 storage times (1, 2, 3, and 4 months). Statistical analysis for lipid contents showed that there was significant interaction (P<0.05) between kind of substrates and storage time. The lipid content of fermented product was decreasing from the first up to the third month of storage, then it was increasing at the fourth month, but the lipid content of non fermented coconut meal did not significantly changed (P>0.05). Statistical analysis for the peroxide number showed that there was highly significant interaction between the type of substrates and storage temperature. The peroxide number on the fermented products did not significantly increase, where as the non fermented products show significantly increased during storage course. The significant interaction between storage duration and temperature observed. At low temperatures (-13 and 4°C) storage the peroxide number increased 44%, while at high temperature (29°C) up to 95%. The highest peroxide number on the fermented product (43.5 ppm) was obtained at the temperature storage of 29°C for 4 month period. This value is still under rancidity limit (80 ppm). It could be concluded that fermentation process reduced the rancidity of coconut meal.   Key words : Coconut meal, fermentation, peroxide number, Aspergillus niger
The estimation of genetic distance and discriminant variables on breed of Indonesian sheep by morphological analysis Suparyanto, Agus; Purwadaria, T; ., Subandriyo
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 4, No 2 (1999): JUNE 1999
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (177.336 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i2.142

Abstract

The morphological discriminant and canonical analyses were carried out to determine the genetic distance and discriminant variables between Indonesian breeds of thin tail sheep from Deli Serdang (North Sumatera), Ciamis and Garut (West Java) and fat tail sheep from Garahan and Pamekasan (East Java). The number of sheep randomly collected from farmers was 665 heads, while that from breeding station was 183 heads. Zoometrical variables studied were body weight, body length, wither height, chest depth, chest circumference, hip height, hip depth, hip circumference, tail length, tail width and tail thickness. SAS package program was used to analyze the data. Results from distribution mapping produced by canonical analysis and Mahalanobis distance (phenogram tree) showed that breeds are divided into two groups. The first group is thin tail sheep which consists of Ciamis, Garut and Sumatera, and the other is fat tail sheep which consists of Garahan and Pamekasan. The groups of Ciami and Garut were mixed by Garahan with 1.01 and 1.20%, respectively but were not contaminated by Pamekasan (0.00%). The highest similarity between individual inside the group was obtained from Sumatera (84.27%) due to the isolated flock. It was mixed more by Ciamis (7.87%) and Garut (5.62%) than Garahan (1.69%) and Pamekasan (0.50%). Results from canonical analysis also showed that body length, chest circumference, hip circumference, and body weight was less discriminant variables to determine the differences between breeds, while the most discriminant variables were obtained by tail length, tail width and tailthickness.   Key words : Sheep, genetic distance, morphology

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