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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 18 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 4, No 1 (1999)" : 18 Documents clear
Effect of artificial insemination practices on the improvement of income of dairy cattle farmers in West Java Sugiarti, Tatit; Siregar, Sori B
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 4, No 1 (1999)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (138.632 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i1.130

Abstract

A study was done to evaluate the effect of artificial insemination (AI) on the improvement of farmers income. This study was conducted in Bandung district, where doing cattle population was concentrated, from which four locations were chosen, namely : Pangalengan, Kertasari, Lembang and Cisarua. In this study 1,800 non pregnant and healthy cows were selected. Artificial Insemination practices applied were : insemination at 60-90 days post partum precise check estrous and precise insemination time (9-24 hour after the first sign of estrous). Data of these 1,800 cows collected in the previous study was used as control data. Pregnancy was determined through non return rate (NRR) method and confirmed by rectal palpation. To study the impact of AI on farmers income, 30 farmers from each location were sampled. Data was obtained through a survey and was analysed based on descriptive and partial methods as it is commonly used in similar studies. The dairy cattle farming in each location was only part of the agriculture business own by farmers. Therefore the composition of cattle raised was not balanced productive and nonproductive cattle. Practices of AI in this study significantly reduce the lactation length : 363 to 312 days for Pangalengan, 355 to 316 days for Kertasari, 368 to 313 days for Lembang and 348 to 321 days for Cisarua. This optimalization of lactation length increases the farmers income as much as follow : Rp 615.02/head/days for Pangalengan, Rp 615.17 /head/day for Kertasari, Rp 601.32/head/day for Lembang and Rp 301.08/head/day for Cisarua. The application of AI practices in this study affect the income of farmers significantly, but the real application in rural areas needs special attention especially on the facilities for AI, in order to get the optimum result.   Key words : Dairy cows, AI, lactation length, milk production, farmers income  
Integrity of swamp buffalo sperm on a variety of semen freezing process ., Herdis; Purwantara, B; Supriatna, I; Putu, I.G
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 4, No 1 (1999)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (156.795 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i1.131

Abstract

Sperm of swamp buffalo bulls is easily damaged during freezing process. Acrosomal intact and plasma membrane intact is important factors in fertilization process. This experiment was aimed to study the effect of freezing method on sperm integrity. The result of experiment indicated that the mean of intact acrosomal and the intact plasma membrane for 4 hours of equilibration (52.24 ± 3.70% and 54.34 ± 4.80%) was significant higher (P<0.05) than 2 hours of equilibration (39.00 ± 3.32% and 43.44 ± 4.91%) but was not significantly difference (P>0.05) with 6 hours of equilibration (47.92 ± 4.51% and 51.58 ± 4.25%). There were not significance difference between one step and two step of glycerolization. The best sperm integrity was resulted by freezing method with 4 hours of equilibration and two steps glicerolization.   Key words : Swamp buffalo bulls, sperm integrity, freezing process
The recovery rate of embryos using eight different protocols of synchronization and superovulation in sheep Caroline, WieWie; Summers, P.M
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 4, No 1 (1999)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (151.709 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i1.132

Abstract

A large number of embryo recovery and also transferable is a major problem in superovulation regime of the ewe. The purpose of the study was to recover a large number of transferable embryos by using eight different protocols of synchronization and superovulation for each group of sheep. In this study, the Merino ewes aged between 1-3 years and rams between 2-5 years were used. The embryos were collected surgically on day-7, day-8, day-9 and day-10 after the onset of oestrus. The mean number of normal embryos recovered (3.90±1.49) at day 7 with oFSH alone (4-4.5ml) and the combination of oFSH (4-4.5ml) with PMSG (400 IU) was significantly higher (P<0.01) than in the sheep treated with PMSG (1,200 IU) alone (0.92±0.32). The results of this study showed that a mixture of oFSH and PMSG gives the best result in embryo recovery of the ewe and also transferable compared to other methods.   Key words : Embryo, sheep, superovulation
Responses of two genotypes of lambs on the infection of Haemonchus contortus and the level of energy supplements Ginting, Simon P; Batubara, Aron; Romjali, Endang; Rangkuti, M; ., Subandriyo
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 4, No 1 (1999)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (180.216 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i1.133

Abstract

A study was conducted to evaluate the responses of lambs on the infection of Haemonchus contortus and the level of energy supplements. Forty eight male lambs, 3-4 months old were used in a factorial experimental design (2x2x2) which lasted for 9 weeks. The factors were breed (Local Sumatra and Sungai Putih: 50% Local Sumatra, 25% St. Croix; 25% Barbados Blackbelly), level of Haemonchus infection (3,000 L3 and 1,500 L3 per week) and level of energy supplement (2,900 kcal/kg DM and 2,300 kcal/kg DM). Infection at 3,000 L3 decreased (P<0.05) ADG of lambs of both energy levels. An extremely low ADG (10-16 g) was observed in 3000 L3 group given low energy level. Body condition of lambs fed high energy level was constant over the experiment, but it decreased at the rate of 0.9 to 1.1 unit at the low energy supplement. EPG was higher (P>0.001) in the 3000 L3 group, was lower (P<0.05) in the Local Sumatra, but not affected (P>0.10) by energy level. PCV was not affected (P>0.10) by infection levels, but lower (P<0.01) in the low energy group or in the St Croix crosses. Eosinophil and serum protein concentration were not affected by energy and infection level, but they were higher (P<0.01) in the local Sumatra. It was concluded that strong effects of level of infection and genotype was detected to influence the impact of Haemonchus infection in lambs. However, the effect of energy levels was less consistent as judged from the EPG, PCV, eosinophil and serum protein data.   Key words : Energy level, genotype, infection level, Haemonchus contortus, lambs
Carcass and carcass cuts of F1 crossbred chickens of Pelung x Kampung given diets varied in protein content Iskandar, Sofjan; Resnawati, Hety; Zainuddin, Desmayati
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 4, No 1 (1999)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (136.848 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i1.134

Abstract

Observation on carcass and carcass cuts of F1 crossbred of Pelung x Kampung chickens influenced by dietary protein (15%, 17%, 19%, and 21% crude protein=CP) was carried out at the Research Institute for Animal Production, Ciawi Bogor. There were 360-day-old chicks of the crossbred, allocated to 9 dietary-protein treatments. The treatments were P1 (21%-17% CP), which was the ration with 21% CP given to chicks aged of 0-6 weeks, then continued with 17% CP ration up to 12 week of age; P2 was 21%-15% CP; P3 was 19%-19% CP; P4 was 19%-17% CP; P5 was 19%-15% CP; P6 was 17%-17% CP; P7 was 17%- 15% CP; P8 was 15%-19% CP and P9 was 15%-15% CP. At 6 and 12 weeks of age each two out of 10 birds per cage were randomly picked for carcass and carcass portion analysis. Results showed that carcass and wings of 6 weeks of age birds were not significantly (P>0.05) influenced by dietary protein, whilst breast and thighs & drumsticks were significantly (P<0.05) lower on lower dietary protein. The weight of carcass and carcass parts were 256, 58, 71, 32, 44, 8.6, 9.7 and 2.09 g/bird, for carcass, breast, thighs and drumsticks, wings, oval; liver, gizzard and abdominal fat, respectively. At 12 weeks of age, weight of carcass and carcass cuts were not affected by dietary protein. The weight of carcass and carcass cuts of 12 weeks of age were 803, 189, 251, 102, 123, 20, 25 and 21 g/bird, for carcass, breast, thighs and drumsticks, wings, oval, liver, gizzard and abdominal fat, respectively. The results indicated that ration with 15% CP given up to 12 weeks of age was recommended to be optimum without any reduction in carcass quality.   Key words: F1 crossbred of Pelung x Kampung chickens, dietary protein, carcass and carcass cuts
Development of alpha hemolytic verotoxigenic Escherichia coli vaccine: Verotoxic antibody responses in experimental animals, mice, rabbits and dairy cows ., Supar; Peorwadikarta, B; Kurniasih, Nina; ., Djaenuri
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 4, No 1 (1999)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (192.083 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i1.135

Abstract

Escherichia coli isolates showing alpha hemolytic on blood agar were found in calves with bloody diarrhoea from Bandung, Sukabumi and Bogor. Three E. coli isolates designated as (B34c, B909, B910) were pathogenic for mice and selected for vaccine candidates. Crude supernatant of tryptic soy broth (TSB) cultures precipitated with saturated ammoniumsulphate caused cytopathic effect on vero cell line. For vaccine preparation the isolates were grown on tryptic soy agar (TSA). Whole cell inactive vaccine containing equal proportion of each isolate was prepared and emulsified in aluminum hydroxide gel at a final concentration of 1.5% and cell concentration equal to the tube number 10 of MacFarland standard. Mice and rabbits were injected subcutaneously of monovalent vaccine with the dose of 0.2 ml and 1 ml respectively. Four weeks later mice or rabbits were boostered with the same dose. Before injection each animal was bleed, subsequently every two weeks period up to 4 weeks after the second injection. The sera were separated and kept at -20oC up to serological assay with an enzyme linked immunoassay (ELISA) was done. Vaccinated mice with VTEC were challenged with homologous isolate did not die, where as 60% of unvaccinated mice died within 2 days post challenged. Pregnant cows were given 2 doses of three valent vaccine 6 weeks and again 2 weeks before expected date of calving. Calves born were given colostrum and milk of the own mother. The three day old calf was challenged with three isolates of verotoxigenic E. coli studied. Calves born from vaccinated cows did not show diarrhoea at post challenged, whereas calf from unvaccinated cow demonstrated bloody diarrhoea at post challenged. From the experimental animals (mice and calves) demonstrated the presence of protection against challenged. The antiverotoxic antibody probably involved in important role of immunoprotection. These were supported by the presence of high titer anti verotoxic antibody in serum of experimental animals (mice and cows), as well as in experimental rabbits, but none in the unvaccinated animals.   Key words: E. coli, alpha hemolytic, verotoxic, dysentery, vaccine
Effects of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae cytotoxins on generation of oxygen radicals by porcine neutrophils Tarigan, Simson
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 4, No 1 (1999)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (161.106 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i1.136

Abstract

Cytotoxins produced by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (App) suggested to be the most important pathogenic and virulent factors for this organism. However, the mechanisms on how the cytotoxins contribute to the disease process remain unclear. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the cytotoxins on the oxidative-burst metabolism of porcine neutrophils. In this study, neutrophils were firstly loaded with an oxidative probe dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFHDA) then expose to cytotoxins. Cells producing oxygen radicals emitted fluorescence and its intensity was measured with a FACScan flow cytometer. All cytotoxins derived from either App serotypes producing ApxI and ApxII, App serotypes producing ApxII only, or App serotypes producing ApxII and ApxIII were capable of stimulating neutrophils for oxygen-radical generation. However, compared with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), App cytotoxins were much weaker as stimulants for oxygen radicals. In addition, Apx preparation stimulated an oxidative-burst metabolism of neutrophils at a low, narrow range of Apx doses. At higher doses, the toxins inhibit the oxidative burst metabolism. The effects of cytotoxins produced by App during infection on recruited neutrophils into the lungs are assumed to be comparable to those observed in this in vitro study. Neutrophils, and other host cells, adjacent to the bacteria become lysis due to high toxin concentration, whereas those at some distance to the bacteria produce oxygen radicals which in turn cause tissue damage or necrosis.   Key words: Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, cytotoxin, Apx, neutrophils, pig, oxygen radical, flow cytometry  
The effect of artificial dehydration on the survival and reproduction of Lymnaea rubiginosa Widjajanti, S
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 4, No 1 (1999)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (139.332 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i1.137

Abstract

The effect of artificial dehydration on snail Lymnaea rubiginosa was investigated in the laboratory by monitoring its survival and development, because as aquatic organism, this snail must be able to adapt or tolerate with the changes in its habitat. Fifty laboratory-reared L. rubiginosa with shell length between 1.0-1.5 cm (adult) were placed in each sloping earth aquarium (60x80x20 cm) which were already filled with water about 15 cm depth. Five aquaria were used in this study, and one week after being established the water from 4 aquaria was drained while one aquarium was retained with water as a control. The water was replaced in one of dehydrated aquarium each week for four weeks, commencing one week after draining the water. The survival of snails in each aquarium were recorded every two days over a period of 3 months. The results indicated that the mortality rate of adult snails increased as the period of dehydration increased. After four week dehydration only 16% of adult snails survive compared to 68% survival in the control aquarium, and dehydration for 4 weeks prolonged the hatching time of eggs. Moreover, in dehydrated aquaria, the egg masses were deposited in a random pattern on the surface of the soil, whereas in the control aquarium they were laid on the soil-water junction.   Key words : Dehydration, Lymnaea rubiginosa, survival, fasciolosis
Characterisation of protein antigen from Fasciola gigantica of different age Estuningsih, S Endah; Widjajanti, S
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 4, No 1 (1999)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (151.081 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i1.138

Abstract

The protein antigens extracted from adult fluke Fasciola gigantica, 3, 6 and 9 weeks old and newly excysted juvenile (NEJ) were identified using SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting techniques. Sera from fat-tailed sheep which artificially infected with the metacercariae of F. gigantica were used for immunoblotting. The results showed that the protein antigen profile of adult fluke, 6 and 9 weeks old flukes had similar. Bands with molecular weight between 24 kDa to 114 kDa. Protein bands with molecular weight <24 kDa and >198 kDa were also detected from the adult fluke. The use of immunoblotting technique, there were two antigenic protein molecules identified from adult fluke, NEJ and 3, 6, and 9 weeks old fluke with the molecular weight 46 kDa and 47 kDa. The protein band with molecular weight >198 kDa shown thicker on the NEJ than that of adult fluke, and 6 and 9 weeks old flukes. The role of protein with molecular weight of 46 and 47 kDa were the interested findings need to be evaluatedfor serological analysis.   Key words : Protein antigen, Fasciola gigantica, SDS-PAGE, immunoblotting
Sambiloto (Andrographis paniculata Nees.) for reducing aflatoxsins contamination in commercial chicken feed Rachmawati, Sri; Arifin, zainal; Zahari, Paderi
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 4, No 1 (1999)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (157.78 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i1.139

Abstract

Indonesian climate condition is suitable for growing of mold such as Aspergillus flavus. The mold grown in feed and feed ingredients cause aflatoxins contamination of the feed. Sambiloto has been reported to reduce the growth of Aspergillus flavus and aflatoxins production in feed isolate. The aim of the study was to find the used of sambiloto in reducing aflatoxins contamination in commercial chicken feed. The feed was homogenously mixed then divided into 4 groups with 3 replicates. The samples were treated with sambiloto 0.04%, 0.08% and 0.16% respectively into the feed, except for the control feed sambiloto was not added. Into these feed 4 ml of Aspergillus flavus suspension was also added. Then the feed in each group was incubated at room temperature for 10 days. Samples were collected from each group at days 0, 5 and 10 of incubation times for aflatoxins analysis. Samples were extracted and aflatoxins were detected by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Observation results indicated that sambiloto concentration of 0.16% in feed can inhibit the total aflatoxins production of 16.46% and gave the inhibitation percentage of aflatoxin B1 of 45.39%. Statistical test showed that the used of sambiloto in feed for 5 days incubation times gave significant result in reducing aflatoxins production. However the 10 days incubation times of the feed with sambiloto gave in significant result. It is suggested that to get optimum inhibition of aflatoxins production, sambiloto added in feed should be higher than 0.16%.   Key words : Feed, aflatoxin, sambiloto

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