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Ahmadi Riyanto
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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 20 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 3, No 3 (1998)" : 20 Documents clear
Growth rate of sheep fed high fat ration Lubis, Darwinsyah; Wina, E.M; Rubiono, Bambang E
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 3, No 3 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (160.195 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i3.108

Abstract

Incorporating high amount of fats into the ration for ruminants will affect the rumen microbes adversely and will reducefiber digestion potential. To correct such negative effects, the free fatty acids used for feed should be bond with Ca++, so it canpassing through the rumen savely (rumen by-pass fat). To test the Ca-fat utilization biologically, 20 growing male Garut shee pwere used and fed with 4 type of isocaloric-isoprotein concentrate feed which were allotted based on a randomized block desig nwith 5 replications. The concentrate (C)-A was a positive control diet, while C-B was substituted with 10% free fatty acids (negative control), C-C was substituted with 10% Ca-fat, and C-D with 15% Ca-fat. The concentrate feed was fed at 500 g/d, while forage (King grass) was 4 kg/d. Results of the experiment showed that the negative effect of free fatty acids can be corrected if it was given in the form of Ca-fat. Growth rate curve indicating a good growing pattern, with average daily gain was 100.18, 87.68, 112.86, and 115.00 g/d (P<0.05) for C-A, C-B, C-C, and C-D treatments, respectively. Total dry matter intake for the respective 4 treatments were 875.9, 855.2, 866.7, and 847.4 g/d (P>0.05). Carcass production was relatively good, where for C-A, C-B, C-C, and C-D were 14.84, 14.68, 16.34, and 15.72 kg (P<0.05) respectively, with final live weights of 34.00, 31.74, 34.58, and 34.30 kg (P<0.05). It can be concluded that Ca-fat (rumen by-pass fat) can be used as an energy source component for growing sheep diet, and give the best result at 10% substitution rate in concentrate feed.   Key words : Rumen by-pass fat, growth rate, carcass, sheep
Effects of molasses addition to ration on the productivity of Kacang goats Martawidjaja, MuchJi; Setiadi, B; Sitorus, S
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 3, No 3 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (131.386 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i3.109

Abstract

The experiment was conducted in Cilebut Experiment Station, Bogor, with the aim to improve the productivity of Kacang goats. Twenty male goats, 9-10 months old, with an average initial liveweight of 16.27 kg were used. The goats were randomly divided into four treatments with five animals each, and were kept by grouped pen system. The dietary treatments were: (R0) = Elephant grass (EG) + concentrate (C0), (R1) = EG + (95% C0 + 5% molasses), (R2) = EG + (90% C0 + 10% molasses), (R3) = EG + (85% C0 + 15% molasses), respectively. The Elephant grass was offered ad libitum while the concentrate was offered at 3% of total body weight per treatment group. The experiment was carried out for 14 weeks. Feed intake per treatment group, individual weight gain, and feed conversion were analyzed. Average daily gain was analyzed in a completely randomized design. The results indicated that R0 (0% molasses), R1 (5% molasses), R2 (10% molasses) and R3 (15% molasses), did not significantly affect the average daily weight gain (P>0.05) with an overall mean of ADG to be 55.6 g/head/day. Feed intake and feed conversion were not significantly different among dietary treatments with an average dry matter intake of 2,621 g/5 heads/day or 524 g/head/day; protein intake was 370 g/5 heads/day or 74.0 g/head/day with energy intake of 10.929 Mcal/5 heads/day or 2.186 Mcal/head/day, and feed conversion of 9.43. In conclusion, the fact that molasses addition to rations did not affect feed intake, daily weight gain and feed conversion indicating that the molasses addition did not improve the Kacang goats fattening productivity.   Key words : Productivity, goats, molasses
The use of kemiri seed meal (Aleurites mollucana Willd.) in native chickens diet Resnawati, Hesti; Iskandar, S; ., Surayah
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 3, No 3 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (133.084 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i3.110

Abstract

An experiment was carried out to evaluate the optimum level of kemiri seed meal for native chickens. One hundred unsexed day-old native chickens were reared in 20 cages with five birds per cage. Five dietary treatments were formulated to contain different levels of kemiri seed meal: 0% (R0), 5% (R5), 10% (R10), 15% (R15) and 20% (R20). All diets were formulated to be isoprotein and isoenergy with 14% crude protein and 2,850 kcal ME/ kg diet. The experiment was arrangedin a completely randomized design with five treatments and four replicates. Feed consumption, body weight gain and intestinal weight were significantly (P<0.01) affected by inclusion of kemiri seed meal in the diet. But the feed conversion, carcass weight and liver weight were not affected significantly. It was concluded that kemiri seed meal can be added until 5% in the diet of growing native chickens.   Key words : Native chickens, kemiri seed meal, growth
Nutritional evaluation of hominy as poultry feed Kompiang, I Putu; ., Supriyati
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 3, No 3 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (138.624 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i3.111

Abstract

A series of chemical, biological assay and growth trials were conducted to determine the nutritive value of hominy, relative to corn. The crude protein, ash, NDF and ADF content of hominy were 10.25%, 2.10%, 19.10% and 4.70% respectively, and are higher than the corn level, 8.5%, 0.40%, 2.30% and 1.90% respectively. While its crude fat (3.20%) and metabolize energy (3,020 kcal/kg) contents were lower than the corn level 4,40% and 330 kcal/kg. Seven hundred DOC broilers of commercial strain were used for growth trial for 42 days. The birds were divided into 5 treatments group with 4 replications (35 bird/replicate). Experimental rations, starter and finisher, were formulated with graded levels of hominy on the expense of corn (A = 0%, B = 33.3%, C = 50%, D= 66.6% and E = 100%) with similar level of crude protein and metabolize energy. Feed consumption was not affected (P>0.05) by the treatments, however body weight gain (BWG) and feed conversion ratio (FCR) were both significantly (P<0.05) affected by the treatments. Body weight gain of treatment A (1,712 g) was similar to treatment B (1,683 g) and C (1,682 g) but significantly (P<0.05) higher than treatment D (1,598 g) and E (1,570 g). Feed convertion ratio of treatment A (2.17) was similar to the treatment B (2.26) but significantly better (P<0.05) than treatment C (2.30), D (2.36) and E (2.39). Carcass quality was not affected by the treatments except for the shank color, where treatment A (7.38) was significantly yellower than the other treatments (B=2.50, C=2.75, D=1.75 and E=1.0). It is concluded that the protein content of hominy is higher than corn, but its metabolize energy was lower than the corn. Hominy could be included in the ration replacing corn up to 33.3% without affecting performance of the bird.   Key words : Poultry, hominy, nutrient
Solid state fermentation of palm kernel meal by using Aspergillus niger ., Supriyati; Pasaribu, T; Hamid, H; Sinurat, A.P
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 3, No 3 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (152.824 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i3.112

Abstract

The solid state fermentation technique on palm kernel meal by using Aspergillus niger wild type and NRRL 337 was studied. The fermentation was carried out at 30oC for 3 days continued with enzymatic process at room temperature and 40oC for 2 days. The result showed that at the third days of fermentation spores started to grow on the surface. The 3rd days fermentation can improve protein content and in vitro digestibility (IVDMD) with minimal loss of dry matter. The dry matter contents at 3 days fermentation were 48.88 and 48.83% for product using Aspergillus niger wild type and NRRL 337. Combination 3 days fermentation and 2 days enzymatic process at room temperature by using Aspergillus niger NRRL 337 type gave the best product with optimal IVDMD value and protein digestibility of 51.47 and 71.33%.   Key words : Palm kernel meal, fermentation, Aspergillus niger
Effects of defaunator combined with microbial growth factors on ruminal digestibility ofrice Thalib, Amlius; Devi, D; Widiawati, Y; Mas’ud, Z.A
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 3, No 3 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (477.359 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i3.113

Abstract

A system of defaunating agent combined with microbial growth factors (FPM) was conducted to improve the ruminal digestion of rice straw. Combination of methanol-extracted Sapindus rarak fruit (EKM) with each FPM was added into anaerobic medium of ruminal fermentation. Rice straw was used as substrate and inoculum used was rumen fluid of sheep. Fermentation microbial of the substrate was incubated at 39°C for 96 hours. The experiment consisted of 10 treatments: control without EKM; control + EKM (1 .000 ppm); control +EKM combined with Zn (8 ppm), Cu (0 .8 ppm), folic acid (0.1 ppm), thiaminhydrochloride (0 .05 ppm), riboflavin (0.05 ppm), phenylpropionic acid (100 ppm), molasses (45 ppin), and mixture of all FPM used (Mix FPM). Measurements were: gas production; protozoal and bacterial populations; contents of volatile fatty acids (VFA), lactic acid andNH3N; pH ofmedium. The results show that FPM increase EKM effects on rwninal digestibility of rice straw except treatments of thiaminhydrocloride and riboflavin. The highest cumulative gas production was obtained by treatment of EKM combined with Mix FPM (168 ml versus 91 nrl of treatment of EKM with out FPM). EKM individually or combined with FPM could eliminate 46-83% protozoal population, where the highest elimination of protozoal population was given by combination of EKM with Mix FPM(83%): Elimination of protozoal population caused increment of bacterial population on all treatments except on folic acid treatment. The highest increment ofbacterial population was given by treatment of combination EKMwith Mix FPM (>500%). Therefore combination of EKMwith Mix FPM is concluded to be the most effective in improving ruminal digestibility of rice straw.   Key words : Defaunating agent, microbial growth factors, rruninal digestion
Serological study against transmissible gastroenteritis (TGE) virus in several area in Indonesia Sendow, Indrawati; Syafriati, Tatty; Bahri, Sjamsul; Sarosa, Antonius
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 3, No 3 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (161.884 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i3.114

Abstract

A number of 1,168 pig and dog sera from 8 provinces in Indonesia were tested serologically for transmissible gastroenteritis (TGE) antibodies using serum neutralisation test to detect the prevalence of TGE in Indonesia. The sera were obtained from serum bank at Research Institute for Veterinary Science, Bogor. All sera collected before 1995 were negative antibody to TGE. However, sera collected from 2 provinces Sumatera Utara and Sulawesi Utara in 1996 had antibodies against TGE virus (14.03%). Titration of reacted sera showed varied between titres of 8 to 128.   Key words: Transmissible gastroenteritis virus, serum neutralization test
The use of filter paper as a transport device for serology of Pasteurella multocida infection : Analysis and comparison ofprotein composition of filter paper extract and serum Natalia, Lily; Priadi, Adin
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 3, No 3 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (573.496 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i3.115

Abstract

Two methods for collecting blood specimens for measuring antibody to Pasteurella multocida were compared. Blood was collected on filter-paper strips, air-dried and stored at 4°C along with paired samples collected by venepumeture . Analysis using sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed that the protein composition of filter paper extract and serum was similar. Both samples had common proteins of 67, 52-58 and 27 kDa. However, there are two proteins bands of 14 and 30 kDa that were only found in, filter-paper extract. Westernblot analysis also showed that samples from both sampling techniques reacted to P. multocida proteins of 43 kDa. Samples from experimental and field animals were also collected by the two techniques and assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for P. multocida antibodies . The agreement between samples from experimental animals and the field using ELISA was analyzed . Samples from experimental animals, showed a very high correlation (r = 0.931) in ELISA results among samples collected by the two techniques. However, the correlation was lower (r = 0.799) in samples collected from the field. Cost analysis showed that filter-paper collection technique was 100 times more economical compared to venepuncture technique. It was concluded that eluates of whole blood dried on filter paper can be used as an alternative to sera in ELISA for measuring antibodies to P. multocida.   Key words : Pasteurella multocida, serological tests, filter paper
Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae cytotoxins on size, granularity and viability of porcine neutrophils Tarigan, Simson
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 3, No 3 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1064.805 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i3.116

Abstract

Cytotoxins produced by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae are supposed to play major roles in bacterial pathogenicity and virulence. To gain better understanding in the mechanism of the pathogenicity, cytotoxic activities of the toxins on porcine neutrophils were investigated in vitro. Changes in cell size, granularity and viability were examined with a flow cytometer. Cell size and granularity correlate with forward light scatter and right angle light scatter, respectively; whereas, cell viability corresponds with fluorescent intensity of cells stained with propidium iodide . At low concentrations (dilutions between 1/10 and 1/100 of bacterial culture supernatants),  the cytotoxins induced severe swelling and degranulation of neutrophils; whereas, at higher concentrations (dilutions of 51/10 bacterial culture supernatants), the cytotoxins caused rapid cell death. There was no significant difference in cytotoxic activities of Cyooxins derived from various serotypes (serotypes 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7  ) of A. pleuropneumoniae . Morphologically, the cytotoxin-treated neutrophils stained with Giemsa showed profound changes. Neutrophils treated with low dosages of Cyooxins became swollen with spherical nuclei . Higher concentration of cytotoxins study indicates strongly that important mechanism in the caused vactiolation of cytoplasts, enlargement or disintegration of nuclei . This in vitro intoxication of neutrophils by cytotoxins produced by A. pleuropneumoniae comprises anpathogenicity of the bacteria.   Key words : Actitiobacilluspleuropneumoniae, cytotoxin, neutrophils, pig, flow cytometry
The preparation of Dermatophilus congolensis antigen and its testing by means of immunodiffusion test and electrophoresis Gholib, Djaenudin; ., Subiyanto
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 3, No 3 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (695.175 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i3.117

Abstract

The filtrate antigen ofDermatophilus congolensis was prepared based on the Makinde method, whereas the whole cell antigen was based on the Bida and Kelley method. Filtrate antigen of Dermatophilus congolensis has been tested with positive serum from experimental animals, guinea pigs and sheep by means of immurrodiffitsion test and electrophoresis . Positive serum was produced by inoculation of whole cell antigen of D. congolensis to the animals . The results showed that the immunodiffusion test resulted in one and two precipitation lines with positive serum of sheep and guinea pigs respectively. Electrophoresis SDS-PAGE presented about 8 bands with molecular weight in the range from above 30 kD to more than 94 kD. The bands were then transferred into nitrocellulose membrane and gave positive reaction with positive serum from sheep.   Key words : Antigen, Dermatophilus congolensis, immunodiffusion, electrophoresis

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