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Ahmadi Riyanto
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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 21 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 3, No 2 (1998)" : 21 Documents clear
Estimation of demand and supply relationships for beef cattle in Lampung Priyanti, Atien; Soedjana, T.D; Martondang, R; Sitepu, P
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 3, No 2 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (794.221 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i2.97

Abstract

An increase in per capita income is followed by an increased demand in number and quality of meat . The purpose of the study was to identify and qualifying factors that influence the demand and supply of beef, and to determine the magnitude of response related to the increase in per capita income. In this study, the time series data from 1970 through 1993 was used and collected from the Directorate General for Livestock Services and Central Bureau of Statistics for the province ofLampung. The parameters observed were production and consumption of beef, retail price, population, per capita income and input price of beef production . A 2SLS method was used to perform the analysis . The results of this study showed that estimated demand and supply relationships using the simultaneous model of2SLS method is appropriate for beef cattle . The results indicated  that retail price of beef is determined simultaneously by demand and supply linkages (P<0.01) . In addition, people in Lampung were responsive enough to anticipate changes on per capita income and lead to the potential for developing Lampung as a strategic beef industry area in Indonesia.   Key words : Supply, demand, beef
Performances of the first and second generation composite breed resulting from crossing between local Sumatra sheep and hair sheep ., Subandriyo; Setiadi, Bambang; Rangkuti, M; Diwyanto, K
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 3, No 2 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (53.569 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i2.98

Abstract

Improving sheep productivity can be conducted by genetic improvement and improving environmental factors. Genetic improvement usually can be done by selection and creating composite or synthetic breed by crossbreeding. Composite breed created by crossbreeding between different breeds and followed by selection. The study of crossing between Sumatra sheep with fat-tail sheep from East Java, St . Croix hair sheep (US) and Barbados Blackbelly hair sheep has been carried out since 1986, and show that the crossbred are better in term of production and reproduction . In 1996/1997, the first generation (F1) of composite breed (KOM) has been created by crossing between Barbados Cross (BC) rams and St . Croix Cross (HC) ewes or reciprocally. The second generation (F2) of composite breed has been created by inter-se mating . However, F1-KOM and F2-KOM  vary in their performances, therefore selection should be conducted. The results showed that birth weight and weaning weight of crossing between BC rams and HC ewes tended to be heavier than those of reciprocal crossing between HC rams and BC ewes, but the differences were not significant (P>0 .05) . Birth weight and weaning weight of crossing between BC rams with HC ewes and reciprocal cross were 2.48 _+ 0.70 kg (n=791), 12 .50 _+ 3 .26 kg (n=640) and 2.37 _+ 0.62 kg (n=147), 12 .29 _+ 3.30kg (n=122), respectively . Meanwhile, observations of inter-se mating of Fl-KOM showed that the weight at the first mating was 26 .7 _+ 3.82 kg (n=80), age of dam at the first lambing was 15 .7 _+ 1 .73 months (n=83), weight at post-partum was 29 .86 _+ 3 .30 kg, and litter size at the first parity was 1 .43 _+ 0.59 (n=83) . The mean of age at the first mating of KOM was around 10 .7 months. Mean of mating weight at the second parity was 28 .29 +_ 3 .51 kg (n=11), age of dam at the  second lambing was 20.6 _+ 1 .99 month (n=11), post-partum weight was 26 .92 _+ 4.03 kg (n=11) and litter size was 1 .64 _+ 0.81 (n=11) . Weaning weight of Fl-KOM, F2-KOM, BC, HC and St. Croix (H) after adjusted by season, sex, age of dam and type of birth were significantly different among Fl-KOM with F2-KOM, BC, HC, and H. However, there were no significantly different among F2-KOM with BC and HC. The results of the study indicated that for improving selection respons, the corrections or adjustments of environmentally induced superiority (sex, type of birth and age of dam at lambing) for every genotype and certain generation should be conducted, in order to increase the rate of genetic improvement.   Key words : Composite breed, first generation, second generation
Performances of the first and second generation composite breed resulting from crossing between local Sumatra sheep and hair sheep. ., Subandriyo; Setiadi, Bambang; Rangkuti, M; Diwyanto, K; Doloksaribu, M; Batubara, Leo P; Romjali, Endang; Eliaser, Simo; Handiwirawan, Eko
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 3, No 2 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i2.99

Abstract

Improving sheep productivity can be conducted by genetic improvement and improving environmental factors. Genetic improvement usually can be done by selection and creating composite or synthetic breed by crossbreeding. Composite breed created by crossbreeding between different breeds and followed by selection. The study of crossing between Sumatra sheep with fat-tail sheep from East Java, St . Croix hair sheep (US) and Barbados Blackbelly hair sheep has been carried out since 1986, and show that the crossbred are better in term of production and reproduction . In 1996/1997, the first generation (F1) of composite breed (KOM) has been created by crossing between Barbados Cross (BC) rams and St . Croix Cross (HC) ewes or reciprocally. The second generation (F2) of composite breed has been created by inter-se mating . However, F1-KOM and F2-KOM  vary in their performances, therefore selection should be conducted. The results showed that birth weight and weaning weight of crossing between BC rams and HC ewes tended to be heavier than those of reciprocal crossing between HC rams and BC ewes, but the differences were not significant (P>0 .05) . Birth weight and weaning weight of crossing between BC rams with HC ewes and reciprocal cross were 2.48 _+ 0.70 kg (n=791), 12 .50 _+ 3 .26 kg (n=640) and 2.37 _+ 0.62 kg (n=147), 12 .29 _+ 3.30kg (n=122), respectively . Meanwhile, observations of inter-se mating of Fl-KOM showed that the weight at the first mating was 26 .7 _+ 3.82 kg (n=80), age of dam at the first lambing was 15 .7 _+ 1 .73 months (n=83), weight at post-partum was 29 .86 _+ 3 .30 kg, and litter size at the first parity was 1 .43 _+ 0.59 (n=83) . The mean of age at the first mating of KOM was around 10 .7 months. Mean of mating weight at the second parity was 28 .29 +_ 3 .51 kg (n=11), age of dam at the  second lambing was 20.6 _+ 1 .99 month (n=11), post-partum weight was 26 .92 _+ 4.03 kg (n=11) and litter size was 1 .64 _+ 0.81 (n=11) . Weaning weight of Fl-KOM, F2-KOM, BC, HC and St. Croix (H) after adjusted by season, sex, age of dam and type of birth were significantly different among Fl-KOM with F2-KOM, BC, HC, and H. However, there were no significantly different among F2-KOM with BC and HC. The results of the study indicated that for improving selection respons, the corrections or adjustments of environmentally induced superiority (sex, type of birth and age of dam at lambing) for every genotype and certain generation should be conducted, in order to increase the rate of genetic improvement.   Key words : Composite breed, first generation, second generation
Influence of feeding protected protein and energy on intake and digestion by lambs Mathius, I-W; Haryanto, B; Susana, I.W.R
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 3, No 2 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (762.624 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i2.100

Abstract

To determine the effect of additional protected protein and energy on intake and digestion in lambs, a trial was conducted using 36 young sheep (average body weight 24 .8 _+ 1 .7 kg) in a completely randomized design . Combination of three levels of protected protein (0, 10 and 20%, based on the dry matter of the concentrate offered) and three levels of protected energy (0, 5, 10%, based on the dry matter of the concentrate offered) were added into concentrate diet and fed to growing sheep. Results showed that different levels of feed additive did not affect (P>0 .05) intake of dry matter, organic matter, neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber and metabolizable energy, with average of 76 .3 g, 68.9 g, 31 .2 g, 16 .79 g and 0.75 MJ /kg BW0.75 respectively . Level of protected protein gave significant (P<0 .05) respons on crude protein intake (7 .4 vs 8.7 vs 9.8 g/kg BW0.75) . Combination of protected protein and energy did not affect animal ability to digest the nutrient effectively. A mixtures of 20 % protected protein and 5 %energy addition into concentrate diet increased average daily gain (ADG) as much as 100 g. It was also found that for every gram ADG needs 42.2 kJ metabolizable energy .   Key words : Protein, protected energy, sheep
Availability of phosphorus in defluorinated rock phosphate and bone meal for broiler chickens as assessed by a slope ratio assay Ketaren, P.P; Silalahi, M; Panggabean, T; Aritondang, D
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 3, No 2 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (493.391 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i2.101

Abstract

An experiment was conducted to determine the availability of P in defluorinated rock phosphate (DRP) and bone meal (TT) using a slope ratio assay (SRA) technique . Ten different diets were fed to 300 day-old broiler chicks for three weeks. Basal diet (RB) was formulated to contain 0.38% total P. DRP, TT and dicalcium phosphate (DCP) diets were each containing three different levels of total P: 0.45, 0.52 and 0.59%: At the end of the experiment, tibia bones were collected for ash determination. The availability of P was determined by SRA using tibia bone ash as the main parameter. The result indicated that the availability ofP in the DRP and TT were 83 .6 and 91 .3%, respectively .   Key words : Phosphorus availability, slope ratio assay, broiler
The resistance of Salmonella spp. isolates from Alabio duck against several antibiotics ., Istiana
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 3, No 2 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (457.613 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i2.102

Abstract

A total of 172 isolates of Salmonella spp. consisted of S. typhimurium (70), S. Radar (52), S. senftenberg (25), S. Virchow (14), and S. amsterdam (11) from Alabio duck hatcheries in the District of Hulu Sungai Utara, South Kalimantan, were examined their resistencies against seven kinds of antibiotics, consisted of chloramphenicol, neomycin, trimethoprim, streptomycin, tetracycline, ampicillin, and polymixin B, by using agar disc diffusion method. The results showed that 70 isolates of S. typhimurium were resistant against six kinds of antibiotics with various percentages, that is chlorampenicol 5 .7%, neomycin 12 .8%, trimethoprim 7.1 %, streptomycin 8 .6%, tetracycline 11 .4%, and the highest against ampicillin 30 %. Ofthe 52 S. hadar isolates showed that all ofthem were resistent against 6 kinds of antibiotics, that is chloramphenicol 1 .9%, neomycin 7.7%, trimethoprim 5.8%, streptomycin 48 .0%, tetracycline 48.0%, and polymixin B 3.8%. Futhermore S. senftenberg (25 isolates) were resistent against three kinds of antibiotics, that is neomycin 12%, streptomycin 20%, and tetracyclines 16%. Meanwhile S. virchow (14 isolates), were resistant against two kinds of antibiotics namely streptomycin 7.1% and tetracylines 14.3%. Whereas S. amsterdam (11 isolates) were resistant against four kinds of antibiotics, that is neomycin 45 .5%, streptomycin 18 .2%, tetracycline 18 .2%, and ampicillin 9.10%.   Key words: Resistance, Salmonella spp., Alabio ducks, antibiotics
The isolations of Toxoplasma gondii from diaphragm of a sheep having high antibody titre and faecal-soil of a cat Iskandar, Tolibin
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 3, No 2 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (875.739 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i2.103

Abstract

In relation to isolate Toxoplasma gondii from animals, 161 samples each of serums pairs and diaphragms were collected from 123 sheep and 38 goats from an abbatoir of Cibadak subdistrict, district of Sukabumi, and 30 faecal-soil samples of cats from some areas in district of Bogor. By using indirect haemagglutination (IHA) test serums were examined, and 60.16% and 39.47% of sheep and goats serums were found positive toxoplasmosis with antibody titres varied ranging from 1 :64 to 1 :8 .192 . Meanwhile, diaphragms of sheep and goats having antibody titres higher than 1 :2 .048 were extracted and the extracts were then passaged by innoculating into mice intraperitoneally . The results showed that cysts and tachyzoites of Toxoplasma were isolated from brain and peritoneal exudate ofmice respectively which were formerly innoculated by diaphragm extract of a sheep  having the highest (1 :8 .192) antibody titre. On the other hand, oocysts of Toxoplasma were also isolated from one out of 30 (3.33%) faecal-soil samples ofcats examined by floatation method.   Key words : Toxoplasmosis, Toxoplasma gondii, sheep, cysts, tachyzoites, faecal-soil, oocysts
Effects of supplement and anthelmintic treatments on parasite establishment and performance of lambs artificially infected with Haemonchus contortus Ginting, Simon P
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 3, No 2 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (749.695 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i2.104

Abstract

The effect of feeding supplement and anthelmintic treatments on the establishment of parasites and the performances of lambs was studied in 24 St . Croix x Local Sumatra Crosses infected with Haemonchus contortus larvae (L3) . The study consisted of a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement involving two levels of supplement (1 .6% and 0.5% body weight ) and two levels of larval infection (0 and 3,000 L3 initial dose followed by a 1,000 L3-weekly dose) .The supplement x infection interaction was significant (P< 0.0001) on the egg counts and total serum proteins, but not on the PCV values (P>0.10) . The interaction was resulted from the shift in the magnitude of difference between supplement or between infection level and not by the shift in the rank between treatments . The 1 .6% body weight (BW) group had lower (P<0.0001) mean egg count than the 0.5% BW group (1,588 vs. 7,880) . Consistently, the blood PCV value and total serum proteins of lambs receiving 1 .6% BW supplement were higher (P<0.0001) than the 0.5% BW supplement group (28 .3 vs . 23 .8 and 5 .2 vs . 4.6, respectively) . Infection resulted in decreased feed and nitrogen (N) intake, but had no effect on fecal-N (P>0.0001). N-excretion (fecal-N + Urine-N) was not altered (P>0.10) by Haemonchus infection, but N-retention decreased in infected lambs due to a reduction in N intake . The effect of supplement and Haemonchus infection was significant (P<0.0001) on daily gain . Lambs on the 1 .6% BW supplement group grew faster than on the 0.5% BW supplement group whether they were infected or not . Infected lamb receiving 0.5% BW supplement lost weight during the experiment . It is concluded that an approach that combines the use of anthelmintics and supplement could ameliorate the influence of gastro-intestinal parasites on the performances of lambs, and reduces the intensity of using anthelmintics in controlling the parasites .   Key words : Supplement, anthelmintics, Haemonchus contortus, lambs
The estimation of Lymnaea rubiginosa and other freshwater snails populations in the rice fields and pond in Bogor, West Java Widjajanti, S
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 3, No 2 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (524.688 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i2.105

Abstract

The effect of feeding supplement and anthelmintic treatments on the establishment of parasites and the performances of lambs was studied in 24 St . Croix x Local Sumatra Crosses infected with Haemonchus contortus larvae (L3) . The study consisted of a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement involving two levels of supplement (1 .6% and 0.5% body weight ) and two levels of larval infection (0 and 3,000 L3 initial dose followed by a 1,000 L3-weekly dose) .The supplement x infection interaction was significant (P< 0.0001) on the egg counts and total serum proteins, but not on the PCV values (P>0.10) . The interaction was resulted from the shift in the magnitude of difference between supplement or between infection level and not by the shift in the rank between treatments . The 1 .6% body weight (BW) group had lower (P<0.0001) mean egg count than the 0.5% BW group (1,588 vs. 7,880) . Consistently, the blood PCV value and total serum proteins of lambs receiving 1 .6% BW supplement were higher (P<0.0001) than the 0.5% BW supplement group (28 .3 vs . 23 .8 and 5 .2 vs . 4.6, respectively) . Infection resulted in decreased feed and nitrogen (N) intake, but had no effect on fecal-N (P>0.0001). N-excretion (fecal-N + Urine-N) was not altered (P>0.10) by Haemonchus infection, but N-retention decreased in infected lambs due to a reduction in N intake . The effect of supplement and Haemonchus infection was significant (P<0.0001) on daily gain . Lambs on the 1 .6% BW supplement group grew faster than on the 0.5% BW supplement group whether they were infected or not . Infected lamb receiving 0.5% BW supplement lost weight during the experiment . It is concluded that an approach that combines the use of anthelmintics and supplement could ameliorate the influence of gastro-intestinal parasites on the performances of lambs, and reduces the intensity of using anthelmintics in controlling the parasites .   Key words : Supplement, anthelmintics, Haemonchus contortus, lambs
Studies on the use ofEchinostoma revolutum larvae as an agent for biological control of Fasciola gigantica Estuningsih, Sarwitri Endah
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 3, No 2 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (584.556 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i2.106

Abstract

The use of Echinostoma revolutum larvae as an agent for biological control of Fasciola gigantica has been studied in the laboratory of Parasitology, Balitvet. Infection of Lymnaea rubiginosa with Echinostoma revolutum increased the growth and mortality rates of the snails and completely suppressed their egg production . These effects were attributed to a destruction of gonads and other organs of the snails by echinostome rediae, production of which commenced during the second week after the infection. From laboratory studies with L. rubiginosa, there was an evidence of strong antagonism between larvae of E. revolutum and larvae of F. gigantica. Concurrent infection of L. rubiginosa with miracidia of F. gigantica and E. Revolutum resulted in that all snails were infected with E. revolutum only, when they were dissected 30 days later. In contrast, 94% of the snails which were exposed to miracidia of F. gigantica only, were infected with larvae of this species after 30 days . When L. rubiginosa were infected with F. gigantica 20 days previously were exposed to infection with E. revolutum and examined 30 days later, it was found that 77% of the snails had a single infection with E. revolutum, 16 % were infected with F. Gigantica only, and the remaining 7% had common infection. It was concluded that the dominant antagonism of E. revolutum over F. gigantica in L. rubiginosa and the reduction of fecundity and longevity ofsnails infected with E. revolutum could be useful for biological control of F. gigantica.   Key. words: Echinostoma revolutum, Fasciola gigantica, biological control, ducks, chickens

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