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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 19 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 3, No 1 (1998)" : 19 Documents clear
Comparative advantage and sensitivity analysis of dairy farms by development patterns in West Java Rachman, Benny
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 3, No 1 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (747.925 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i1.86

Abstract

The study is aimed at analyzing feasibility of the dairy farm on several development scheme. Domestic resource cost (DRC) analysis is used to understand problems in dairy farms. The study was carried out during August to December 1994 in Bandung and Bogor regencies of West Java . The result of this study indicates that the milk production produced by credit pattern, recommendation pattern and farm group pattern namely, 3,800 liter/ut/year, 4,422 liter/ut/year and 4,270 liter/ut/year, respectively, and also the international market price is Rp. 375/liter tend to be efficient. This phenomena is characterized by coefficient of DRC <1 .0 . Nevertheless, in term of dairy farm development should be based on several aspects such as, economics of scale and scheme of dairy farm. Moreover, farm group pattern (PPK) is more relatively efficient than the others.   Keyword : Domestic resource cost (DRC), credit pattern, recommendation pattern, group pattern
Growth response of Kampung and Pelung cross chickens to diet differed in protein content Iskandar, Sofjan; Z, Desmayati; Sastrodihardi, S; Sartika, T; Setiadi, P; Susanti, T
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 3, No 1 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (718.638 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i1.87

Abstract

Two lines of native chicken (Kampung and Pelung cross) were subjected to diets differed in protein content (21, 19, 17and 15%), but isocaloric (2,900 kcal ME/kg). Ten (5 males, 5 females) day old chicks were allocated as replicate and thetreatments were 2 lines x 4 levels dietary protein. The trial was conducted for 12 weeks period . Bodyweight gain of Kampungchicken (704 g/bird) was lower than ofPelung cross chicken (844 g/bird). Based on bodyweight gain and feed conversion ratio,the optimum level of dietary crude protein was 19% for both lines, whilst consumption was not affected either by lines nor bydietary protein. Pelung cross chicken converted feed to body weight more efficiently than Kampung chicken did. However feedconversion ratio increased with decreasing in dietary protein. Mortality was not affected either by lines nor by dietary protein.Twelve weeks carcass percentage of Pelung cross (64,9%) was higher than of Kampung chickens (62,9%), however carcass percentage was not affected by the dietary protein. Abdominal fat pad was not affected by lines of chickens nor dietary protein.   Key words : Native chicken, protein, growth, carcass
Nutritive value of fermented coconut meal in ration of laying ducks with various phosphorous levels Sinurat, A.P; Purwadaria, T; Habiebie, A; Pasaribu, T; Hamid, H; Rosida, J; Haryati, T; Sutikno, I
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 3, No 1 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (697.545 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i1.88

Abstract

A series of experiment was conducted to improve the utilization of coconut meal in poultry ration . A bioprocess (fermentation) approach was adopted. Coconut meal was fermented followed by an enzymatic process at room temperature or 50 OC.The nutritive value of the fermented products was determined chemically. Product with the highest nutritive value was then used for a feeding trial to study the interaction effect between dietary levels of fermented coconut meal and phosphorous level on the performances of laying ducks. Nine experimental diets were formulated, i.e ., the factorial of 3 levels of fermented coconut meal (0, 30 and 40%) and 3 levels of total phosphorous (0.6, 0.8 and 1 .0%) . The diet was fed to pullet ducks and the performances of the ducks were observed for 16 weeks of production period. The results showed that the nutritive value of coconut meal increased by fermentation and the highest yield was achieved when the enzymatic process was performed at 500C. There was no significant interaction effect between dietary fermented coconut meal levels and the phosphorous levels on all parameters observed, except on egg weight. Inclusion of fermented coconut meal in the ration up to 30% did not produce negative effects on the productivity oflaying ducks, however, higher levels (40%) ofinclusion reduced the egg size   Keywords: Coconut meal, fermentation, ducks, egg production
Effects of the addition of hormone in maturation medium for in vitro production ofembryo (IVP). Situmorang, Polmer; Triwulanningsih, Endang; Lubis, Adriana; Hidayati, Nurhasanah; Sugiarti, Tatit
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 3, No 1 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (581.304 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i1.89

Abstract

A study on the effects of hormone FSH, hCG and estrogen in maturation medium on embryo production (IVP) was conducted. Ovaries of dairy cows were obtained from slaughtered house and oocytes were collected by aspiration and slicing. Oocytes were matured in TCM-199 media containing one of each hormonal treatments : 10 ug/ml FSH, 2 IU hCG, 1 ug/ml estrogen, 10 ug/ml FSH + 2 IU hCG, 10 ug/ml FSH + 1 ug/ml estrogen, and 10 ug/ml FSH + 2 IU hCG + 1 ug/ml estrogen for 24 hours. Fertilization was conducted in thyroid albumin lactate pyruvate (TALP) media containing 10 ug/ml heparin for 18-24 hours and co-cultured in synthetic oviduct fluid (Sof-media) using C02 incubator at 38oC. Every 48 hours the embryos were moved into fresh Sofmedia and embryo evaluation was done on day 7using a microscope . From a total of 293 oocytes studied resulted 60.4% of zygotes which develop to 9.4% young embryos ( cell numbers <16), 45.3% morulae and 5,7% blastocysts. Hormones used singly did not significantly affect the production of embryo . The highest mean percentages of fertilization wasobtained in FSH (73.3%) and the lowest in estrogen (59.6%), but the mean percentage of blastocyst was higher in estrogen . The mean percentages of young embryos, morulae and blastocysts were 4.8, 66.1, 2.4 ; 18 .8, 41 .6, 6.6 and 3 .3, 46.6, 10 .0 for FSH, hCG and estrogen, respectively . Using a combination of FSH with hCG and estrogen did not significantly increase the production of embryo . The mean percentages of fertilization, young embryo, morulae and blastocysts were 55.2, 9.3, 43.4 and 2.6 ; 51 .7, 4.8, 35.8 and 11 .1 and 56 .0, 12 .3, 42.3 and 1 .4 for FSH+hCG, FSH+estrogen and FSH+hCG+estrogen respectively .   Keywords: Embryo, fertilization, hormone, in vitro
The application of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K99, F41 polyvalent vaccine in pregnant dairy cattle to control neonatal colibacillosis and mortality of calves ., Supar; ., Kusmiyati; Poerwadikarta, B
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 3, No 1 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (726.224 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i1.90

Abstract

Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains possessing either K99, F41 or K99F41 are responsible for causing neonatal diarrhoea and mortality of calves and difficult to control using antimicrobial drugs. A whole cell ETEC vaccine containing fimbrial antigens of polyvalent strains based on field serotypes was produced . The efficacy of ETEC vaccine used to control neonatal colibacillosis of dairy calves was studied in experimental animals and field trials. Five pregnant dairy cow were used for experimental study. Three animals were injected subcutaneously with 5 ml vaccine at 6 weeks and again 2 weeks before expected date of calving, others were left unvaccinated as control. Two calves born from vaccinated cows were given colostrum and milk from their own mothers. A calf born from vaccinated cow was not given colostrum, but milk from other vaccinated cow at day 8 . Three day old calves receiving colostrum of vaccinated cows were challenged with 2 ml either ETEC K99 or F41 suspension containing 108 colony forming units per ml did not show clinical signs of diarrhoea and their body weight increased progressively. Whereas, a calf born from unvaccinated group was challenged with ETEC K99 developed clinical sign of diarrhoea at 15 hours later and died at 8 days post-inoculation . A calf born from unvaccinated cow was challenged with ETEC F41 developed watery diarrhoea, it did not die, but its body weight relatively did not increase. The use of two doses ofpolyvalent ETEC vaccine at late gestation gave protection to the suckling offspring against challenged . Under farm conditions, dams vaccination with 2 doses of polyvalent ETEC vaccine 6 week and 2 weeks before expected date of calving reduced the calf mortality from average of 13% per months to 0.7%. It was concluded that dams vaccination with polyvalent ETEC containing K99 and F41 fimbrial antigens gave protection to their suckling offsprings or through consuming their colostrum or milk against homologous ETEC infection.   Keywords: Calf, colibacillosis, ETEC, dams vaccination
Protein profiles of field isolates ofBacillus anthracis from different endemic areas of Indonesia Poerwadikarta, M Bhakti
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 3, No 1 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (417.276 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i1.91

Abstract

Sonicated cell-free extract proteins of 14 field isolates ofBacillus anthracis from six different endemic areas of Indonesia were analyzed by the use of sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) methods . The protein profiles of each field isolate tested demonstrated slightly different at the protein bands with molecular weights of 18, 37, 52, 65 and 70 kDa, and varied between the field isolates and vaccine strains. The variation could provide clues to the source of anthrax transmission whether it was originated from similar strain or not.   Key words : Protein profiles, Bacillus anthracis, SDS-PAGE
The pattern of anthrax cases on livestock in West Nusa Tenggara Province ., Enymartindah; Wahyuwardani, S
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 3, No 1 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (681.031 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i1.92

Abstract

A retrospective study on anthrax in endemic area was carried out from 1984 to 1994 in West Nusa Tenggara Province (NTB) to uncover the occurrence of anthrax and the pattern of the disease in livestock. Data of anthrax incidence had been compiled for the 11 years from Animal Health Section and Type B Laboratory of the Livestock Service Office, NTB Province in Mataram. This was done to get the information about locations and times when the cases occurred, and the vaccination status of livestock in the anthrax area. The pattern of anthrax in livestock was analyzed by using time series analysis, and the long term trend was then illustrated by linier regression . During the years, anthrax cases in livestock were reported high in Sumbawa island, while the cases in Lombok island were relatively low. There were no anthrax cases reported from East Lombok District . The long term trend of anthrax occurrence in livestock from 1984 to 1994 tended to decrease (Y= 6,04 - 0,0162 X).   Keywords: Anthrax, cases pattern, retrospective study
Sensitivity of some local isolates of Mycoplasma gallisepticum against antibiotics Wahyuwardani, Sutiastuti; ., Soeripto
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 3, No 1 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (494.956 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i1.93

Abstract

Sensitivity of five local isolates ofMycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) strain and two standard MG isolates obtained from Australia were tested against antibiotics of oxytetracycline, doxycycline, erythromycin, bacitracin, vancomycin, methicillin and penicillin using antibiogram disc method. The result showed that one, 2 and 3 local MG isolates were resistent to doxycycline, erythromycin and oxytetracycline respectively . MG isolate of ADA7 from Australia was found to be resistent to all antibiotics tested. None ofthe local MG isolates were sensitive against bacitracin, vancomycin, methicillin and penicillin.   Key words: Mycoplasma gallisepticum, antibiogram disc
The competitive interaction of snails Thiara scabra and Physa doopi on the snail Lymnaea rubiginosa under laboratory conditions Estuningsih, Sarwitri Endah
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 3, No 1 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (517.28 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i1.94

Abstract

The competitive interaction of the snails Thiara scabra and Physa doopi against the snail Lymnaea rubiginosa, the intermediate host ofFasciola gigantica has been studied. Aquaria, 60 x 40 x 20 cm and 30 x 20 x 10 cm in size were used, and the two snail species were introduced in different proportion . The results over a one year period showed that the competition between snail L. rubiginosa and T. scabra or P. doopi has started after 8 months as demonstrated by the reduction of the population ofL. rubiginosa and increasing the population of T. scabra or P. doopi. The competitive interaction does not seem to be due to competition for food but to a chemical factors, possibly water-soluble pheromones. The other explanation is discussed .   Keywords : Snail, intermediate host, Limnaea rubiginosa, Thiara scabra, Physa doopi, Fasciola gigantica, competitive Interaction
The susceptibility differences of buffalo and Ongole calves against trickle infection with Fasciola gigantica Wiedosari, Ening; Widjajanti, S; Partoutomo, S
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 3, No 1 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (597.133 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i1.95

Abstract

A pen trial was carried out in order to determine the susceptibility differences of a trickle infection with Fasciola gigantica in buffalo and Ongole calves. Treated animals were infected orally with 15 metacercariae of F. gigantica twice weekly for 32 weeks and were slaughtered at 36 weeks. The results showed that buffalo calves had significantly lower fluke burdens than Ongole calves (P<0 .01) . All of the infected Ongole calves had fasciola eggs in their faeces 18 weeks after the commencement of infection. In contrast, eggs were detected only in 3 out of 7 infected buffalo calves at week 20, in 4 at week 28 and in 6 at week 30. Faeces of the seventh buffalo remained free of eggs until week 36. Rates of growth were reduced by 25%and 10,3% in infected Ongole and buffalo calves respectively . Circulating blood eosinophilia ofboth hosts, ahallmark of helminth infections, increased following infection, but values in buffaloes was greater than Ongole calves mainly in week 4 and 8 after infection (P<0.01). These results might be concluded that the susceptibility of buffalo calves to trickle infection with F. gigantica was lower compared to Ongole calves.   Keywords : Fasciola gigantica; susceptibility, buffalo calves, Ongole calves

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