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Contact Name
Ahmadi Riyanto
Contact Email
medpub@litbang.deptan.go.id
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ahmadi_puslitbangnak@yahoo.com
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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 6 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 22, No 3 (2017): SEPTEMBER 2017" : 6 Documents clear
Cytokines profile of mice infected by high and low virulences of Indonesian T. evansi isolates Sawitri, Dyah Haryuningtyas; Wardhana, April Hari; Wibowo, Heri
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 22, No 3 (2017): SEPTEMBER 2017
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (531.049 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v22i3.1666

Abstract

Surra in livestock is caused by Trypanosoma evansi, a homoflagella blood protozoa that circulate in extracellular. This disease is widespread in Asia, Africa, South and Central America. According to the immunological aspect, the severity of surra in livestock and mice which infected by trypanosoma is associated with an inflammatory response. On the other hand, the survival time of mice depends on the regulation of Th1 synthesis and proinflammatory cytokines such as IFN-γ and TNF-α. The aim of this study was to observe the responses of proinflammatory cytokines IFN γ, TNF-α and anti-inflammatory IL-10 which result from interaction with parasites. This information is needed for improvements in the management of prevention of Surra in animals. A total of 30 mice were divided into 3 groups. The group was infected with a low virulency T. evansi (Pml287); high virulence (Bang87) respectively and one group was not infected as control. Mice sera were collected in every 4 days for cytokine measurement using an Enzyme Link-Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). The result showed a difference response of proinflammatory and antiinflammation cytokine profile between the infected mice by isolates Bang 87 and Pml 287. Early deaths in mice infected by Bang 87 isolate were suspected as a result of the response of systemic inflammation syndromes characterized by elevated IFN-γ levels that were not adequately compensated by anti-inflammatory. Anemia contributes to the cause of death in mice that support multiple organ failures (multiple organ disfunction).
Improvement of nutritional value of cocoa pod husk fermented with Aspergillus Spp. and two levels of urea and ammonium sulphate Rakhmani, Susana IW; Purwadaria, T
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 22, No 3 (2017): SEPTEMBER 2017
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (495.345 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v22i3.1670

Abstract

Cocoa pod husk is abundant as a waste product of cocoa plantation and potential as feed ingredient but has low nutritional value. To increase the nutritive value of cocoa pod husk (CPH), biological process through solid substrate fermentation using Aspergillus oryzae and Aspergillus niger and addition of two doses (N1 and N2) of nitrogen mixture had been done. The product is Fermented Cocoa Pod Husk (FCPH). Protein content increased from 50 g/kg before fermentation to 133.8 g. kg-1 for N1 for A. niger and 150 g/kg using A. oryzae. True protein were 99.8 and 93.5 g/kg for N1 and N2 treatments (A. niger); 119 and 104.1 g/kg for N1 and N2 treatments (A. oryzae). Aspergillus niger showed a superiority in term of enzymes production when compared to Aspergillus oryzae. Mannanase activy in A. niger fermentation product with N1 dose reached up to 2654 U/g and A.oryzae  was 1122 U/g. Dry matter and protein digestibility for A. niger FCPH were 47 and 57% and A. oryzae FCPH were 52 and 62% repectively. Fermentation processed of CPH yield a product that very potential as an alternative feed with higher in protein content and contain mannanase enzyme.
Evaluation of four pasture legumes species as forages and cover crops in oil palm plantation Hutasoit, Rijanto; Sirait, Juniar; Tarigan, Andi; Ratih, D. H.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 22, No 3 (2017): SEPTEMBER 2017
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (349.547 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v22i3.1801

Abstract

Pasture legumes is a very high quality of forage. The limited land is the problem of its development. Integration with oil palm plantations is one of the potentials for its development. This study was aimed to investigate the productivity of several legumes (Arachis glabrata, Stylosanthes guianensis, Clitoria ternatea, and Chamaecrista rotundifolia) as forages and cover crop. The potential tests were conducted in oil palm area of 4608 m2, in a complete block design with four treatments (legume species) and three replications. Parameters observed were: Legum production, leaf/stem ratio, chemical composition of legume, concentration of N, P in the soil, microbes in the soil, leguminous digestibility and palm fruit production. Results showed that the highest legume production (DM) was (P<0.05) in the species of Clitoria ternatea (16.15 tons ha-1year-1), the highest leaf/stem ratio (P<0.05) was in the Arachis glabrata (2.09). The chemical composition (DM) did not differ (P>0.05) ranged from 33.75 to 35.75%, the organic matter (OM) varied greatly (P<0.05) the highets was in Clitoria ternatea. The highest Crude protein (P<0.05) was in Clitoria ternatea 17.84%. NDF concentrations did not differ (P>0.05). The lowest ADF concentration (P<0.05) was in Chamaecrista rotundifolia. The concentration of N in the soil indicated that early year of activity was similar (average 0.10%), at the end of activity increased (P<0.05) in treatment Stylosanthes guianensis (0.16%). The highest population of N-fixation bacteria of 1.76x109 and phosphate solvent of 9.8x105 were in the treatment of Clitoria ternatea. Production of fresh fruit bunches of the palm was relatively similar (P>0.05) ranged from 16.52-19.21 tons ha-1year-1. It is concluded that Clitoria ternatea is the best species of legume tested as forage and cover crop in oil palm plantations.
Physical quality and digestibility in vitro determination of green pellet concentrate based on Indigofera zollingeriana Tarigan, Andi; Ginting, Simon P.; Arief, I. I.; Astuti, D. A.; Abdullah, L.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 22, No 3 (2017): SEPTEMBER 2017
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (387.947 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v22i3.1651

Abstract

This study aims to determine the physical quality and digestibility of green pellet concentrate based on I. zollingeriana. The composition of green pellet concentrate feed contains I. zollingeriana and C. calothyrsus in the following combinations: 1) I. zollingeriana /C. calothyrsus (90/0; R0), 2) I. zollingeriana/C. calothyrsus (75/15; R1), 3) I. zollingeriana/C. calothyrsus (60/30; R2) and 4) I. zollingeriana / C. calothyrsus (45/45; R3). The physical quality study of green pellet concentrate was performed using a completely randomized design with four types of green concentrate as treatments of three replications. Green pellet concentrate studies conducted in vitro rumen fermentation were performed using in a  randomized block design with four treatments and three sources of liquid rumen as a block. The results of the experiments conducted with pellet criteria containing I. zollingeriana/C. calothyrsus composition (60/30; R2) have the best physical character (water activity = 0.58; particles size = 12.69 mm; degree value angles = 21.01o; collision endurance = 99.78%; endurance friction = 90.42 %; bulk density = 590 kg/m3) compared to the other treatments. The quality of diet based on digestibility in vitro, dry matter and organic material having a pattern equal to R0 is higher (P<0.05) compared with other treatments, while the rough digestibility of In Vitro protein is seen R0, R1, and R2 (P>0.05), but (P<0.05) was higher than the treatment of R3. There was no difference of pH and total bacteria on green pellet concentrate type. The treatment of R3 has the lowest NH3, VFA and total gas concentration (P<0.5) compared with R2, R1 and R0. It was concluded that concentrate green pellet of I. zollingeriana composition (60%) and C.calothyrsus (30%) had better physical and nutritional quality.
Evaluation on performance of some Sorghum bicolor cultivars as forage resources in the dry land with dry climate ., Sajimin; Purwantari, Nurhayati D.; ., Sarjiman; ., Sihono
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 22, No 3 (2017): SEPTEMBER 2017
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (283.881 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v22i3.1611

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of several Sorghum bicolor cultivars as forage on a dry land with pH of 5.4, N of 0.08%;  C/N of 9%, P of 0.06% and K of 0.01%. Nine cultivars of S. bicolor (Super 1, Super 2, Numbu, Kawali, G2, G5, PAC 537, PAC 593 and PAC 501) were evaluated. Plot size was 16 m2 with space planting of 15 x 75 cm. The experimental design used was randomized block design with three replications.  Parameters observed were plant height, time of flowering, forage production and quality. The result showed that the primary plant growth was not different in all cultivars. In the 65 days old primary plant,  the Super 2, PAC 537 and Kawali had no flower yet. Biomass production varied in primary plant between cultivars of 11.35 - 26.17 kg/16 m2. The highest biomass production was obtained in PAC 537 of 26.17 kg/16 m2 (16.34 t/ha) which were significantly higher than G2 of 11.35 kg/16 m2 (7.09 ton/ha) and was not significantly different with other cultivars. In the 45 days ratoon I, Super 2, G5 and Super 1 showed faster growth. Biomass production increased in the ratoon I around 19.88 kg/16 m2 (12.42 ton/ha). PAC 537 produced the highest biomass of 30.14 kg/16 m2 (18.84 ton/ha) and was not significantly different with other cultivars, except with the G2. Biomass production of ratoon II decreased around 1.83 kg/16 m2 (1.14 t/ha)–4.77 kg/16 m2 (2.98 t/ha) and increased in the ratoon III of 15.72 kg/16 m2 (9.82 t/ha)–26.05 kg/16 m2 (16.28 t/ha). The quality of forage ratoon I was better compared to the primary plant with the lowest one was in ratoon II. It could be concluded that Super 1, Super 2 and PAC 537 cultivars might be recommended as potential forage.
Primordial germ cells profiles incubated for 24 hours in phosphate buffer saline [-] solution Kostaman, Tatan; Sopiyana, Soni
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 22, No 3 (2017): SEPTEMBER 2017
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (425.336 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v22i3.1802

Abstract

Gonadal development is a sequential process that can be divided into three major events: the PGCs migration, sex determination and gonadal differentiation. This study was aimed to see the development of PGCs isolated from the gonads of embryos after being incubated for 7 days and then was incubated using a solution of Phosphate Buffer Saline (PBS) [-]. The developing gonad can be isolated from 7 days old chick and can be incubated at a temperature of 37.8oC in a solution of PBS [-]: without Ca2+ and Mg2+. The release of gonadal PGC was observed within 1, 8, 16, and 24 hours after the embryonic gonad was placed in a PBS solution [-]. The results showed that PGCs can be separated from gonadal tissues and can be collected by entering the developing gonad to the PBS [-] solution. The highest percentage of PGCs and survival rate was obtained after gonad was incubated for 1 hour and was not different with 8 hours (P>0.05). Those result was significantly different (P<0.05) with the 16 and 24 hours incubation. The highest purity rate percentage was in the 8 hours incubation, but did not show a significant difference (P>0.05) with the 1 and 16 hours incubation. The percentage of the purity differed (P<0.05) after the 24 hours incubation. It can be concluded that the most appropriate incubation time to obtain PGCs from the KUB chicken embryonic gonad is no more than 8 hours.

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