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Contact Name
Ahmadi Riyanto
Contact Email
medpub@litbang.deptan.go.id
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ahmadi_puslitbangnak@yahoo.com
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Jawa barat
INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 6 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 22, No 1 (2017): MARCH 2017" : 6 Documents clear
Path analysis of exogenous variables against technology adoption levels of dairy cattle in West Sumatera Herawati, Tati; Priyanto, Dwi
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 22, No 1 (2017): MARCH 2017
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (207.5 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v22i1.1603

Abstract

Path analysis of the regression equation can be used to see the direct and also indirect influence of some exogenous variables against endogenous variables. The rate of feed technology adoption as an endogenous variables can be directly or indirectly influenced by some exogenous variables. The purpose of this research was to test multiple exogenous characteristics variables of dairy cows farms against the feed technology adoption rate as endogenous variables, through path analysis. Research conducted in the city of Padang Panjang, West Sumatra in particular farmer group of dairy cattle in 2016. Endogenous variable is the level of adoption of feed technology (Z). Whereas the exogenous variables are the level of education (X1), the age of farmer (X3), the amount of cows lactation (X2), farm scale (Y1) and milk production (Y2). The last two variables are variables which are bridging the influence indirectly. Obtained results showed that only X3 which directly influenced Z, with a value of ρZx3 = 0.834 and P = 0.018. Other variables X1 and X2 partly significantly influenced Y1 and X2 significantly influenced Y2 with value of path coefficient in successively ρy1x1 = 0.133 and P = 0.040; ρy1x2 = 0.982 and P = 0.000; ρy2x2 = 0.841 and P = 0.008. Therefore, there was no special model of causal relationships between the empirical variables X and Y against Z, except the X3 which had structure model Z = ρZx3 X3 + ρZε2 = 0.834 X3 + 0.217 ε2. It was concluded that the age strongly influenced the feeding technology adoption. The older the age of farmers, the more difficult for adopting recommended technology.
Production performance of HyCole, New Zealand White Rabbits and its reciprocal Brahmantiyo, Bram; Raharjo, Yono C.; Prasetyo, L. H.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 22, No 1 (2017): MARCH 2017
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (182.443 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v22i1.1590

Abstract

New Zealand White rabbits (NZW) has been known as broiler rabbit that has been well adapted in Indonesia. HyCole rabbits were imported from France that were selected for high reproduction and growth rate. This study was aimed to evaluate the productivity of HyCole and New Zealand White rabbits and their reciprocal as the basis to develop broiler rabbit which adaptive to tropical climate. Forty heads of doe (PBPB) and 17 heads of buck (PAPA) of HyCole rabbit, and 30 heads of doe and 6 heads of buck of New Zealand White rabbits (NN) were used. The ration was given according to IRIAP standard ration (18 % CP, 2500 kcal ME/kg and 14 % CF). The diet was provided in the morning and the evening, and drinking water was provided ad libitum. Reproductive performance of does (litter size at birth, litter size at wean, mortality and weekly does body weight) and the kit’s growth performance (weekly body weight from weaning until the age of 20 weeks) were evaluated. Data were analyzed using the SAS program (SAS 2001). Rabbits growth data were periodically analyzed by Gompertz model (Blasco & Gomez 1993). HyCole rabbit which was bred in Indonesia had production performance better than NZW rabbit and PAN crossbred (HyCole bucks x NZW does) had the potential to be bred as superior rabbit adaptive to tropical climate because they had hybrid vigor of the number of litter size at birth and kit’s growth rate.
Effectiveness of DMSO concentration on recovery rate and viability of primordial germ cell of Gaok chicken Kostaman, Tatan; Yusuf, Tuti L.; Fachrudin, M.; Setiadi, M. A.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 22, No 1 (2017): MARCH 2017
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (243.769 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v22i1.1799

Abstract

Recent technological developments to produce germ line chimeras with primordial germ cell (PGC) transfer into the recipient embryo provide an opportunity to conserve and retrieval of chicken genetic resources in complete form. The study was conducted to obtain the most effective DMSO percentage to recovery rate and viability of Gaok chicken PGC after freezing which will later be feasible to be transferred. In this study, the eggs of Gaok chicken were incubated for about 2.5 - 3 days to obtain embryos at stages 14 - 16. Blood retrieval was done through the dorsal aorta using micropipettes under microscope. The procedure of PGC isolation of Gaok chicken with centrifugation gradient was using nycodenz as a substance. Commercially available cryoprotectants (dimethyl sulfoxide = DMSO) were used for PGC freezing. Isolated and frozen PGCs of Gaok chicken were diluted with cryoprotectants containing 2.5; 5 and 10% DMSO in fetal bovine serum (FBS). The recovery rate of 2.5; 5 and 10% DMSO concentration were 36.4; 48.2 and 48 % respectively. The viability of PGC after freezing was significantly higher for 5% DMSO compared with 2.5% DMSO (P<0.05), but not different from 10% DMSO. It can be concluded that the concentration DMSO of 5 % was effectve contration in freezing Gaok chicken PGC.
Weight estimation of empty carcass and carcass cuts weight of female SenSi-1 Agrinak chicken Hidayat, Cecep; Iskandar, Sofjan
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 22, No 1 (2017): MARCH 2017
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (165.799 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v22i1.1626

Abstract

SenSi-1 Agrinak chicken is Indonesian local chicken that was selected for growth rate for six generations. The aim of this study was to estimate of carcass weight and carcass cuts of female SenSi-1 Agrinak chicken, based on age and live weight. The chicks were reared intensively in colony wire cages and they were slaughtered with Islamic method when they reached age of 5, 8 and 15 weeks. Empty carcass and carcass cuts were weight in fresh.  Data were analyzed using correlation and regression analysis method. Results showed that the live weight had a high positive correlation to carcass weight and carcass cuts weight of female SenSi-1 Agrinak chickens aged 5, 8 and 15 weeks. Estimation of live weight, carcass, carcass cuts, gizzard, liver and abdominal fat of female SenSi-1 Agrinak, using mathematical model, showed small value differences (0.09 - 4.43%) from the actual data. It was concluded that female SenSi-1 Agrinak chicken’s carcass weight and carcass cuts, could be estimated based on of age in days and live-body weight in gram without slaughtering.
Genetic variability of ESAG6/7 gene Trypanosoma evansi Sawitri, Dyah Haryuningtyas; Wardhana, April H.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 22, No 1 (2017): MARCH 2017
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (387.524 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v22i1.1638

Abstract

Trypanosoma evansi as an agent of Surra is one of the crucial parasitic diseases that cause great economic losses in Indonesia. These parasites need iron for growth and propagation phase which is obtained by receptor-mediated uptake of host transferin. The transferrin receptors are encoded by Expression Site Associated Genees (ESAGs). ESAG6/7 encodes transferrin receptors which reported have different affinities of a different host. The distinction of T. evansi pathogenicity is supposed to cause variability in the ESAG6/7 gene. This research was aimed to investigate the variability of genes ESAG6/7 T. evansi with different virulence in mice. This research was conducted in two steps: bioassay pathogeneicity in mice and analysis of ESAG6/7 gene sequences. The median survival time of mice was investigated after each group of mice infected by 25 T. evansi isolates from buffaloes where its geographically differ. The test results showed a difference of pathogenic virulence on 25 T. evansi isolates in mice. Sequence analysis of the ESAG6/7 gene from 25 T. evansi isolates origin from Indonesia tended to be homogeneous on the transferrin binding site but there was variability in the hypervariable site. These changes are able to separate high and low virulence of the T. evansi isolates. Phylogenetic tree analysis was formed 11 clades of 25 T. evansi. High virulence T. evansi was included in clades 7 and 10, while low virulence T. evansi was included in clade 5 and 11 and the moderate virulence was divided into those four clades.
Performance of EPMp broiler ducks feed with various levels of dietary lysine up to 10 weeks of age Purba, Maijon; Sinurat, Arnold P.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 22, No 1 (2017): MARCH 2017
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (108.591 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v22i1.1606

Abstract

Determining the optimum level of lysine in the ration will be a significant effort to avoid poor growth in duck husbandry. The purpose of this study was to determine the optimum dietary lysine requirement for EPMp broiler ducks, raised up to 10 weeks of age. The study was designed in a completely randomized design (CRD) with 4 dietary treatments, and 4 replicates. Each replicate consisted of 10 ducks. The 4 treatments were diets, containing lysine: 0.60% (T1); 0.70% (T2); 0.80% (T3) and 0.90% (T4). Variables measured included: feed consumption, body weight gain, feed conversion ratio (FCR), carcass and carcass cuts percentages. The results showed that the performance of 10 weeks of age EPMp broiler duck was significantly affected by the level of dietary lysine (P<0.05). The average body weight gain and the FCR of the duck were significantly affected (P<0.05) by dietary lysine level, but not for feed consumption and percentage of carcass (P>0.05). The average body weight gain of EPMp duck with T4 treatment (0.90% lysine) was significantly higher than that T1 (0.60% lysine) but did not significantly difference (P>0.05) with T2 and T3. The average FCR of EPMp duck under T3 and T4 were significantly (P<0.05) higher than that of EPMp duck under T1. It was concluded that the optimum dietary lysine to produce maximum body weight gain of EPMp duck raised up to 10 weeks of age was 0.70%, while for minimum FCR were at the level of 0.80% and 0.90%.

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