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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
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Articles 11 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 21, No 2 (2016): JUNE 2016" : 11 Documents clear
In Vitro rumen fermentation characteristics and microbes of thin tail sheep given sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L) biomass Sudarman, Asep; Hayashida, Maki; Miralestari, Mugi
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 21, No 2 (2016): JUNE 2016
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v21i2.1391

Abstract

Sweet potato plant is produced  in Indonesia in large quantities. Sweet potato leaves and stems can be used as a source of protein and the tuber can be used as an energy source. This study aimed to analyze the effect of feeding of sweet potato biomass on the rumen fermentation characteristics, digestibility of dry matter and organic matter as well as rumen microbial population of thin tail sheep. This study used a randomized block design by applying four feed treatments, i.e., T0 (100% napier grass), T1 (70% of napier grass + 30% concentrate), T2 (50% of napier grass + 50% sweet potato leaves), and T3 (70% sweet potato leaves + 30% sweet potato tuber) with three replicates. Rumen fluid samples were taken with stomach tube method using a vacuum pump.  The results showed that the T3 diet has higher (P<0.05) digestibility of dry matter and organic matter,  concentrations of NH3 and VFA,  and rumen bacterial population than those of T0 and T1diets but similar to that of T2 diet.  Rumen pH and protozoa population was not different among the treatments.   It can be concluded that the use of sweet potato biomass can improve the quality of rumen fermentation of sheep. Key words: Digestibility, Fermentation, Rumen, Sheep, Sweet Potato Biomass
Histological changes of liver tissues and serobiochemical relation in does with pregnancy ketosis Azmi, Amirul Faiz Mohd; Ghani, A.A.A.; Saadan, A. S.; Mokrish, A.; Lai, K. S.; Zamri-Saad, M.; Zuki, A. B.; Hassim, H. A.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 21, No 2 (2016): JUNE 2016
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v21i2.1392.x

Abstract

The histological changes of the liver in does with pregnancy ketosis were characterized. Twenty pregnant does at day 80 of pregnancy were used for this experiment. A total of 10 does were fed on grass (napier) and goat concentrate with water ad libitum consider as healthy pregnant goat, and another 10 ten were showed clinical and subclinical signs of ketosis consider as unhealthy pregnant doe. Liver biopsies were performed when clinical signs appear. Beta-Hydroxybutyrate (BHBA), free fatty acid (FFA), and glucose were dosed. Histological preparation revealed similar incidence and intensity of mild liver steatosis with lower cellular vacuolation in hepatocyte presence in healthy late pregnant does. Almost all of pregnant does with ketosis state (n=8/10) had large amount of small lipid droplets in almost every hepatocyte over the whole liver acinus with higher number of cellular vacuolation, and related with higher BHBA and FFA levels while low in glucose levels.Key Words: Beta-Hydroxybutyrate, Does, Free Fatty Acid, Liver Biopsies, Pregnancy Ketosis
Methane emission factors for enteric fermentation in beef cattle using IPCC Tier-2 method in Indonesia Widiawati, Yeni; Rofiq, M.N.; Tiesnamurti, B.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 21, No 2 (2016): JUNE 2016
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (379.8 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v21i2.1358

Abstract

Methane emission from enteric is a sub-category considered under the Agriculture sector greenhouse gas emissions by UNFCCC, thus Indonesia developed calculation on enteric CH4 EF for ruminant using Tier-2 method as country-specific emission factors (EF). Indonesia has huge amount of beef cattle population, which contributes significant amount to national enteric methane emission. The aim of this study was to estimate enteric methane EF for beef cattle in Indonesia using IPCC Tier-2 method.  The EF generated from this study is then used to estimate the methane emitted from beef cattle. Data on beef cattle population was obtained from BPS, data on energy content of feed, feed intake and digestibility were compiled from laboratory analysis and published paper. Equations were adopted and followed the instruction of IPCC 2006. Local cattle has different CH4 EF among each sub-category, which are  ranging from 18.18 to 55.89 Kg head-1 yr-1, with the average of 36.75  head-1 yr-1. Imported beef cattle has lower  CH4 EF (25.49 kg head-1 yr-1) than the average for local beef cattle. Overall, the national CH4 EF of beef cattle calculated by using IPCC Tier-2 method in Indonesia is 33.14 head-1 yr-1. The value is lower than default EF from IPCC for Asia country (47 kg head-1 yr-1). The conclusion is enteric CH4 EF for beef cattle in Indonesia calculated using Tier-2 method shows the real livestock system in Indonesia condition. Further research needed to be addressed are calculation of EFs for various breeds and feeding systems, since large variations of breeds and types of feed among provinces in Indonesia.
Estimated variance components and breeding values for pre-weaning growth criteria in Romney sheep Faid-Allah, Eslam; Ghoneim, E.; Ibrahim, A.H.M.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 21, No 2 (2016): JUNE 2016
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (384.471 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v21i2.1353

Abstract

This study was carried out to investigate variance components, direct heritability, maternal genetic parameters, estimated breeding values and factors affecting pre-weaning growth criteria of Romney sheep. Data were collected over the period from 2006 to 2012 with records of 4989 lambs descended from 76 rams and 2190 ewes of Romney sheep maintained at S. Island of New Zealand via Gene Marker Lab., Faculty of Agric. and Life Sci., Lincoln Univ., New Zealand. Results proved that genetic and non-genetic factors affecting studied criteria had significant effects (P&lt;0.05). Genetic and environmental estimates of live body weights at birth (LBW), weaning (LWW) and Kleiber ratio (KR) were 0.20±0.074, 0.15±0.042 and 0.14±0.052 for direct heritability (h2a±SE); 0.59±0.219, 0.41±0.023 and 0.08±0.002 for maternal heritability (h2m±SE); 0.11684, 2.6378 and 0.27565 for additive variances (σ2a), 0.34596, 7.1179 and 0.14532 for maternal variances (σ2m); and 0.002395, 10.1262 and 0.509339 for permanent environmental variances (σ2e), respectively. EBV’s of LBW, LWW and KR ranged from -0.555: 0.502, -1.554: 3.006 and -0.633: 0.242 direct, -0.863: 0.954, -4.942: 2.554 and -0.469: 0.179 maternal for rams, respectively; and -0.664: 0.830, -2.996: 4.586 and -1.651: 0.677 direct, 1.429: 1.142, -7.541: 4.920 and -1.223: 0.492 maternal for ewes, respectively. Results suggest the importance of considering the non-genetic factors in pre-weaning growth performance of lambs. Moderate heritability and positive coefficients of phenotypic and genetic correlation for studied criteria indicate to the possibility of improving them using traditional selection.
Greenhouse gas emissions from cattle production sector in South Korea Febrisiantosa, Andi; Lee, J.H.; Choi, H.L.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 21, No 2 (2016): JUNE 2016
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (513.425 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v21i2.1359

Abstract

South Korea has declared to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 30% compared to the current level by the year 2020. The greenhouse gas emissions from the cattle production sector in South Korea were evaluated in this study. The greenhouse gas emissions of dairy cattle, Non-Korean native cattle, and Korean native (Hanwoo) cattle production activities in 16 local administrative provinces of South Korea over a ten-year period (2005–2014) were estimated using the methodology specified by the Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventory of the IPCC (2006). The emissions studied herein included methane from enteric fermentation, methane from manure management, nitrous oxide from manure management and carbon dioxide from direct on-farm energy use. Over the last ten years, Hanwoo cattle production activities were the primary contributor of CH4 from enteric fermentation, CH4 from manure management, NO2 from manure management and CO2 from on-farm energy use in the cattle livestock sector of South Korea, which comprised to 83.52% of total emissions from cattle production sector.
In vitro rumen fermentation characteristics and microbes of thin tail sheep given sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L) biomass Sudarman, Asep; Hayashida, M.; Miralestari, M.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 21, No 2 (2016): JUNE 2016
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (195.227 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v21i2.1355

Abstract

Sweet potato plant is produced in Indonesia in large quantities. Sweet potato leaves and stems can be used as a source of protein and the tuber can be used as an energy source. This study was aimed to analyze the effect of feeding of sweet potato biomass on the rumen fermentation characteristics, digestibility of dry matter and organic matter as well as rumen microbial population of thin tail sheep. This study used a randomized block design by applying four feed treatments, i.e., T0 (100% Napier grass), T1 (70% of Napier grass + 30% concentrate), T2 (50% of Napier grass + 50% sweet potato leaves), and T3 (70% sweet potato leaves + 30% sweet potato tuber) with three replicates. Rumen fluid samples were taken with stomach tube method using a vacuum pump.  Results showed that the T3 diet has higher (P&lt;0.05) digestibility of dry matter and organic matter, concentration of NH3 and VFA, and rumen bacterial population than those of T0 and T1diets but similar to that of T2 diet. Rumen pH and protozoa population was not different among the treatments. It can be concluded that the use of sweet potato biomass can improve the quality of rumen fermentation of sheep.
Effect of addition of vitamin C in diluent medium for quality of dairy cow (Bos taurus) spermataozoa after thawing Afiati, Fifi; Lestari, D.A.; Malini, D.M.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 21, No 2 (2016): JUNE 2016
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (512.902 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v21i2.1360

Abstract

The process of freezing and thawing of semen could lead spermatozoa death and low fertility for alive spermatozoa. This research was subjected to determine the optimum concentration of vitamin C in diluent media to improve the quality of non-sexing and sexing result of thawed dairy cattle (Bos taurus) spermatozoa. The method used was completely randomized design with 3x4 factorial consisting of spermatozoa isolation and vitamin C concentration. Spermatozoa isolation factors were non-sexing and sexing results (X and Y spermatozoa). Vitamin C concentrations factors were 0% (K); 0.25% (P1); 0.50% (P2) and 0.75% (P3). Data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncans Multiple Range Test 95%. The optimum concentration of vitamin C in diluent media to improve the quality of non-sexing thawed dairy cattle (Bos taurus) spermatozoa was 0.25%. While the optimum concentration of vitamin C in diluent medium to improve quality of thawed dairy cattle (Bos taurus) spermatozoa both X and Y was 0.50%. Administration of vitamin C in diluent media could improve the quality of thawed non-sexed and sexed (X and Y spermatozoa) spermatozoa in dairy cattle (Bos taurus).Kata Kunci: Spermatozoa, Bos taurus, Vitamin C, Sexing, Diluent, Thawing
Effect of different protein and energy levels in concentrate diets on nutrient intake and milk yield of Saanen x Etawah Grade goats Supriyati, .; Krisnan, R.; Budiarsana, I.G.M.; Praharani, L.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 21, No 2 (2016): JUNE 2016
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (222.804 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v21i2.1356

Abstract

Dairy goat contributes to food and nutrition security. However, information on nutrient consumption and milk yield, as well as milk composition of Saanen x Etawah (SAPERA) grade goat is limited. This experiment was done to evaluated nutrient intake, milk yield and its composition of lactating SAPERA goats fed with different levels of dietary energy and protein in concentrate diet. Thirty multiparous SAPERA goats were used in a randomized block design with three treatments (R1, R2 and R3) and ten replications for 12 weeks of lactation. The concentrate diets were formulated to contain: 18% CP and 72% TDN (R1), 17% CP and 75% TDN (R2), 16% CP and 78% TDN (R3). Those does were penned individually, and fed by basal diet (fresh chopped King Grass ad libitum, 500 g of fresh mixed forages) and 1 kg of experimental concentrate. Results showed that the treatments had significant (P&lt;0.05) effects on CP, DIP, Ca, P intakes and FCR but had no significant (P&gt;0.05) effects on DM and TDN intake. No significant differences were found in milk yield and milk composition between treatments. In conclusion, this trial suggested that the best feed for lactating SAPERA goats was the mixture of chopped grasses, mixed forages and concentrate diets (16% CP and 78% TDN) with 160 g/kg CP and 750 g/kg TDN of the total DM, produced a milk of 1.55 kg/d with 90 g/day of milk fat, 43 g/day of milk protein and 75 g/day of milk lactose.
Productivity of Indigofera zollingeriana under different canopy and soil acidity level in oil palm estate Herdiawan, Iwan
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 21, No 2 (2016): JUNE 2016
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (236.507 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v21i2.1361

Abstract

Oil palm estate area in Indonesia is generally located in a sub-optimal land that has great opportunity for the development of forage supply. This study aims were to determine productivity of Indigofera zollingeriana under various canopy level. This research used factorial randomized block design with 3 canopy levels (under 2, 5, and 7 year oil palm canopy) and 2 levels of soil acidity (neutral and acid soil) treatments, where each treatment was repeated 4 times. Parameters observed were production and nutrient content of Indigofera zollingeriana. Research results showed that there was no interaction between the canopy levels and soil acidity on the production of fresh leaves, stems/branches, biomass, and leaves/stem ratio of I. zollingeriana. Production of fresh leaves, stems, biomass, and leaves/branches ratio of I. zollingeriana significantly (P &lt;0.01) decreased along with increase of canopy level. Soil acidity significantly (P &lt;0.05) decreased production of fresh leaves, stems, biomass, and leaves/branches ratio. Level of canopy treatment significantly (P &lt;0.05) increased content of crude protein, crude fiber and energy, otherwise value of in vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD) and organic matter digestibilyity (IVOMD) were decrease. Soil acidity significantly (P &lt;0.05) decreased calcium content, in vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD) and organic matter digestibility (IVOMD) of I. zollingeriana.
Histological changes of liver tissue and serobiochemical relation in does with pregnancy ketosis Azmi, A.F.M.; Ghani, A.A.A.; Saadan, A.S.; Mokrish, A.; Lai, K.S.; Zamri-Saad, M.; Zuki, A.B.; Hassim, H.A.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 21, No 2 (2016): JUNE 2016
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (200.17 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v21i2.1357

Abstract

Histological changes of liver in does with pregnancy ketosis were characterized. Twenty pregnant does at day 80 of pregnancy were used for this experiment. A total of 10 does were fed by grass (Napier) and goat concentrate with water ad libitum. Those 10 goats considered as healthy pregnant goat, and another 10 goats showing clinical and subclinical signs of ketosis considered as unhealthy pregnant does. Liver biopsies were performed when clinical signs appeared. Beta-Hydroxybutyrate (BHBA), free fatty acid (FFA), and glucose were dosed. Histological preparation revealed similar incidence and intensity of mild liver steatosis with lower cellular vacuolation in hepatocyte presence in healthy late pregnant does. Almost all of the pregnant does with ketosis state (n=8/10) had large amount of small lipid droplets in almost every hepatocyte over the whole liver acinus with higher number of cellular vacuolation, and related with higher BHBA and FFA levels while low in glucose level.

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