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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
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Articles 9 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 21, No 1 (2016): MARCH 2016" : 9 Documents clear
Anaerobic fermentation effectively reduces concentration of total tannins in Chromolaena odorata Mullik, Yelly M.; Ridla, Muhammad; Prihantoro, Iwan; Mullik, Marthen L.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 21, No 1 (2016): MARCH 2016
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (296.731 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v21i1.1301

Abstract

Chromolaena odorata is a potential feed source but its usage is hampered by presence of various secondary metabolic compounds in plant’s tissues. One group of them is tannin. This experiment was aimed to evaluate various pre-treatment methods on total tannin concentration and in vitro digestibility of dry- and organic-matter. An 8 x 3 completely randomized experimental design was employed to test 8 different treatments. The treatments were: Fresh = freshly-chopped chromolaena  leaves as control,  Sun-dried = sun-dried (3x 24 hours) chromolaena leaves, Oven-dried = oven-dried (60oC for 24 hours) chromolaena leaves,  Boiled = water-boiled (5 minutes) chromolaena leaves, RenWater = water-soaked (4 hours) chromolaena leaves,  RenNaOH = NaOH-soaked (4 hours) chromolaena leaves,  RenHCl = HCl-soaked (4 hours) chromolaena leaves, and Fermented = anaerobically-fermented (21 days) chromolaena leaves. Parameters measured were concentration of total tannins and nutrient content. The results showed that application of low heat (Sun-dried), hot water (Boiled), water soaking (RenWater), or unaeobic fermentation technique significantly reduced total tannin by 43% into 62% compared to control. The highest suppression (62%) was achieved by Fermented treatment. In the contrary, medium heat application (oven-dried at 60°C) or chemicaltreatments (HCl or NaOH) had no effect. Protein content of chromolaena was improved by 60% and crude fiber was reduced by 32% in Fermentaed treatment compared to the control. It could be concluded that anaerobic fermentation can be used an effective strategy to reduce tannin concentration in Chromolaena odorata without affecting its feeding value.
Relationship of extender and packaging system an the length of preservation and the quality of chilled semen of Boer goat Febretrisiana, Arie; Anwar, .; Sinulingga, Simon
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 21, No 1 (2016): MARCH 2016
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (345.586 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v21i1.1350

Abstract

The aim of this research was to compare the effectiveness of different extender (either Triladyl or Tris Egg Yolk extender) and different packaging method (pool and straw) of chilled semen an the length of preservation and the quality of chilled semen of Boer goat. Semen was collected using an artificial vagina from 3 two years old Boer bucks with body weight of 50-55 kg. It was evaluated under a microscope, then each was diluted either in Tris egg yolk extender (TEY) or Triladyl. Those diluted sperms were then packed either in pool or straw and preserved at 5⁰C refrigerator. Sperm motility, viability and membrane integrity of each group were evaluated every 24 h for up to 5 days. Results showed that sperm motility in Triladyl of  pool packaging system up to 3 days was higher than straw packaging system or TEY in pool or straw packaging system which were 45.8%, 26.1%, 32.1% and 9.1%, respectively (P<0.05). Percentage of sperm membrane integrity showed the same pattern to Triladyl both in pool and straw packaging system which was higher than TEY group (75.2% and 77,2%; P<0.05). Sperm viability in Triladyl both in pool or straw packaging system decreased (P<0.05) after 3 days of preservation (77.1% and 76.2%) but TEY significanly decreased after 4 days of preservation either in pool or straw packaging system (73.2% and 58.0%; P<0.05). It was concluded that sperm quality decreased with increasing of the length of preservation while Triladyl extender in pool packaging system showed the best quality.Key Words: Chilled Semen, Boer, Triladyl, Tris Egg Yolk, Straw
Determination of production capacity of circulated primordial germ cells (circulated-PGCs) of KUB chicken using lysis buffer ammonium chloride potassium (ACK) Sopiyana, Soni; Supriatna, Iman; Setiadi, M. Agus; Fahrudin, Mohamad
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 21, No 1 (2016): MARCH 2016
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (308.809 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v21i1.1315

Abstract

In poultry embryos, primordial germ cells (PGCs) are progenitor cells for gametes, which have unique migration pathway. Primordial germ cells arise from epiblast in germinal crescent and circulate through the bloodstream for a short period of time, then leave blood vessel to migrate toward gonads. The aim of this study was to determine the potential production capacity of circulated-PGCs of KUB chicken at different developmental stages of embryo using a rapid and simple method. Seventy five KUB chicken fertile eggs were divided into five groups and incubated at 38.5 0C with a humidity of 60%. Hatching was set to the embryonic development stage of 14-18. The blood was collected through dorsal aorta using micropipette under microscope. The collected blood was placed in a 1.5 ml eppendorf tube which was previously filled with 100 µl phosphate buffered saline without Ca2+ and Mg2+ (PBS-) mixed with fetal bovine serum (FBS) with a ratio of 90%:10%. The PGCs were purified using lysis buffer ammonium chloride potassium method. The results showed that average production of circulated-PGCs per embryo of KUB chicken were significantly affected by stage of embryonic development (P <0.05). The average production of circulated-PGCs at stage 14, 15, 16, 17, and 18 were 37.9; 53.5; 49.8; 38.3; and 33.5 respectively. The number of circulated-PGCs was not different among stages 14, 17 nor 18. The highest number of circulated-PGCs of KUB chicken was obtained at stage 15, so that the isolation and collection of PGCs through the blood circulation was recommended in stage 15.Key Words: KUB Chicken, PGCs, Embryonic Development Stage, Ammonium Chloride Potassium
Phylogenetic tree of Kuantan cattle by DNA barcoding Hidayati, .; Misrianti, R.; Ali, A.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 21, No 1 (2016): MARCH 2016
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (499.973 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v21i1.1351

Abstract

Kuantan cattle is one of local beef cattle breed of Riau Province which its origin was unknown. Kuantan cattle are commonly found in Indragiri Hulu and Kuantan Singingi Regency. Based on phenotype characterizations, kuantan cattles are similar with pesisir cattle (West Sumatera beef cattle). Historically, kuantan cattle were pesisir cattle brought by “minang” immigrants (Immigrant from West Sumatera) to this region. The purpose of this study was to analyze the origin of the kuantan cattle through genetic diversity analysis using DNA barcode. DNA barcode used was Cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene which was found in the mtDNA. DNA isolation was done on 25 kuantan’s blood samples and 18 pesisir blood samples. Amplification of COI gene segment used Polymerase Chain Reaction technique. The forward primer sequence used in this study was F’5 TTCTCAACCAACCATAAAGATATTGG-3’ and the reverse primer sequence used was reverse 5’-TAGACTTCGGGGTGTCCAAAGAATCA-3. It squeezed kuantan and pesisir sequence 5711 - 6420 base (GeneBank accession number NC_005971) with length by 710 bp. Analysis result of sequence using MEGA 5.2 Program showed that there were 6 polymorphic sites establishing 7 haplotypes on kuantan cattle and 9 polymorphic sites establishing 12 haplotypes on pesisir cattle. Based on genetic distance and phylogeney tree, kuantan and pesisir cattle were in same group with Bos indicus. Mutation in the COI gene segment in this study was too small and was not able to distinguish the difference of those breeds. The result of neighbor joining analyze indicated that kuantan cattle origin was from Bos indicus just like pesisir cattle.Key Words: COI Gene, Polymorphic, Kuantan Cattle, Genetic Distance, Phylogenetic Tree
Effectivity of BS4 enzyme complex on the performance of laying hens fed with different ingredients Sinurat, Arnold P.; Purwadaria, Tresnawati; Haryati, Tuti
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 21, No 1 (2016): MARCH 2016
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (288.566 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v21i1.1389

Abstract

An experiment was carried out to evaluate the effectivity of an enzyme complex produced by Eupenicilium javanicum BS4 on the performance of laying hens fed with different feed ingredients. Three diets were formulated with similar nutrients (protein, ME, digestible amino acids, Ca and available P) value to meet the nutrient requirement of laying hens.  Diets were formulated based on maize, palm kernel cake (PKC) or rice bran.  The diets were either supplemented or not with BS4 enzyme complex and fed to Isa Brown pullet from 19 to 37 weeks old. Each diet was fed to 24 birds and the performances were recorded. Data were analysed statistically with 2 X 3 factorial design with six replicates. Results showed that supplementation of BS4 enzyme into laying hens diet did not influence body weight change, feed intake, mortalities, egg weight and egg shell thickness but significantly increased egg production (P<0.05) and the FCR (P<0.01) in any feedstuff tested. It also improved egg yolk colour score on diet contained 20% PKC. Laying hens fed 20% PKC produced more eggs than those fed maize or rice bran. The egg shell of laying hens fed rice bran were thicker than those fed with maize or PKC. It is concluded that BS4 enzyme complex is effective when supplemented into laying hens diet.
In Vitro protein digestibility and fermentability of mulberry (Morus alba)-Leucaena foliage mixed feed Yulistiani, Dwi; Jelan, Z. A.; Liang, J. B.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 21, No 1 (2016): MARCH 2016
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (335.605 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v21i1.1352

Abstract

This experiment was carried out to determine the effect of mulberry-leucaena foliage mixed feed on protein digestibility and VFA production using an in vitro gas production study. Mulberry was mixed with one of 2 leucaena varieties (Leucaena leucocephala hybrid and Leucaena leucocephala local) at 3 levels (0, 25 and 50%). Study was conducted in completely randomized design. Mulberry foliage, leucaena and mixtures of mulberry-leucaena were incubated for 24 hours in glass syringes. Parameter recorded were gas production, in vitro true dry matter digestibility (IVTDMD), in vitro N digestibility (IVND) and VFA production. Results of the study showed that supplementation of leucaena to mulberry decreased IVOMD, gas production and protein digestibility in the rumen buffered medium. The mixture of mulberry and leucaena hybrid at ratio 50% resulted in the lowest IVND than other treatment. However it increased protein digestibility in acid pepsin incubation as an estimate of protein availability in intestine. Gas production decreased in mulberry leucaena mixtures was followed by decreased total VFA production. Tannin derived from leucaena hybrid supplementation to mulberry at ratio 1 : 1 was most effective to decrease protein digestion in the rumen and to increase protein digestibility in acid pepsin incubation. In conclusion mixing of hybrid leucaena hybrid with mulberry foliage was able to protect protein degradation from mulberry in the rumen.
Chitosan nanoparticle of hCG (Human Chorionic Gonadotrophin) hormone in increasing induction of dairy cattle ovulation Pamungkas, Fitra Aji; Sianturi, Ria Sari Gail; Wina, Elizabeth; Kusumaningrum, Diana Andrianita
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 21, No 1 (2016): MARCH 2016
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (224.19 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v21i1.1343

Abstract

A controlled release delivery system of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) hormone helps to overcome the rapid degradation of hCG hormone in the blood, to avoid the use of multiple injections for ovulation induction and to enhance reproductive efficacy. This study aimed to prepare chitosan nanoparticles hCG (CS-NPh) and to determine its efficacy as nasal spray of CS-NPh. The observed parameters include physico-chemical characteristics of CS-NPh and the follicle size, corpus luteum, the time of ovulation and onset of estrus performed after administration of CS-NPh as a nasal spray compared with intramuscular hCG (control) at a dose of 1,000 IU in dairy cattle. The result showed that the formation of the hormone hCG nanoparticles is still in the size range of nanoparticles with a well and more stable molecular mass distribution, so it can be used as a carrier component of hormones. The result showed that the time of ovulation after hCG by intramuscular (day to 3.13±0.35) and CS-NPh as a nasal spray (days to 3.33±0.49) with the follicle size by 1.62±0.22 and 1.76±0.28 cm showed no significant differences (p> 0.05), likewise the size of the corpus luteum and onset of oestrus. This indicates that administration of CS-NPh as a nasal spray can be used in enhancing the induction of ovulation in dairy cattles.Key Words: Nanoparticles, hCG, Nasal Spray, Ovulation
Follicular dynamic and repeatability of follicular wave development in Peranakan Ongole (PO) cattle Imron, Muhammad; Supriatna, Iman; Amrozi, .; Setiadi, Mohamad Agus
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 21, No 1 (2016): MARCH 2016
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (289.182 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v21i1.1349

Abstract

Superovulation treatment on PO cattle (Bos indicus) was less responsive compared to Bos taurus breed. It might due to the difference of their follicular dynamic. This study was conducted to investigate the follicular dynamics and its repeatability in PO cattle. Follicular dynamics observations conducted on 9 cows trough ultrasound scanning every day. Observations of wave patterns repeatability were performed in 6 cows which its wave pattern already known on the next consecutive IOI.  Research result indicated that PO cattle had 3 (66%) and 4-waves (34%) pattern. The first wave of 3 and 4-waves pattern emerged on day -0.4+0.9 and 1.4+1.1 respectively.  The second wave of 3 and 4-wave pattern emerged on day 9.8+1.5 and 7.4+1.9 respectively.  The pattern of 3 waves has a longer follicle dominant duration (11.6+1.5 day) in the first wave of estrous cycle, compared with 4 waves pattern (10+2.92 and 7+1.00 day respectively). The growth rate of dominant follicle was not different significantly between the 3 and 4-waves pattern (0.87+0.23 and 0.94+0.25 mm/day respectively). Similarly, ovulatory follicle diameter between 3 and 4-waves pattern was also not different significantly (12.24+12.34 and 12.30+12.23 mm respectively). Observation of wave patterns repeatability in 6 PO cows indicated that PO cattle had high repeatability in follicular wave pattern (0.88) and the number of growing follicle was 0.91.  This study resulted data for dynamic of follicular development, wave pattern, its repeatability which be expected to design the protocol of superovulation treatment or other reproduction technologies based on follicular dynamic to improve its result in PO cattle. 
Potency of antigenic and serologic tests based on CNTKCQTP linear epitope on H5N1 haemagglutinin for Avian Influenza Tarigan, Simson; Sumarningsih, .
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 21, No 1 (2016): MARCH 2016
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (404.305 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v21i1.1251

Abstract

Rapid diagnostic tools or point-of-care (POC) test is needed in the effort to control and eradicate the high pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 in Indonesia. Accuracy of a POC test is determined by the specificity of antibodies, which is the main component of a POC test. Recently a linear epitope, CNTCKQTP epitope, located at 274-281 amino acid residue of H5 hemagglutinin has been confirmed to be present all clade of H5N1 viruses. This study aimed at producing and evaluating the reactivity of a monospecific, polyclonal antibody against the epitope. The Antibody was produced by immunising a goat with the peptide in the form of multiple antigen peptide (MAP). The specificity of the antibody was estimated by assaying its reactivity against influenza virus subtypes H3N3, H4N4, H5N1, H6N5, H7N7, H9N2, H10N7 and H11N9; and recombinant hemagglutinins H1-H12, H14 and H15 with ELISA and immunoblot. The results of the assay showed that CNTKCQTP antibody was not specific for H5 haemagglutinin because it cross-reacted with other haemagglutinins especially H7, H8 and H9. The potential of the peptide containing the epitope, GNCNTKCQTPMGAINSS. as an ELISA reagent for assaying H5 antibodies in chickens previously vaccinated and challenged with the H5N1 virus was also evaluated in this study. In contrast, the results of previous studies, the ELISA using GNCNTKCQTPMGAINSS as coating antigen was not sensitive in detecting antibody to haemagglutinin H5 in chickens.Key Words: AI Virus, Hemagglutinin H5, CNTKCQTP Epitope, MAP, Immunoassay

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