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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 17 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 20, No 3 (2015): SEPTEMBER 2015" : 17 Documents clear
Multi-trait and multi-source selection indices for milk production and reproductive traits in a herd of Holstein cattle in Egypt Faid-Allah, Eslam
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 20, No 3 (2015): SEPTEMBER 2015
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (585.634 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v20i3.1182

Abstract

The main aim of this study was explore possibility to improve milk production and reproductive traits of Holstein cattle via selection index method which include general, reduced, sub and Multi-source of information indices (Own-Performance, Full-Sibs and Half-Sibs). Data was obtained from a commercial farm (Safi Masr for Developing the Animal Resources), located in the Nile Delta, Dakahlia, Egypt. Data included 4791 records of 1797 cows, 794 dams and 67 sires that represented the period from 2002 to 2012. Estimates of genetic and phenotypic parameters for studied traits were computed and used to construct 18 selection indices to improve milk production and reproductive traits. Full index incorporating milk yield at 305d (305-dMY), lactation period (LP), days open (DO) and age at first calving (AFC) had the highest correlation with aggregate breeding value (Rih = 0.518; RE=100%). The correlation fell to 0.455 when 305-dMY was omitted from the index. The general index has the maximum expected genetic gain in 305-dMY (132.6 kg) per generation were accompanied by decrease of LP (-4.679 day), DO (-3.449 day) and AFC (-1.41 month) when all four traits were included in the index (I 1). The expected genetic gain for 305-dMY decreased to 26.84 kg/generation when 305-dMY was excluded in index 5 (I5). In addition, Using multi-source of information will enhance correlation with aggregate breeding value (Rih= 0.740; RE=142.91%) and raised the expected genetic gain per generation for 305-dMY (209 kg) and decreasing the expected genetic gain for LP (-6.37 day), DO (-4.244 day) and AFC (1.843 month) when all four traits were included in the index (I16). It could be suggested using the higher indexes of Rih (I1 (RE=100)) to improve milk production and reproductive traits in Holstein cattle under own-performance strategy and using (I16 (RE=142.91)) under multi-source strategy to get high accuracy and higher expected genetic changes per generation compare to general index. Key Words: Body Weight, Genetic Parameter, Selection Index, Holstein Cattle Pre-published articles are temporarily in "Article In Press" and have not been formally published.
Heritability estimation and environmental factors affecting production traits of Indonesian Ongole cross Hartati, .; Muladno, .; Jakaria, .; Priyanto, R.; Gunawan, A.; Aryogi, .; Talib, Chalid
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 20, No 3 (2015): SEPTEMBER 2015
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (311.514 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v20i3.1183

Abstract

Productivity data from 560 head of PO cattle have been collected for 9 years from 2004 until 2013 for evaluating heritability estimation and environmental factors affecting production traits of Indonesian Ongole cross from birth to yearling old. Heritability estimation were analyzed using varians analysis with data of paternal halfsib correlation. Varians component for to estimate of heritability value were analyzed using completely randomized design one - way classification. While a general linear model was used to analyze the environmental factors (sex, year, parity, season and type of births). The results showed that sex of calves and year of births had significant differences (P<0.05) for all production traits such as weight at birth, weaning and yearling, while the type of birth only presented a significant difference on birth weight. Parity, season and generation exhibited nonsignificantly effect on those production traits. Estimation of heritability on birth weight, weaning weight and yearling weight were 0.28+0.12; 0.47+0.15 and 0.63+0.17 respectively. The highest heritability values obtained in yearling weight, this means that yearling weight will be effective as selection criteria to improve the genetic of PO cattle. Key Words: Genetic, Non Genetic, Production, PO Cattle
Antimicrobial and antioxidative activities of peptides from goat milk hydrolyzed with protease Kusumaningtyas, Eni; Widiastuti, Raphaella; Kusumaningrum, H. D.; Suhartono, M. T.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 20, No 3 (2015): SEPTEMBER 2015
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (241.793 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v20i3.1184

Abstract

Milk is highly nutritious food containing protein as a good source of bioactive peptide that beneficial for health. This research was aimed to explore potency of bioactive peptide derived from goat milk as an antimicrobial and antioxidant. Milk was hydrolyzed by trypsin, chymotrypsin, pepsin, or protease Bacillus sp. E.13. The peptides obtained were screened for antimicrobial activities through incubation with Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella thyphimurium and Escherichia coli at 106 CFU/mL at 37°C for two hours and plated on Mueller Hinton agar. Antimicrobial activities were determined by comparing the total bacterial colonies to that of bacterial control without peptides addition. Oxidative activity was determined by 2.2’-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS) and 2.2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assays. Antimicrobial activities were shown in peptides produced from hydrolysis of goat milk protein by pepsin at 37°C, pH 2 for 90 min and by Bacillus sp. E.13 protease at 55°C, pH 11 for 30 and 60 min but the activities were not detected in peptides from hydrolysis by trypsin and chymotrypsin. Peptide from protein hydrolysis by Bacillus sp. E.13 protease could inhibit Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella thyphimurium and Escherichia coli up to 5 log cycles. The antimicrobial peptides could scavenge ABTS radical up to 86 % and DPPH radical up to 9 % at 68 μg protein/mL. Results indicated that goat milk protein hydrolyzed by Bacillus sp. E.13 protease is potential as antimicrobes and antioxidant. Key Words: Goat Milk, Peptide, Antimicrobe, Antioxidant
Effect of enzyme supplementation on nutritive values of fermented palm kernel cake used to substitute soybean meal in broiler diet Sinurat, Arnold P.; Purwadaria, Tresnawati; Purba, Maijon
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 20, No 3 (2015): SEPTEMBER 2015
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (257.23 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v20i3.1185

Abstract

Two experiments was designed to improve nutritional values of palm kernel cake (PKC) by biofermentation process, followed by enzyme supplementation to substitute soybean meal (SBM) in broilers diet. A factorial of 2 x 2 design was applied in the first experiment, i.e. fermentation process (non fermented PKC and fermented PKC) and enzyme supplementation (no enzyme and +BS4 enzyme). Dry matter (DM) digestibility, AME and amino acids ileal digestibility (IAAD) of the treatment ingredients were measured in broiler chickens. Seven replications were applied for the DM and AME assays and 3 replications for IAAD assay. Second experiment was designed to study the effect of SBM substitution with enzyme supplemented FPKC (EFPKC). Four diets were formulated, i.e., control diet without EFPKC, 10%, 20 and 40% SBM substituted with EFPKC. All diets were formulated to meet the nutrient requirements of broilers. Each diet was fed to broilers from 1 to 35 d. Body weight, feed consumption, FCR and mortalities were measured. Carcass yield, abdominal fat and weight of liver and gizzard were measured at the end of experiment. Results showed that fermentation of PKC increased the DM digestibility, the AME was also increased but not significant. Enzyme supplementation did not affect the DM digestibility and AME of PKC. Fermentation process significantly (P<0.05) decreased IAAD of some indispensable amino acids. However, supplementation of enzyme did not affect the IAAD of indispensable amino acids. Substitution of soybean meal with EFPKC reduced the feed intake and growth rate of broilers. Key Words: Palm Kernel Cake, Fermentation, Enzyme, Broilers, Soybean Meal
Administration of extract Salix tetrasperma combined with extract of turmeric and neem to improve eggs quality of chicken reared under heat stress Sugito, .; Hambal, M.; Isa, M.; Nurliana, .; Delima, D.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 20, No 3 (2015): SEPTEMBER 2015
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (220.829 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v20i3.1186

Abstract

Quality of eggs might decrease when hens under heat stress. A further study found that a specific plant extracts could reduce the impacts of heat stress. The aim of this study was to determine effects of Salix tetrasperma plant extract in combination with extract of turmeric and neem to improve egg quality and productivity of laying hens under heat stress. Sixty laying hens strain Isa Brown of 6 months old were used and reared in individual cages. The feed and drinking water were supplied ad libitum. This study was conducted in a completely randomized design with five treatments (two controls and three treatments) and each treatment consisted of 12 replication. Treatment consisted of with (KP) and without (KP) commercial anti-stress supplement. Formulations of extract were S. tetrasperma 1.000 mg / l water (EJ), S. tetrasperma 1.000 mg / l + Turmeric 250 mg / l + neem 250 mg / l (EJ+K1), and S. tetrasperma 1.000 mg / l + Turmeric 500 mg / l + neem 500 mg / l drinking water (EJ+K2). The hens were exposed to heat stress for 5 hours per day at a temperature range of 34.0±1.0°C. Supplements were dissolved in drinking water and were given for 30 days in the morning and noon. Results showed that a single extract of S. tetrasperma or the combination of an extract of turmeric and neem were significantly increased thickness of eggshell (P<0.05), but did not affect color of egg yolk, height albumin, egg weight, and HU value. Extract of S. tetrasperma combined with turmeric and neem extract dissolved in drinking water for 30 days in laying hens reared under heat stress could not improved quality of the eggs, but may increase thickness of the egg shell and cause decreased water consumption. Key Words: Egg Quality, Salix tetrasperma, Turmeric, Neem, Heat Stress
Lipid profiles of blood serum and fatty acid composition of meat of hybrid duck fed diet supplemented with Noni (Morinda citrifolia) fruit meal Kurniawan, David; Widodo, E.; Djunaidi, I. H.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 20, No 3 (2015): SEPTEMBER 2015
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (213.411 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v20i3.1187

Abstract

Noni fruit is a medicinal plant with biological activity like antioxidant that could potentially be used as a feed additive in poultry. This research investigated the effect of noni fruit powder as feed additive on lipid profiles of blood and meat fatty acid compositions of meat of hybrid duck. One hundred twenty 2-week-old hybrid ducks crossing between Peking and Khaki Campbell duck were subjected. They were randomly allotted to 24 experimental units. Each experimental unit was 70x80x40 cm in size and it was used for 5 ducks up to they reached 56 days of age. Each unit was equipped with waterer and feeder. The ducks were raised on litter-type floor. The basal experimental diet was formulated according to the standards of National Research Council (1994). The method used for this study was experimental with 4 different treatments in 6 replications. The treatments were as follow: P0: basal feed without supplementation of noni fruit powder as control; P1: basal feed + 1 % noni fruit powder; P2: basal feed + 2 % noni fruit powder; P3: basal feed + 3 % noni fruit powder. Data were analyzed by one-way of Completely Randomized Design ANOVA and if there was significant effect followed by Duncan’s Multiple Range Test. Result showed that using noni fruit powder as feed additive had no significant effect (P>0.05) on lipid profiles of blood and fatty acid composition of meat. Key Words: Noni Fruit, Phytobiotic, Fatty Acid, Blood Lipid
Production and quality of Murdannia bracteata biomass as impact of magnesium foliar fertilizer Rahmawati, Tenti; Abdullah, Luki; Prihantoro, Iwan
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 20, No 3 (2015): SEPTEMBER 2015
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (126.305 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v20i3.1188

Abstract

Murdannia bracteata is one of potential forages for ruminant that has not been studied yet. This forage contents high mineral and it can be as fungtional feed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the growth and productivity, chlorophyll and minerals content of Murdannia bracteata caused by magnesium foliar application. The experiment was arranged in randomized complete design with five treatments and 4 replications. The application of magnesium level was arranged into: 0 ppm, 2000 ppm, 4000 ppm, 8000 ppm, and 12000 ppm. The study was conducted in a greenhouse, field laboratory of Agrostology, Faculty of Animal Science, Bogor Agricultural University. The result showed that growth, productivity, and chlorophyll content were not significantly (P>0.05) affected by increasing magnesium level. Increasing magnesium dossage resulted in decreasing calsium, potassium, and zink content (P<0,05), but not on phosphor and sodium (P>0,05). In conclusion, increasing magnesium dossage up to 12000 ppm did not significantly affect growth, productivity, and chlorophyll content. However, increasing magnesium level decreased calsium, potassium, and zink content. Key Words: Murdannia Bracteata, Magnesium, Productivity, Quality
Pathological changes of suspected tetrachloro dibenzo--dioxins/tetrachloro dibenzofurans toxication in beef cattle Sani, Yulvian; Indraningsih, .
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 20, No 3 (2015): SEPTEMBER 2015
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (718.322 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v20i3.1189

Abstract

The contamination of tetrachlorodibenzo-r-dioxins (TCDDs) and tetra chlorinated dibenzofurans (TCDFs) may affect human or animal health such as cancer, reproductive failure, dermaltoxicities and neurologic effects. The present study describes the effects of TCDD/TCDFs contamination in feed to various tissues of beef cattle to which TCDD/TCDFs were detected byGC MS/MS. The results revealed that POPs (DDT, heptachlor, aldrin, dieldrin and endrin) as a precursor for dioxins were detected in all samples except drinking water. The total concentration of OC in soils was Nd – 42.73 mg/kg, grasses (3.30 – 27.66 mg/kg), well water (0.82 – 1.00 mg/kg), feed mill (3.90 mg/kg), sera (Nd – 13.08 mg/kg) and meats (Nd – 100.72 mg/kg). Futhermore, the TEQ residues of TCDDs/TCDFs in beef were 4496.66 - 20642.40 pg/g from Yogyakarta, and 717.13pg/g (beef) and 0.037 pg/g (brain tissues) from Solo (Central Java). The concentration of TCDD/TCDFs residues in beef was above the maximum residue limit (MRL) at 2 pg/g. Animal feeds is regarded as the main source of dioxins contamination in meats. Macroscopic changes were general anaemia, cachexia, fibrotic liver, athropic heart, ruminal impaction, constipated intestinal, haemorrhagic kidney, and ptechiae in the brain. Microscopically were depleted spleen vacuolation of interseptum, haemorrhages and accumulation of hemosiderin. Heart shows degeneration, fragmentation and pale cardiac muscle and swollen nuclei. Liver was pale, degeneration of epithelial cells and congestion. Lungs were pneumonia, oedema pulmonum and mild haemorrhage. Intestines showed haemorrhage and infiltration of mononuclear cells, neutrophyls and eosinophyls. Brain was haemorrhage, perivascular cuffs and intranuclear inclusion bodies. The animal was suffering from haemorrhagic enteritis, encephalitis, and hepatic degeneration. Key Words: TCDDs, TCDFs, POPs, animal products, matrices, GC MS/MS
Circulating H5N1 virus among native chicken living around commercial layer farms Tarigan, Simson; Indriani, Risa; Ignjatovic, J.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 20, No 3 (2015): SEPTEMBER 2015
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (510.948 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v20i3.1190

Abstract

Soon after the application of vaccination programme against high pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 outbreak of the disease in breeder and commercial layer farms has diminished remarkably in West Java. This study aimed to investigate whether the H5N1 decline is related to the disappearance of source of infection around the farms. Serum samples were collected from 421 native chicken living around commercial layer farms in the Districs of Cianajur and Sukabumi, West Java in March-April 2014.  Antibodies to avian influenza virus (AIV) H5N1 were measured using haemaglutination inhibition (HI), ELISAs and immunoblotting that measured presence of antibodies to the haemagglutin of H5N1 strain, as well as the M2e and nucleoprotein (NP) of all avian influenza viruses. Based on the combined results, 8.6% of the native chickens were seropositive to AI virus based on one or more of serological tests. This study provided serological evidence that H5N1 virus was still circulating among native chicken living around commercial layer farms. Many positive sera were however positive for antibodies in one test only: 2.4%, 3.3% and 3.8% by HI test, M2e and NP ELISA, respectively. It could be speculated that the incongruity of the results is due to the fact that HI, MM2e ELISA and NP ELISA all measure different type of antibodies and the duration of these antibodies in serum following infection with H5N1 differ. The fact that H5N1 virus is still circulating around commercial layer farms infers that the commercial farms are still under threat and therefore vaccination and strict biosecurity are still needed. Key Words: H5N1, Native Chicken, Commercial Layer, Nucleoprotein, M2e, HI Test
Effect of enzyme supplementation on nutritive values of fermented palm kernel cake used to substitute soybean meal in broiler diet Sinurat, Arnold P.; Purwadaria, Tresnawati; Purba, Maijon
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 20, No 3 (2015): SEPTEMBER 2015
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (257.23 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v20i3.1185

Abstract

Two experiments was designed to improve nutritional values of palm kernel cake (PKC) by biofermentation process, followed by enzyme supplementation to substitute soybean meal (SBM) in broilers diet. A factorial of 2 x 2 design was applied in the first experiment, i.e. fermentation process (non fermented PKC and fermented PKC) and enzyme supplementation (no enzyme and +BS4 enzyme). Dry matter (DM) digestibility, AME and amino acids ileal digestibility (IAAD) of the treatment ingredients were measured in broiler chickens. Seven replications were applied for the DM and AME assays and 3 replications for IAAD assay. Second experiment was designed to study the effect of SBM substitution with enzyme supplemented FPKC (EFPKC). Four diets were formulated, i.e., control diet without EFPKC, 10%, 20 and 40% SBM substituted with EFPKC. All diets were formulated to meet the nutrient requirements of broilers. Each diet was fed to broilers from 1 to 35 d. Body weight, feed consumption, FCR and mortalities were measured. Carcass yield, abdominal fat and weight of liver and gizzard were measured at the end of experiment. Results showed that fermentation of PKC increased the DM digestibility, the AME was also increased but not significant. Enzyme supplementation did not affect the DM digestibility and AME of PKC. Fermentation process significantly (P<0.05) decreased IAAD of some indispensable amino acids. However, supplementation of enzyme did not affect the IAAD of indispensable amino acids. Substitution of soybean meal with EFPKC reduced the feed intake and growth rate of broilers.

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