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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
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Articles 20 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 20, No 1 (2015)" : 20 Documents clear
Microencapsulation of bull spermatozoa: Its viability in alginate-egg yolk media DA, Kusumaningrum; B, Purwantara; TL, Yusuf; P, Situmorang
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 20, No 1 (2015)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v20i1.1110

Abstract

Microencapsulation of spermatozoa is a process to entrap a number of spermatozoa in microcapsule. Alginate, as a natural polymer polysaccharide is commonly used in cell microencapsulation. Tris Yolk Citrate buffer is a good buffer for spermatozoa dilution, therefore this experiment aimed to determine optimal concentration of alginate and egg yolk to sperm quality in bull spermatozoa microencapsulation. Concentration of egg yolk and alginate in media of encapsulation were determined in applications of sperm microencapsulation. Four bulls were used as semen source and only semen with good quality were used in this study. Poolled semen was diluted using the medium to get final concentration 100 x 106 cell/ ml. The first study was conducted to determine the effect of concentration of alginate (0, 1, and 1.5%) on viability of spermatozoa. The second study to determine the effect of alginate concentration, egg yolk and its interaction was done by comparing two levels of alginate (1 and 1.5%) with four levels of egg yolk (5, 10, 15 and 20%). Viability of spermatozoa, motility (M), live spermatozoa (L) and Intact Apical Ridge (IAR) were observed at 0, 1, 2 and 3 h incubation at room temperature. Results indicated that alginate concentration increased the osmolality and viscosity but did not affect pH of the medium. The osmolality and viscosity of medium were 275, 325, 425 and 1.12, 26.62, 47.98 for concentration of alginate 0, 1 and 1.5% respectively. Percentage of motility is significantly lower (P<0.05) in alginate medium than those of control, and 1.5% alginate could produce more uniform beads. Concentration of alginate, egg yolk and its interaction did not significantly affect viability of sperm. It is concluded that the combination of 1.5% alginate with 5, 10, 15 or 20% egg yolk can be used as media for sperm encapsulation. Key Words: Microencapsulation, Spermatozoa, Sodium Alginate, Egg Yolk, Viability
Genetic and non-genetic analysis for milk production and reproductive traits in Holstein cattle in Egypt E, Faid-Allah
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 20, No 1 (2015)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v20i1.1111

Abstract

This study was carried out to investigate genetic, non-genetic affecting factors and estimate genetic parameters for milk production and reproductive traits of Holstein cows via animal model. The data was obtained from a commercial farm (Safi Masr for Developing the Animal Resources), located in the Nile Delta, Dakahlia, Egypt. Data included 4791 records of 1797 cows, 794 dams and 67 sires that represented the period from 2002 to 2012. The means and coefficient of variability (CV%) of milk traits as total milk yield (TMY), 305 day milk yield (305-dMY), lactation period (LP) and dry period (DP) were 5787.8 kg (31.1%), 4695 kg (22.1%),  332 day (14.9%) and 72.3 day (27.7%), respectively. Also, the means (CV%) of reproductive traits as days open (DO) and age at first calving (AFC) were 157.9 day (22.6%) and 30.5 month (16.8%), respectively. Sire, dam, parity of cow, year and season of calving had significant effects on traits studied. Heritability estimated were 0.223, 0.184, 0.112, 0.118, 0.105 and 0.285 for TMY, 305-dMY, LP, DP, DO and AFC, respectively. Estimated rG and rP among milk production traits were positive but it takes negative trend with DP and DO. Moderate heritability estimates and positive genetic correlation for most of traits studied suggested that genetic improvement of these traits would be achieved via multi-trait selection. Key Words: Genetic Parameters, Milk Production, Reproductive, Friesian Holstein Cattle
Nutrient digestibility and growth of five breeds of sheep under different levels of undegradable protein D, Yulistiani; N, Naufaliah; D, Kardaya; ., Subandriyo
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 20, No 1 (2015)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (181.667 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v20i1.1112

Abstract

A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of feeding different levels of rumen undegradable protein (UDP) in concentrate on performance of five breeds of sheep. Namely: Compass Agrinak (CA); Garut Composite breed (KG); Barbados Cross breed (BC); St Croix breed (SC); and Local Garut (GL) breed. Ten heads of sheep were used from each breed, in which each breed was grouped into 5 groups according to their body weight, and each sheep in each group was assigned to one of two treatments diet. The diet treatment consisted of concentrate containing different levels of undegradable protein (UDP). The levels of undegradable protein were 4.5% and 7.5%. Concentrate were formulated in iso nitrogen (CP content 16.7%) and iso energy (ME content 2.5 Mcal/kg). During feeding trial the sheep were kept in individual pen for three months. Study was conducted in randomized complete block design in factorial 5 x 2 arrangement, 5 levels of breeds sheep and 2 levels of UDP content. Results shows that there was no interaction effect of breed and levels UDP on feed consumption, average daily gain and feed conversion. These variables were significantly (P<0.05) affected by breed of sheep. The highest DMI (dry matter intake) was in KG sheep, the highest DMI caused by highest crude protein and gross energy intake, which in turn lead to highest average daily gain (ADG) of this breed. However the ADG of KG was not significantly different from GL. Apparent nutrient digestibility was not affected (P>0.05) by interaction between breed of sheep and UDP levels in the diet except for OM digestibility. While breed of sheep did not affect nutrient digestibility and UDP levels only affected NDF digestibility. From this study, it is concluded that increasing UDP in the diet did not improve growth performance of sheep. At similar quality of feed the growth performance was affected by breed of sheep in which KG and GL sheep had similar average daily gain (86.01 vs 82.38 g/day). Key Words: Breed of Sheep, Undegradable Protein, Growth, Digestibility
Digestion and ruminal fermentation of cocoa pod silage based ration enriched by gliricidia and calliandra leaves on goats W, Puastuti; Y, Widiawati; E, Wina
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 20, No 1 (2015)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v20i1.1113

Abstract

In term of availability, cacao pod is potential for ruminant feed. According to the nutrients content, cacao pod can be used as fiber source feed. Protein sources materials must be combined when cacao pod was ensilage due to low protein content of this material. The aim of study was to investigate digestibility value and end products of rumen fermentation of goat fed by grass or cacao pod based ration. The study used randomized block design to 20 lambs (16.95 ± 2.36 kg) to evaluated 5 type of rations: R (50% grass + 50% concentrate); S (50% cacao pod silage + 50% concentrate); SG (50% cacao pod-gliricidia silage + 50% concentrate); SK (50% cacao pod-calliandra silage + 50% concentrate) dan SC (50% cacao pod-mixture of gliricidia-calliandra silage + 50% concentrate). Feeding trial was conducted over 15 weeks. Measurements were undertaken on feed digestibility and rumen-fermentation end-products after 3 weeks of the animals treated by treatmets rations. Results shows that nutrients digestibility was different significantly among the groups of treatments (P<0.05). Digestibillity of organic matter, NDF and energy of R ration was higher significantly (P<0.05) than those of other groups. N-ammonia of rumen from goat feed R ration was higher (P<0.05) than other groups. Total VFA and each component were different among the groups (P<0.05), however the value was similar among the groups of cacao pod silage rations. It is concluded that cacao pod silaged based rations enriched by Gliricidia and Calliandra leaves did not produced  similar digestibility value and end products of rumen  fermentation with grass based ration.Key Words: Cacao Pod Silage, Digestibility, Ruminal Fermentation
Digestion and ruminal fermentation of cocoa pod silage based ration enriched by gliricidia and calliandra leaves on goats W, Puastuti; Y, Widiawati; E, Wina
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 20, No 1 (2015)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (201.751 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v20i1.1114

Abstract

In term of availability, cacao pod is potential for ruminant feed. According to its nutrients content, cacao pod can be used as feed fiber source. Protein sources materials must be added when cacao pod was ensilaged due to low protein content of this material. The aim of this study was to investigate digestibility value and end products of rumen fermentation of goat fed grass or cacao pod based ration. Randomized block design and 20 heads of lambs (16.95±2.36 kg) to evaluated 5 type of rations: R (50% grass + 50% concentrate); S (50% cacao pod silage + 50% concentrate); SG (50% cacao pod-gliricidia silage + 50% concentrate); SK (50% cacao pod-calliandra silage + 50% concentrate) dan SC (50% cacao pod-mixture of gliricidia-calliandra silage + 50% concentrate). Feeding trial was conducted for over 15 weeks. Measurements were taken on feed digestibility and rumen-fermentation end-products after 3 weeks of treatments. Results shows that nutrients digestibility was different significantly among the groups of treatments (P<0.05). Digestibillity of organic matter, NDF and energy of R ration was those of higher significantly (P<0.05) than those of other groups. N-ammonia of rumen from goat feed R ration was higher (P<0.05) than other groups. Total VFA and each component were different among the groups (P<0.05), however the value was similar among the groups of cacao pod silage rations. It is concluded that cacao pod silaged based rations enriched by Gliricidia and Calliandra leaves did not produce similar digestibility value and end products of rumen  fermentation with grass based ration. Key Words: Cacao Pod Silage, Digestibility, Ruminal Fermentation
Concentrate supplementation for crossbred bulls to increase profitability of smallholder fattening operations in East Java, Indonesia D, Ratnawati; F, Cowley; D, Mayberry; D, Poppi
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 20, No 1 (2015)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (178.467 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v20i1.1115

Abstract

Growth rates of bulls in Indonesia raised in smallholder fattening systems are generally low due to inadequate nutrition. This study compared bull growth and farmer profit between two feeding management systems, namely traditional feeding (as control) and intervention feeding by supplementation with a high quality concentrate. Bos taurus-Ongole cross bred bulls (n=46) aged 1.5-2 years, owned by smallholder farmers, from two villages in East Java were used in this study. The bulls were divided into two treatment groups; control and intervention. Farmers in the intervention group were provided with a concentrate containing onggok, copra and palm kernel cake. Farmers were instructed to feed 4 kg DM of concentrate/bull/day in addition to their existing roughage diet for 161 days or until sold. No changes were made to the feeding or management of the bulls in the control group. Mostly control group farmers used local forages and agricultural by product as a feed, without any supplementation. The daily feed cost and the cost of 1 kg of liveweight gain was higher in the intervention group (IDR 8827 and IDR 11990, respectively) than that of the control group (IDR 2606 and IDR 5543, respectively). Moreover, the average daily gain of bulls in the intervention group (0.82 kg/bull/day) was higher than that of bulls in the control group (0.52 kg/bull/day), resulting in a greater profit for the fattening period. Daily income minus feed costs was higher for farmers in the intervention group (IDR 24182/day), compared to farmers in the control group (IDR 15774/day). It is concluded that although there were additional costs for feeding high-quality feeds, but higher growth rates of bulls resulted in greater profits for smallholder farmers. Key Words: Feed, Fattening, Beef Cattle, Supplement, Concentrate
Effect of protein levels and Zinc-biocomplex supplementation in concentrate diets on performance of young male goats I, Supriyati; W, Puastuti; IGM, Budiarsana; I-K, Sutama
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 20, No 1 (2015)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (226.503 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v20i1.1116

Abstract

This trial was carried out to investigate effects of protein levels and Zinc biocomplex supplementation in concentrate diets on performances of young male Etawah grade goats. Twenty-four young male goats were divided into four groups and received concentrate diets as follows: R0= 14% crude protein (CP), R1= 18% CP, R2= R0 + 60 ppm Zn and R3= R0 + 120 ppm Zn as Zn biocomplex. Initial live weight was 16.39±2.19 kg. Animals were offered King grass ad libitum and 400 g/h/d of concentrates diets for 16 week trial. The experiment was conducted based on a randomized complete design with four treatments and six replications. The concentrate diets had no significant effect on DM, TDN, NDF and ADF daily intakes (P>0.05) but significantly (P>0.05) influenced the CP and Zn daily intakes, ADG and FCR. The average DMI, TDN, NDF and ADF daily intakes for all treatments were 670, 547, 333 and 229 g, respectively. The CP daily intake for R0, R1, R2 and R3 treatments were 76.33, 91.83, 75.83 and 76.67 g, and the Zn daily intakes were 42.83, 45.50, 68.83 and 91.33 mg, respectively. The ADG for R0, R1, R2 and R3 were 71.65, 79.96, 78.17 and 82.74 g with the FCR values were 9.95, 8.50, 8.44 and 8.06, respectively. The in vivo digestibility of DM, NDF and ADF were not significant (P>0.05) but the digestibility of CP and GE were significant (P<0.05). The highest IOFC value occurred at R3 treatment. In conclusion, the improvement of CP levels from 14% to 18% in diets increased the goat performance and the supplementation of 120 ppm Zn as Zn biocomplex in diet containing 14% CP gave better performance and increased the IOFC value compared to animals receiving 18% level of CP in diet of young male goat. Key Words: Goats, Concentrates, Performances, Protein, Zn Biocomplex
Molting characteristics of crossbreds between Alabio and Pekin ducks T, Susanti; LH, Prasetyo
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 20, No 1 (2015)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (174.296 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v20i1.1117

Abstract

Molting is a problem for duck farmers, during which the ducks stop laying eggs. Molting characteristics may be altered through crossing between non-molting to molting ducks. The purpose of this study was to evaluate molting characteristics of the crossing between Alabio and Pekin ducks. The materials used were 90 female AP (Alabio males x Pekin females) and 90 female PA (Pekin males x Alabio females), 25 female Alabio and 25 female Pekin ducks. The ducks were housed in individual cages at the Indonesian Research Institute for Animal Production, Ciawi Bogor. Variables measured were the length of molting and egg production in 30 weeks, data were analyzed using ANOVA and followed by the estimation of the value of heterosis. Result showed that the molting of Pekin ducks was 71.31±9.36 days, it was longer than Alabio, AP or PA ducks, which were respectively 42.44±8.59, 43.63±4.88 and 49.35±4.85 days (P<0.01). Egg production of Pekin duck (56.41±4.59) was significantly lower (P<0.01) than that of Alabio, AP or PA, which were 72.48±3.24, 83.75±1.39 and 76.12±1.68 respectively. The heterosis of molting period of AP was higher than that of PA (-23.29 vs -13.23%). The heterosis of egg production of AP was higher than PA (29.96 vs 18.12%). It is concluded that the AP crossbred could be utilized as the initial population to produce a superior line characterized by high egg production and controllable molting. Key Words: Duck, Alabio, Pekin, Crossbreds, Molting
Protection level of AI H5N1 vaccine clade 2.1.3 commercial against AI H5N1 clade 2.3.2 virus from Ducks to SPF chicken in laboratory conditions R, Indriani; NLPI, Dharmayanti
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 20, No 1 (2015)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (182.169 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v20i1.1118

Abstract

Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) subtype H5N1 clade 2.3.2 has infected chickens in farms, causing mortality and a decrease in egg production. Vaccination is one of the strategies to control disease of AI subtype H5N1. AI H5N1 clade 2.1.3 vaccine is available commercially. The effectiveness of two vaccines of AI H5N1 clade 2.1.3 (product A and B), and AI H5N1 clade 2.3.2 (Sukoharjo) against AI H5N1 clade 2.3.2 (Sukoharjo) virus SPF chickens was tested in laboratory. Four groups of SPF chickens were used in this study, there were (1) vaccinated with H5N1 clade 2.1.3 (product A), (2) vaccinated with H5N1 clade 2.1.3 (product B), (3) vaccinated with AI H5N1 clade 2.3.2 and (4) unvaccinated (as a control). Each vaccinated group consisted of 10 chicken except 8 chicken for control group. SPF chicken were vaccinated with 1 dose of vaccine at 3 weeks olds, and then after 3 weeks post vaccination (at 6 weeks olds). All group of chicken were challenged with 106 EID50 per 0.1 ml via intranasal. The results showed, chicken vaccinated with H5N1 clade 2.1.3 product A and B gave 100 and 80% protection respectively, but showed challenged virus shedding, whereas vaccine of H5N1 clade 2.3.2 gave 100% protection from mortality and without virus shedding. Vaccines of AI H5N1 clade 2.1.3 product A was better than vaccine product B, and when chicken vaccinated against H5N1 clade 2.3.2, H5N1 clade 2.3.2 vaccine was the best to be used. In order to protect chicken from AI subtype H5N1 clade 2.1.3 and 2.3.2 in the field, a bivalent vaccine of H5N1 clade 2.1.3 and 2.3.2 subtypes should be developed. Key Words: Chicken, HPAI, Local, Vaccine
Performance of EPMp broiler duck fed various levels of lysine during starter period M, Purba; T, Haryati; AP, Sinurat
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 20, No 1 (2015)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v20i1.1119

Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine optimal requirement of lysine of broiler EPMp ducks during starter period. The study was designed in a completely randomized design (CRD) with four dietary treatments, four replications, and each replication consisted of 10 ducks. The treatments were: T1 (ration, with 0.70% digestible lysine); T2 (ration, with 0.85% digestible lysine); T3 (ration, with 1.00% digestible lysine); T4 (ration, with 1.15% digestible lysine). Variables measured were: feed intake, body weight gain and feed conversion ratio (FCR). Results showed that average body weight gain of EPMp broiler ducks was significantly affected (P<0.05) by the level of lysine in the diet, but feed intake and FCR were not significantly (P>0.05) affected. Mean body weight gain of EPMp broiler duck with T4 ration (1.15%) of lysine was significantly higher compared to T3 ration (1.00% of lysine), but between T4 to T1 and T2 treatmeants were not significantly different (P>0.05). T3 treatment compared to T1 and T2 treatments were not significantly different (P>0.05). There is a pattern of decreasing feed consumption and FCR by increasing content of lysine in the diet, protein and lysine consumption during the starter period. It is concluded that administration of digested lysine at 0.70 and 0.85%, protein and metabolized energy respectively by 18% and 2800 kcal/kg EM in feed were considered sufficient to generate performance (feed consumption, body weight gain and FCR) of EPMp broiler ducks in starter period. Key Words: Performance, EPMp Ducks, Lysine, Starter

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