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Contact Name
Ahmadi Riyanto
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medpub@litbang.deptan.go.id
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ahmadi_puslitbangnak@yahoo.com
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Kota bogor,
Jawa barat
INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 21 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 2, No 4 (1998)" : 21 Documents clear
Effects of hormonehCG following injection of estnanate of reproductive performances ofswamp buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) Situmorang, Polmer; Siregar, Abdul Rachman
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 4 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (870.988 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i4.74

Abstract

Low reproductive performance of buffalo resulted the population growth in Indonesia was only slightly increase during the last 50 year. Reproductive performance can be improved by hormone treatment during synchronization . One study was conducted in Porsea and Siborong-borong to see the effects of hormone hCG on the reproductive performances of swamp buffalo . A total of 34 buffaloes were kept in field grazing and commercial concentrate 4 kg/head/day was given for supplementation in 27 buffaloes and the rest 7 buffaloes treated as control with no supplemeniation . Synchronization performed by two intromuscular (IM) injections of2 ml estrumate in 11 days interval . The buffaloes were divided into 2 groups of 16 buffaloes without hCG  (Control group) and 18 buffaloes with hCG (Treated group). Treated group wereinjected with 500 IU hCG intro-muscularly (IM) 24-48 hours following second injection of estrumate . All buffaloes were artificially inseminated (AI) 48 and 72 hours after the second injection of estrumate. Results showed that injection of estrurnate twice in 11 days interval was very effective to synchronize oestrus of buffaloes. The persentage of buffalo showing oestrus was 67 .5 and 85 .3% following 48 and 72 Ins of  thesecond injection of estrumate resfectively . The effectiveness of estrumate was significantly affected by body condition of buffaloes where the persentage of oestrus 48 and 72 hours following estrumate injection was significantly higher (P<0.01) in buffaloes with good body condition than those in poor body condition (74.5 and 92.5% vs 42 .9 and 57 .1%). Injection ofhCG following estrumate increased the percentage of oestrus and pregnancy of buffalo. Percentages of oestrus of buffaloes 48 and 72 hours following estrumate injections was significantly higher (P<0 .01) in hCG treatment (83 .3 and 100%) than those in control groups (68 .8 and 81 .3%) . The pregnancy rate of buffalo with good body condition was significantly higher (P<0.01) in group of buffaloes with hCG than those control groups ( 86 .6 vs 50.0%) . It is concluded that injection of hCG following estrumate can improve the reproductive performance ofswamp buffalo   Keywords : Swamp buffaloes, hCG, oestrus, body condition
Morphological characterization ofMadura Cattle Setiadi, Bambang; Diwyanto, Kusuma
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 4 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (773.495 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i4.75

Abstract

Morphological characterization of Madura cattle in Madura islands was done as an input for "action plans" of national animals genetic resources management according to the global system ofFAO. Assessments were done in Sumenep District and Pamekasan District, East Java. According to the body measurements, Madura cattle can be classified as a small to medium type with withers height of about 120 cm. Because of potential productivity in the limitation of environmental resources, Madura cattle can be classified as a "superior" cattle . Body measurements of Madura cattle in the present study were relatively the same with those of 50 years ago, indicating that there is no breeding improvement activities except natural selection . The variability of body measurements is relatively narrow . Improving productivity by outbreeding is needed . To conserve the unique germ plasm of the Indonesian genotype, such as Madura cattle and a possibility to improve their productivity by a complete prevention of cross breeding in the Madura islands needs further evaluation .   Keywords: Madura cattle, morphological characteristic, conservation
Intravenous glucose infusion affects nitrogen retention in sheep Mahyudin, Prapti
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 4 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (816.796 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i4.76

Abstract

To investigate the effect of intravenous glucose infusion on nitrogen (N) retention, two experiments were conducted in 2 phases . The first phase (Exp 1) was to establish the time required for a stable glucose entry and the second phase (Exp 2) was designed to study the effect of different levels of glucose infusion on N retention . In Exp l, four wethers were used, each prepared with catheters in the left and right jugular veins, continuously fed luceme chaff at calculated maintenance energy level . The animals were infused continuously with saline for 2 days and thereafter with glucose solution at the rate of 21 .8 mmole/h for 6 days and again with saline on the seventh day. Glucose entry rate (GER) were measured using constant infusion of D-[6-H] glucose, on the second day of saline infusion (Day 0) and at the same period each day for the next seven days. Infusion of glucose reduced endogenous glucose entry by 30% on Day 1 and 2, by 13% on Day 3, but by Day 4 onwards endogenous glucose entry had returned to normal levels. Plasma insulin, reached its peak value on the first day of glucose infusion and subsequently declined . Plasma urea concentration declined with ensuing days of glucose infusion . It was concluded that for sheep fed maintenance energy level infused with glucose, it takes approximately 4 days for glucose metabolism to reach equilibrium. In Exp 2, four wethers were used, each prepared with catheters and fed luceme pellets at calculated maintenance energy level . The sheep were infused continuously for five days with glucose at a rate of either 0 (saline), 10, 20 and 30 mmole/h in a Latin Square design (4 infusion rate x 4 periods) . A large increase in endogenous glucose entry was found with the highest level of infusion . Glucose entry rates were 28 .8, 48.3, 54 .7 and 86.1 mmole/h for glucose infusion of 0, 10, 20 and 30 mmole/h respectively . No significant changes in both plasma glucose and urea concentration with infusion rate of glucose. N retention increased with increasing level of glucose infused (P<0.05) and was mainly due to the reduction of urinary N. This experiment suggests the important of glucose in protein deposition   Keywords : Glucose infusion, glucose entry rate, N retention
Reproductive and productive efficiencies of Etawah Grade goats under various mating managements Sunadi, Bambang; Sutama, I-K; Budiarsana, I-G.M
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 4 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (403.438 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i4.77

Abstract

Thirty six Etawah Grade (PE) goats were treated with three type of mating managements, i.e. mated at the first oestrous (A), mated at the second oestrous (B), and mated at the third oestrous (C) after parturition, respectively . Results showed that average first estrous was 56 days (26-99 d) after parturition with estrous cycle of 21 days . Conception rate at the first and second oestrous mating managements (A and B) were 50 and 70%, respectively . Variability of birth weight (3,4 - 3,5 kg) under three mating managements were not significantly different (P>0 .05), but the weaning weight of kids of B (16 .4 kg) was higher (P<0.05) than A (11 .8 kg) and C (12.9 kg), respectively. Does productivity (total weaning weight) was not significantly affected by mating management, i.e. at fisrt, second or third oestrous after parturition .   Keywords : Goats, mating management, productivity
Effect of various dietary nutrient density on the growth performance of local male ducks and their crosse Bintang, I.A.K; Silalahi, M; ., Antawidjaja; Raharjo, Y.C
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 4 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (581.682 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i4.78

Abstract

Three hundred day-old male ducklings were allocated randomly into 12 treatment combinations in 3 x 4 factorial design . Three levels of dietary density ration i.e : Low(12% /2,000 kcal), medium (16%/2,500 kcal) and high (20%/3,000 kcal) and 2 breeds of local ducks Tegal (TT) and Mojosari (MM) and their crossbreds (Tegal x Mojosari (TM) and Mojosari x Tegal (MT)) were applied. Each treatment combination consisted of5 replicates, each of 5 birds. The experiment was carried out for 8 weeks and measurements were weekly feed intake, body weight, weight and/or percentage of carcass, internal organs and abdominal fat. Results indicated that no significant interaction was detected between dietary nutrient density and the breeds of ducks on all parameters measured . Breeds of duck, as well as their crosses did not affect growth performance and other parameters . On the other hand, nutrient density influenced growth performance significantly, except for percentage of carcass and internal organs . In general, feed intake, body weight gain, feed efficiency, carcass weight and abdominal fat of ducks fed low density ration were significantly lower than those fed medium density, which were also lower than those fed high nutrient density diet . Weghtand length of intestine and kidney weight, of ducks fed low density diet however, were higher than the two other treatments .   Keywords : Dietary density ration, breeds of duck, growth
Alley cropping of legumes with grasses as forages : Effect of different grass species and row spacing of gliricidia on the growth and biomass production of forages Yuhaeni, Siti; Suratmini, N.P; Purwantari, N.D; Manurung, T; Sutedi, E
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 4 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (851.476 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i4.79

Abstract

A study to evaluate the effect of different grass species and row spacing of gliricidia (Gliricidia sepium) on the growth and biomass production of forages in an alley cropping system was conducted in two different agroclimatical zones i.e. Bogor, located at 500 m a .s .l . with an average annual rainfall of 3,112 nun/year and Sukabumi located at 900 m a .s .l . with an average annual rainfall of 1,402 mm/year . Both locations have low N, P, and K content and the soil is classified as acidic. The experimental design used was a split plot design with 3 replicates . The main plots were different grass species i.e. king grass  (Pennisetum purpureum x P. typhoides) and elephant grass (P. purpureum). The sub plots were the row spacing of gliricidia at 2, 3, 4, 6 m (1 hedgerows) and 4 m (2 hedgerows). The results indicated that the growth and biomass production of grasses were significantly affected (P<0 .05) by the treatments in Bogor. The highest biomass productions was obtained from the 2 m row spacing which gave the highest dry matter production of grasses (1 .65 kg/hill) and gliricidia (0 .086 kg/tree) . In Sukabumi the growth and biomass production of grasses and gliricidia were also significantly affected by the treatments . The highest dry matter production was obtained with 2 m row spacing (dry matter of grasses and gliricidia were 1 .12 kg/hill and 0 .026 kg/tree, respectively) . The result further indicated that biomass production of forages increased with the increase in gliricidia population. The alley cropping system wich is suitable for Bogor was the 2 m row spacing of gliricidia intercropped with either king or elephant grass and for  Sukabumi 2 and 4 m (2 rows of gliricidia) row spacing intercropped with king or elephant grass .   Keywords : Alley cropping, grasses, legumes, row spacing
Studies on the susceptibility of ostriches (Struthio camelus) to the Indonesian velogenic strain of Newcastle disease virus ., Darminto; Bahri, Sjamsul
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 4 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (876.974 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i4.80

Abstract

Susceptibility of ostriches (Struthio camelus) to the Indonesian velogenic strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) was evaluated by artificial infection . Twelve - 5 to 6 week old ostriches were divided into 3 groups each containing 4 birds . The first group was inoculated through respiratory system by dropping directly the virus solution into the nostrils, while the second group was inoculated through digestive system by dropping directly the virus solution into the oesophagus, with the dose of infection 106ELDSo (50%-embryo lethal dose) per bird . Meanwhile, the third group was treated as uninfected control . All infected birds developed antibody responses, but only two inoculated birds from the first group and two inoculated birds from the second group developed clinical signs of Newcastle disease (ND), with no specific pathological alterations . Infected birds, either sicks or healthy, excreted the challenge viruses through the respiratory system and still be detected up to the end of this experiment, ie . 15 days post-inoculation . The challenge viruses can be re-isolated from the brain, trachea, lungs, heart, liver, spleen, kidneys, small intestine, cecal-tonsil, and proventriculus of the infected birds . This study concludes that: (1) the ostriches are susceptible to the infection of the Indonesian velogenic strain ofNDV; (2) all infected birds developed immune responses, but only half of them develops el jtigi aj i disease ; (3) the infected birds excreted the challenge viruses for a considerable long time which may play role as the Mginiseti.ce ofinfectron the other healthy ostriches ; and (4) the challenge viruses can be re-isolated from various organs of the birds . .   Keywords : Newcastle disease vir4, 9strich, immune response, artificial infection
Antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using monoclonal antibody for detection of bluetongue virus antigen An Sendow, Indrawati
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 4 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (513.237 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i4.81

Abstract

antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a specific anti-bluetongue virus group was applied to detect bluetongue viral antigen . The test was specific for bluetongue viruses and did not detect the closely related epizootic haemorrhagic disease of deer viruses (EHDV) and other orbiviruses . It was easy to perform and could be established in laboratories which have simple facilities . The antigen-capture ELISA technique is an alternative method to agar gel immunodiffusion and immuno-dot blotting tests to detect bluetongue antigen in infected tissues, Vero cells, Aedes albopictus cells and BHK-21 cell cultures .   Keywords : ELISA, monoclonal antibody, antigen detection, BT
Haemophilus paragallinarum in chickens in Indonesia : II . Physiological and biochemical properties of Haemophilus spp . from diseased chickens Poernomo, Sri; ., Sutama; Nazrudin, Yapto
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 4 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (412.386 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i4.82

Abstract

A total of 46 isolates of Haemophilus spp . consisted of 42 local isolates from diseased chickens and four reference strains of Haemophilus paragallinarum were examined for their physiological and biochemical properties . These isolates consisted of 2 groups. One group consisted of 21 local isolates and reference strains of H. paragallinarum were catalase negative and identified as Haemophilus paragallinarum and they did not ferment galactose and trehalose . The other group was catalase positive and suspected as Haemophilus avium . This catalase positive group of these 21 avian Haemophili should be examined with other carbohydrates in order to be identified accurately .   Keywords : Haemophilus spp ., physiological, biochemical, chickens
Haemophilus paragallinarum in chickens in Indonesia: III. Antimicrobial drug sensitivity test ofHaemophilus paragallinarum from chickens suffering of coryza Poernomo, Sri; Sutarma, Sutarma; Dewi Silawatri, Sang Ayu Ketut
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 4 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (292.846 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i4.83

Abstract

An agar disc diffusion method was used to examine the sensitivity of 27 Haemophilus paragallinarum (Hpg) isolates consisted of 23 local isolates, 4 standard isolates (serotype A) and Escherichia coli ATCC 24922 as a control to eight antimicrobial drugs (ampicillin, erythromycin, oxytetracycline, doxycycline, neomycin, streptomycin, colistine and sulphanlethoxazole-trimethoprim) . Twenty one out of 23 local isolates of Hpg were sensitive to doxycycline, 19 isolates to ampsllin, 18 isolates to oxytetracycline, 17 isolates to sulphametoxazole-trimethoprim, 16 isolates to erythromycin, and 13 isolates to neomycin, while 13 isolates were resistance to colistine and 11 isolates were also resistance to streptomycin .   Keywords : Haemophilus paragallinarum, chicken, coryza, sensitivity test, antimicrobial drug

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