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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 20 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 2, No 2 (1996)" : 20 Documents clear
Growth performance of FH male calves fed milk replacer made of local ingredients for veal production Wina, Elizabeth; Mathius, I-Wayan; Tangendjaja, Budi
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 2 (1996)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (774.042 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i2.49

Abstract

The research was designed to evaluate the local feedstuff to be used in milk replacer (MP) and its utilization for veal production . Fifteen male calves of the Friesian Holstein breed, 5-6 weeks old were used in the experiment lasting for 8 weeks. The treatments were (i) commercial milk replacer (SPK), (ii) local (SPL-1) and (iii) mixture ofSPK and SPL-1 (SPKL). The amount of dry matter offerred is 3 % of live weight each and was given twice daily (in the morning and late afternoon) . Elephant grass (0 .5 kg) was offerred at noon . The observed parameters were average daily gain (ADG), dry matter (DM) and crude protein (CP) intake, carcass percentage, weight of carcass components, physical and chemical characteristics of meat. The results show that feed consumptions were 1,981, 1,613 and 1,050 g1day and ADGs were 897,496 and 73 g for treatments SPK, SPKL and SPL, respectively . Carcass percentage was 56.84 and 58 .76% with protein content was 87 .47 and 84 .78% for treatments  SPK and SPKL, respectively . The benefit per head of calf was higher when fed mixture of local and commercial MP than fed only commercial MP but the benefit per day was higher when fed commercial MP than mixture of local and commercial. In conclusion, a cheaper milk replacer with less milk protein content resulting in a lower gain but higher benefit per head of calf than a commercial milk replacer containing high milk protein content   Key words : veal, male calves, milk replacer
Strategic study on energy-protein requirements for local sheep : 1 . Growing phase Mathius, I-Wayan; Martawidjaja, M; Wilson, A; Manurung, T
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 2 (1996)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (790.597 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i2.50

Abstract

Fourty, thin-tail lambs (mean BW 13 .8 ± 1 .1 kg) were used in an experiment to measure energy and protein requirements. Lambs were divided into four dietary treatments in a 2 x 2 x 2 factorial design in which the factors were sex (male vs female), energy levels (high vs low) and crude protein (high vs low) . Metabol izable energy (ME) and crude protein (CP) requirements were measured by regression technique, using data collected during the experiment . Results showed that combination of low protein and high energy diet gave the highest response, i.e . 112 g daily gain with better feed convertion, i .e . 5 .4 . Equation models developed to predict ME and CP requirements were EM (MJ/head) = -11 .9266 - 0 .6487 BW °." (kg) + 38 .48 ADG (kg) + 4 .6887 log ME/CP (J/g) and CP (kg/head) = 8 .14766 - 0.10642 BW "5 (kA+ 6 .05777 ADG (kg) - 1 .39541 log ME/CP (J/g) . Predicted ME and CP requirement, for maintenance were 482 kJ/kg BW 0.75 and 5 .14g/kg BW 5 respectively .   Key words: Energy, crude protein, sheep, growing phase
The performance of male duck fed different levels of crude palm oil Bintang, I.A.K; Tangendjaja, Budi
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 2 (1996)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (481.274 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i2.51

Abstract

An experiment was conducted to evaluate the optimum level of inclusion of crude palm oil (CPO) in ducks diet . The treatments consisted of 5 different levels ofCPO (0, 5, 10, 15 and 20%) with 5 replicates and 10 day-old ducks/replicate. The ducklings were allocated in litter system covered with rice hull . At 0-3 weeks old, ducklings were fed with starter commercial diet . The experiment diet was given to starter (3 - 5 weeks old) and to grower (5-8 weeks old) ducks containing crude protein 19 .5 and 17%, respectively and metabolizable energy 2,900 kcal/kg. Measurements done were on body weight, feed consumption, carcass weight, internal organ and abdominal fats . There were no significant difference among treatments on body weight gain, feed consumption, feed conversion, carcass or internal organ weight . There was an increase on abdominal fat with an increase level ofCPO in the diet. Male duck had the ability to accept up 20% CPO in the diet without any negative effect.   Key words: Performance, male duck, crude palm oil
Comparative evaluation of different soybean meal and the replacement using peanut, rapeseed and fish meal for broilers . Tangendjaja, Budi; Bintang, I.A.K
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 2 (1996)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (590.793 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i2.52

Abstract

Two feeding experiments have been conducted to test the different sources of soybean meal (local, India, USA) and the partial substitution with peanut meal (10%), rapeseed meal (5%) and fish meal (5%) in the diet for broiler. The first feeding experiment was carried out on broiler starter for 4 weeks in wire cages . Twelve rations in factorial design (3 x 4) were conducted using 6 birds/cage and replicated 6 times . Birds fed India soybean meal had significantly less body weight (1,000 g) than those fed local or USA soybean meals (1,037 and 1,023 g, respectively) . Partial substitution with peanut, rapeseed or fish meal did not affect body weight, feed consumption or feed/gain ratio . The average consumption and feed/gain were 1,535 g and 1,569, respectively . In second experiment, one thousand five hundred broiler chicks were allocated in 6 dietary treatments in factorial design (3 x 2) . Factor one was different sources of soybean meal (local, India and USA) and factor two was the inclusion of peanut meal at 0 and 10%. Birds were kept on litter system for 6 weeks . Each treatment used 5 replicates and 50 birds/replicate . The results show no effect of the treatment to any parameter measured . Body weight of bird fed local, India and USA soybean meal were 1,662, 1,641 and 1,669 g and feed/gain were 2 .043, 2 .051 and 2.035, respectively . Cost analysis indicates that ration uses local soybean meal gives a higher cost than those of India and USA soybean meals.   Key words : Soybean meal, peanut meal, rapeseed meal, fish meal, broiler  
The utilization of rock phosphate (natural defluorinated calcium phosphate or NDCP) in laying hens diet to replace dicalcium phosphate Sinurat, A.P; Dharsana, R; Pasaribu, T; Panggabean, T; Habiebie, A
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 2 (1996)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i2.53

Abstract

An experimentwas conducted to study the utilization of local rock phosphate or natural defluorinated calcium phosphate (NDCP) as phosphorus source for layer chickens by using the imported dicalcium phosphate (DCP) as a reference. Eight experimental diets consisted of 2 source of phosphorus (DCP and NDCP) and 4 dietary total P levels (0.4, 0.5, 0.6 and 0.7%) were formulated. Each diet was fed to 24 pullets (6 replicates with 4 birds each) from 20 weeks of age to 14 weeks of egg production. Observations were made on feed consumption, egg production, egg weight, mortality, egg quality, Ca and P retention and ash content of tibial bones . Results showed no significant effect of different source and level of phosphorus tested on egg production (% HD), feed consumption, egg weight and mortality rates . Egg shell thickness was depressed in NDCP diet as compared with DCP, however this only occurred at firstmonth of production. It is concluded that the NDCP can be used in layers diet to replace DCP as phosphorus source. The relative biological value of phosphorus inNDCP is 96% for layers. Keywords: Rock phosphate, NDCP, layers, phosphorous (NDCP) as phosphorus source for layer chickens by using the imported dicalcium phosphate (DCP) as a reference. Eight experimental diets consisted of 2 source of phosphorus (DCP and NDCP) and 4 dietary total P levels (0.4, 0.5, 0.6 and 0.7%) were formulated. Each diet was fed to 24 pullets (6 replicates with 4 birds each) from 20 weeks of age to 14 weeks of egg production. Observations were made on feed consumption, egg production, egg weight, mortality, egg quality, Ca and P retention and ash content of tibial bones . Results showed no significant effect of different source and level of phosphorus tested on egg production (% HD), feed consumption, egg weight and mortality rates . Egg shell thickness was depressed in NDCP diet as compared with DCP, however this only occurred at firstmonth of production. It is concluded that the NDCP can be used in layers diet to replace DCP as phosphorus source. The relative biological value of phosphorus inNDCP is 96% for layers. Keywords: Rock phosphate, NDCP, layers, phosphorous
The utilization of rock phosphate (natural defluorinated calcium phosphate or NDCP) in laying hens diet to replace dicalcium phosphate Sinurat, A.P; Dharsana, R; Pasaribu, T; Panggabean, T; Habiebie, A
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 2 (1996)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (801.12 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i2.54

Abstract

An experimentwas conducted to study the utilization of local rock phosphate or natural defluorinated calcium phosphate (NDCP) as phosphorus source for layer chickens by using the imported dicalcium phosphate (DCP) as a reference. Eight experimental diets consisted of 2 source of phosphorus (DCP and NDCP) and 4 dietary total P levels (0.4, 0.5, 0.6 and 0.7%) were formulated. Each diet was fed to 24 pullets (6 replicates with 4 birds each) from 20 weeks of age to 14 weeks of egg production. Observations were made on feed consumption, egg production, egg weight, mortality, egg quality, Ca and P retention and ash content of tibial bones . Results showed no significant effect of different source and level of  phosphorus tested on egg production (% HD), feed consumption, egg weight and mortality rates . Egg shell thickness was depressed in NDCP diet as compared with DCP, however this only occurred at firstmonth of production. It is concluded that the NDCP can be used in layers diet to replace DCP as phosphorus source. The relative biological value of phosphorus inNDCP is 96% for layers.   Keywords: Rock phosphate, NDCP, layers, phosphorous
Effects of grazing systems on pasture production and quality of Brachiaria brizantha and liveweight gain of lambs . Ginting, Simon P; Pond, K.R
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 2 (1996)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (477.876 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i2.55

Abstract

Grazing cycle beyond parasite survival time can reduce the level of parasite contamination, but at the same time it may depress the quality of available forage for animal production . A study was conducted to evaluate the effects of grazing management systems on the production and quality of Brachiaria brizantha and the performance of lamb grazing this pasture . A total of 72 male lambs aged from 3 to 4 months were used . The lambs were divided into 3 groups and randomly allocated to receive one of the following grazing treatments : GMl-pastures were grazed for 6 weeks and then rested for 6 weeks, GM2-pastures were grazed for 1 week and then rested for 6 weeks, and GM3-pastures were grazed for 12 weeks and then rested for 12 weeks . The herbage mass measured before and after grazing was greatest (P<0.01) forGM3. Canopy compositions before grazing   as not different (P>0 .10) among the three grazing methods, while after grazing, the proportion of stem fraction was highest and leaf fraction was lowest for GM3 (P<0 .01) . The in vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD) of plucked samples were not different (P>0 .10) among the grazing methods. The crude protein (CP) concentration was lower (P<0 .05) for GM3 as compared for GM 1 and GM2, and a difference of two percentage unitmay be of biological important. The changes in IVDMD and CP concentration of the plucked samples collected throughout grazing cycle remained reasonably steadily . Average daily gains (ADG) were low and not different (P>0 .10) across grazing treatment and ranged from 29 to 35 g. It was concluded that a 12-week grazing cycle while could increase the herbage mass of Brachiaria brizantha did not decrease feed intake, the digestibility and the crude protein concentration of the consumed forage . Therefore, this gazing system could be considered as a means to control parasite establishment on pastures.   Key words : Grazing systems, herbage mass, forage quality, sheep
Effects of grazing management and levels of concentrate supplementation on parasite establishment in two genotypes of lambs infected with Haemonchus contortus Ginting, Simon P; Pond, K.R; ., Subandriyo
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 2 (1996)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (759.806 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i2.56

Abstract

The effects of grazing systems, levels of feed supplementation and genotypes of sheep on the establishment ofHaemonchus contortus were studied in 36 St . Croix x Sumatra crosses (HC) and 36 Sumatra (S) male lambs . The lambs were artificially infected with Haemonchus larvae (L3) at a rate of 3,000 L3 per animal and fed concentrate supplement at 0 .5% body weight (BW) or at 1 .6% BW. The animals grazed clean Brachiaria brizantha pastures . Lambs grazing GM1 (grazing system with a 6-week rotational cycle) had egg counts of 3,936 t 1 .525 at week 18, and 29% of the lambs had PCV ranging from 7 .8 to 14 .6% . Lambs in GM3 (grazing system with a 12-week grazing cycle) had egg counts of 6,714 t 2,075 at week 28, and 24%ofthe lambs had PCV ranging from 7 .9 to 13.3% At these periods, all lambs in both GMI and GM3 were dosed with anthelmintics to prevent the death of the animals . Although the overall mean egg counts (4,543 t 318) of lambs on GM2 (grazing system with a  1-week grazing and 6-week resting periods) were higher (P<0 .001) than on GMI (2,944 t 325) or on GM3 (2,159 t 418), it was achieved without dosing with anthelmintics, since only I 1%ofthe Iambs in GM2ever reached PCV values less than 15%. Lambs fed supplements at 1.6%BW had lower (P<0.001) egg counts and higher (P<0 .001) PCV and serum protein than lambson 0.5 %BW supplement group . Egg counts and PCV values were not different (P>0 .10) between HC and the S lambs when fed supplement at 0.5% BW, but on 1 .6% supplement BW group, the egg counts were lower (P<0.001) in HC. It is concluded that a one-week grazing and a six- week resting system was superior than grazing systems with a 6- or 12-week rotational cycle . Improving the nutritional status of lambs by increasing the level of supplement offered could depress the establishment of Haemonchus in the Iambs . The HC and S lambs showed similar response to supplements at 0 .5% BW, but at 1 .6% BW the HC responded better than the S.   Key words: Grazing management, Haemonchus contortus, feed supplement, sheep
Phenotypic detection ofT lymphocyte subsets in Bali cattle lymph nodes with malignant catarrhal fever by immunohistochemical techniques Damayanti, Rini
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 2 (1996)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1038.111 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i2.57

Abstract

A study was carried out to detect the phenotype ofT cell subsets in six Bali cattle affected with malignant catarrhal fever (MCF). This was performed by means of immunohistochemical technique using avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex methods. Seven monoclonal antibodies against lymphocyte surface antigen were used to detect T cell subsets ie . CD1, CD2, CD4, CD5, CD8, CD45, and WC 1. The results showed that the subsets were all detected either in the MCFor non-MCF infected Bali cattle lymph nodes. However, CD8 was more predominantly occupied in the MCF Bali cattle . This indicated that CD8 was a cytotouic Tlymphocytes and acted as potential mediators for immunopathological process in MCF.   Keywords : Malignant catarrhal fever, Tlymphocyte subsets, Bali cattle, immunohistochemical technique
Anthrax retrospective analysis in endemic areas using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) Hardjoutomo, S; Poerwadikarta, M.B
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 2 (1996)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (488.731 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i2.58

Abstract

About the end of 1995, an infectious disease among buffaloes as well as human beings was reported to occur in the District of Ngada, East Nusatenggara . Specimens of death animals, namely a piece of bones, hide, soil samples as well as blood and exudate smears and sera of the local inhabitants were submitted to Balitvet, Bogor laboratory for diagnosis . Bacteriological examinations of those specimens revealed that B. Anthracis was the causative agent of the disease . Along the line, 40 humans sera comprised 20 sera of local exposed inhabitants and 20 sera of non-exposed outsider, examined by the antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) confirmed the diagnosis . It was concluded that antibody ELISA is one of diagnosis tools for analyzing of an anthrax outbreak in the field .   Keywords : Anthrax, retrospective analysis, antibody ELISA; serum

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