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Contact Name
Ahmadi Riyanto
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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 21 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 2, No 1 (1996)" : 21 Documents clear
Utilization of FecJ F gene in developing commercial sheep farming : Economic analysis Priyanti, Atien; Inonou, I; Tiesnamurti, B
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 1 (1996)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (888.887 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i1.37

Abstract

An increase of income per capita in Indonesia is not followed by an increase of numbers and quality of lambs stock. To meet he high demand both for domestic and international markets, sheep production should be elaborated commercially . The Research Institute for Animal Production, Bogor has been able to identify the segregation of FecJ F on Javanese sheep, which has large effect on ovulation rate and number of litters born. The study was purposed to analyse the economic value of using Fed gene and the crossing with St. Croix rams to obtain high number of lamb production as well as high pre-weaning growth rate . Sixty seven Garut ewes were used and classified into three classes of singles, twins and triplets or mom: lambs born . From each litter type, ewes were classified according to the breed of rams to be used . Gamt and St . Croix rams were  used to represent small and large size of sires, respectively . The parameters observed were litter size, birth weight, sex, feed consumption, weaning weight and average daily gain . Lambs and ewes were weighed on biweekly and monthly basis, respectively. An increasing of input for single born ewes was not followed by dramatic increase in its body weight at weaning, which means that the optimum level of production was not achieved. This resulted a shortening of farmers income. However, for ewes having twins an increase of input was followed by significantly increased of production level . Therefore, the economic analysis model used for ewes that carry the Fed gene showed an increase of income of Rp.30,691 .50, and Rp.24,319.82, per ewe per period for St. Croix sires and Garut sires, respectively .   Key words: Economic analysis, Fed gene, sheep
Effect of pregnant mare serum gonadotrophin injection on litter size in young Etawah-cross does Artiningsihi, N.M; Purwantara, B; Achjadi, R.K; Sutama, I-K
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 1 (1996)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (581.164 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i1.38

Abstract

The incidence of twins and/or multiple births in 20 heads of young Etawah-cross does was studied following oestrous synchronization using intravaginal sponges containing 60 mg medroxyprogesterorle acetate (Repromap) for 15 days . Twenty four hours priorto sponges withdrawal, the does were injected with pregnant mare serum gonadotrophin (PMSG) at dose rates of 0 (Group A), 10 (Group B), 15 (Group C) and 20 iu/kg (Group D) body weight. Amature buck fitted with an apron was used to detect the onset of oestrus at every four hours. The oestrous doe was naturally mated twice, 12 hours after onset of oestrus and 10 hours later. About 3-5 days after oestrus, all does were subjected to mid-ventral laparoscopy to detect ovulation rate . Two months after mating all does were subjected to pregnancy test using diagnostic ultrasonography. Results showed that all does exhibited clear sign of oestrus. The onset of oestrus occurred 15-43 hours after sponges withdrawal or 39-59 hours after PMSG injection. Does injected with PMSG (Groups B, C and D) showed oestrus 16-21 hours earlier (P<0.05), and it was 1 .6-4.8 hours longer (P>0 .05) than that of control (Group A) . However, there was no significant differences among the PMSG-treated groups . Ovulation rates increased from 1.0 in Group Ato 1.8 in Group B and 2.6 in bah Groups Cand D. Average litter size in Groups A, B, C and D were 1.0, 1.8, 2.4 and 1.0, respectively. It was concluded that injection of 15 iu PMSG/kg body weight gave the best result for increasing litter size in young Etawah-cross does .   Key words: Etawah-cross, PMSG, synchronization, reproduction
The effects of saponin from Sapindus rarak fruit on rumen microbes and performance of sheep Thalib, Amlius; Widiawati, Y; Hamid, H; Suherman, D; Sabrani, M
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 1 (1996)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (434.975 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i1.39

Abstract

Eighteen local sheep weighing approximately 15 kg were randomly divided into 3 treatment groups . All animals received a mixture of elephant and native grasses (50 :50) ad libitum + concentrate (0.5% of liveweight) . The treatments given were : (1) no additive, (II) addition of placebo and (III) addition of methanol-extracted Sapindus rarak fruit (MES) at level of 0.07% of liveweight. Placebo and MES were given orally every 3 days . Feeding treatments were conducted for 14 weeks . Rumen liquor of all animals were collected in the third week "and observed for rumen ecosystem and ruminal digestibility . Bodyweight gain and feed consumption were measured . The results showed that MES eliminates the protozoal population by 57% and sequently increases bacterial population by 69% when compared to control (1). Lowered protozoa population has no effect on lactic acid and total volatile fatty acids productions, and a consequence, does not change pH (Pa0.05) . However, lowered protozoa population decreased NH3-N content (P<0 .05) . Cumulative gas production resulting from substrate (rice straw) fermented by rumen liquor from sheep fed MES-added diet (III) increased by 13% when compared to control (1)). Compared to control (I), average daily gain of sheep fed MES-added diet (111) is increased by 44% with an improved efficiency by 28%.   Keywords : Saponin, protozoa, bacteria, performance of sheep
Etabolism in compensatory growth . III. The urea, glucose and C02 entry rates in animal undergoing compensatory growth Mahyudin, Pram; Teleni, E
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 1 (1996)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1058.554 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i1.40

Abstract

Glucose (GER), Urea (UER) and C02 (C02 ER) entry rates were studied at four points in the growth curve viz: before feed restriction (PI) after 8 weeks of feed restriction (P2), after 3 weeks (P3) and 15 weeks (P4) following resumption ofad libitum feeding. Sixteen Merino wethers were used and offerred pelleted lucerne (Medicago sativa) ad libitum for 3 weeks; then they were divided into 2 groups of eight. Group I continued to be fed ad libitum and Group 11 was fed pelleted lucerne at half maintenance level for 8 weeks and then fed ad libitum until the end of experiment. During feed restriction (P2), UER, urinary urea and urea transferred from the blood to the gut were 74% lower in group II than those in group I due to the reduction of N intake . At P2 GER and C02ER were also lower (53% and 56%, respectively) because of the reduction of available glucose precursor and metabolic rate. Similarly AV concentration difference of glucose, glucose taken up by the hind-limb muscle and the percentage of glucose taken up by muscle that was oxidised were reduced by 52%, 86% and 48%, respectively . When animals resumed ad libitum feeding, the components of urea entry rate (except plasma urea concentration), GER and C02ER were markedly increased indicating A switch to the anabolic mode, followed by increased glucose taken up and oxidised by the hind-limb muscle . The significance of glucose in muscle metabolism during compensatory growth was shown in the dramatic increase in the actual rate of glucose oxidation per unit muscle weight . It appears that the priority of usage of glucose taken up by muscle during compensatory growth is for oxidation to both C02 and lactate.   Key words: Glucose entry rate, C02 entry rate, plasma urea
The improvement of rice straw quality by urea-molasses treatment Manurung, Tambak; Zulbardi, Muhammad
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 1 (1996)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (506.206 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i1.41

Abstract

A study was conducted in Balai Penelitian Temak Bogor to evaluate the effect of urea-molasses treatment on the quality of rice straw . Five levels of urea were 0%, 0.5%, 1%, 1 .5% and 2% and 4 levels of molasses were 0%, I%, 2% and 3%. The study was conducted based on factorial completely randomized design with 3 replications . Urea and molasses were mixed with 5 kg chopped rice straw and stored for 21 days in plastic bag . Parameters observed were dry matter, organic matter, crude protein, crude fibre, and silica contents . Nutritive value of rice straw was measured by proximate analysis and its nutrient digestibility by in-vitro using rumen liquid of fistulated Ongole-crossed cattle . The results showed that urea and molasses treatment on rice straw decreased the dry matter and silica contents but increased the crude protein content of rice straw (P<0 .01). Dry matter and organic matter digestibility of rice straw didnt show the significant different among urea treatment but highly significant increased (P<0.01) by the molasses treatment. It was concluded that urea and molasses treatment on rice straw could improve the quality so that by the levels of 1 .5% urea and 3% molasses produced the similar quality with napier grass .   Key words: Rice straw, urea, molasses,nutritive value
The isolation of Gurnbiro virus from larvae and darkling Ivelles (Carcinops pumilin) Parede, Lies; Indriani, Risa; ., Sukarsih
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 1 (1996)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (472.359 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i1.42

Abstract

Gumboro (infectious bursal disease, IBD) virus was isolated from darkling beetles (Carrinaps pumilin) and their larvae in a commercial pulletchicken farm with repeated outbreaks incidence of Gumboro disease in Tangertng, West Java. In addition, these over populated beetles and their larvae were suspected to be infected and then shed the virus or acted as vectors. Isolation was done by repeated passages of virus using chicken embryo fibroblast cells as prime media, which then showed the evidence of cylop: ihic effecis. The isolation was followed by antigen detection by means of ELISA test.   Key words: Gumboro disease, infectious bursal disease, darkling beetle, Carcinops punulin  
Inactive vaccine derived from velogenic strain of local Newcastle disease virus . ., Darminto; Ronohardjo, P
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 1 (1996)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (717.318 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i1.43

Abstract

The objective of this research is to evaluate an application of an inactive Newcastle disease (ND) vaccine derived from velogenic strain of local Newcastle disease virus (NDV). In this research . the Ira strain of velogenic ND virus was grown in specific pathogen free (SPF) eggs and then was inactivated by formalin at a final concentration of 1 :1,000 at 4°C. The inactive antigen was then emulsified with an oil adjuvant or aluminium hydroxide gel before being administered for vaccination in layers and compared to a commercial inactive ND vaccine . Results indicated that application of these inactivated ND vaccines for booster vaccination following vaccination with an active lentogenic ND virus in pullets nearly producing eggs, resulted in high antibody titre which persisted for considerable long period of time and capable of protecting layers from sick of ND and from reducing egg production . Hence, it could be concluded that the inactivated vaccine emulsified in either oil-adjuvant (lanolin-paraffin) or aluminium hydroxide gel were considered to be highly immunogenic and capable of protecting layers from sick of  ND and from reducing egg production   Keywords : Newcastle disease, inactive vaccine, oil adjuvant . aluminium hydroxide, immunogenicity, protection
Dileclion of pathogenic bacteria and mycoplasmas from pneumonic lungs of pigs and histopalhological finding Chotiah, Siti; ., Sobironingsih
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 1 (1996)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (409.647 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i1.44

Abstract

A total of 104 pigs lung samples with pneumonic lesions were collected from Kapuk abattoir in West Jakarta and piggeries in Tangerang, West Java. Isolation and identification of pathogenic bacteria and mycoplasmas of the lung were carried out and Mycoplarma sp . was isolated from 9 (8.7%) samples, Pacteurella multocida from 5 (4.8%)samples, and Bordetella brornrhiseptica from 2 (1 .9%) samples while the test of the samples were negative . Histopathological examination were also carried out and the lesions were found on 30 (28.8%) samples for Bordetella sp., 6 (5 .8%) samples for Mycoplarma sp ., 16 (15.4%) samples for Mycoplarma sp . in combination with Bordetella sp ., 25 (24.0%) samples for Mycoplavma sp . in combination with Pacteurella sp. and 27 (26.0 %) samples were judged to be normal . All microorganisms were found 68 .7% and 72.7% from apical lobes of the lung by bacteriological and histopathological examinations respectively .   Keywords: Mycoplavma sp ., Pacteurella nrulttwida, Bordetella brimrhiseprica, pneumonia, pig
Prevention of enterotoxacmiu in transported cattle Natalia, Lily; ., Sudarisman; Darodjat, M
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 1 (1996)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (582.463 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i1.45

Abstract

Fatal enterotoxaemia of transported cattle is frequently reported in Indonesiu. Acute enteritis and fatal enterotoxaemia of cattle and buffaloes in Indonesia are associated with toxigenic Clostridium perfringenr type A. The outbreaks could have been caused by some kinds of stress, such as a possible change in nutrition or management as well as transportation . To reduce mortality rate caused by enterotoxaemia, an effective vaccine against the disease was produced . The vaccine was made in an alum precipitated toxoid form, prepared from Clostridlumperfringens type A  toxin, which was then tested for safety in mice and for its capacity in generating high immunity in cattle. The vaccine was then used to immunise transported cattle as an attempt to reduce mortality rate and to observe antibody response of cattle following vaocletdon. The results showed that mortality in vaccinated was lower than in non-vaccinated groups of cattle. From field observation, it was obvious that alum precipitated toxoid vaccine could produce good immune response against enterotoxaemia in cattle . It was also evidence that this vaccine could reduce mortality in transported cattle .   Keywords: Enterotoxaemia, vaccine, transportation, cattle
The detection of K88, K99 fimbrial antigen and enterotoxin genes of Escherichia coli isolated from piglets and calves with diarrhoea in Indonesia ., Supar
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 1 (1996)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (602.622 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i1.46

Abstract

Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains cause diarrhoeal disease in piglets and calves in Indonesia. These strains possess two virulence factors namely attachment and enterotoxin antigens . These factors could be detected phenotypically and genetically. Haemolytic Escherichia coli (E coli) isolates possessing K88 fimbrial antigen associated with 0-group 108 and 149. They were positive for K88 gene and demonstrated their ability to produce heat labile enterotoxin (LT) and genetically were all positive for LT gene . Seventeen isolates ofE coli K88 which associated with 0-group 149 were positive forSTb gene, other O-serotypes were negative . Ten isolates of Ecoli K88 which associated with 0-group 108 possessed K88, K99, LT and STa genes, but negative for STb gene . However, phenotypically the K99 antigen and STa toxin were not expressed under laboratory conditions, the reason was not well understood . E. coli K99 strains isolated from calves wit h diarrhoea were all associated with 0-group 9 and produced STa toxin when tested by suckling mousse bioassay. The E. coli K99 calf isolates were all hybridized with K99 and STa gene only . It is likely that K99 gene is associated with STa gene . The DNA hybridization technique is more convenience to be used for confirmation diagnosis of colibacillosis, however, not all veterinary laboratories could perform these tests .   Keywords: Excherichia coli, probe, gene detection, virulence determinant

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