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Contact Name
Ahmadi Riyanto
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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 8 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 19, No 4 (2014): DECEMBER 2014" : 8 Documents clear
Productivity of duckweed (Lemna minor) as alternative forage feed for livestock in different light intensities Nopriani, Uti; Karti, PDMH; Prihantoro, Iwan
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 19, No 4 (2014): DECEMBER 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (567.212 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v19i4.1095

Abstract

Duckweed (Lemna minor) is a small aquatic plant that grow and float in water and spread extensively. Lemna minor is potential as a source of high quality forage. This study aimed to determine optimal light intensity on Lemna minor to generate maximum productivity. Parameters observed were physical-biological and chemical characteristics of the media (pH value, temperature, cover area, decreased of media volume, BOD, COD, nitrate, nitrite and phosphate), plant growth acceleration (number of shoots, leaf diameter and chlorophyll-a), biomass production, doubling time of cover area and the number of daughters. This study was done based on a completely randomized design with 4 levels of shading. While treatment was: without shading, shading 30%, shading 50% and shading 70% using paranet shade. Each treatment consisted of 4 replications. Result showed that the productivity of Lemna minor included the number of daughters, chlorophyll-a, biomass production, cover area, absorbed phosphate and doubling time the number of daughters reached the highest level without shading treatment (1007,21-2813,57 lux). The decrease of intensity of light, the increase the diameter of leaf. Decrease of media volume was positively correlated to size of cover area. Biomass production influenced by a wide doubling time of cover area and number of daughters.
Seroprevalence of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5 subtype clade 2.3.2 on ducks and muscouvy ducks in small holders farm Martindah, Eny; Indriani, Risa; Wahyuwardani, S
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 19, No 4 (2014): DECEMBER 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (296.717 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v19i4.1097

Abstract

Seroprevalence studies of HPAI H5 subtype in ducks and muscouvy duck in smallholders farm was carried out in Serang and Tangerang District, Banten Province. The study comprised a serological survey to define the distribution and prevalence of HPAI H5 subtype infection on ducks and muscouvy ducks as well as attempted isolation of the virus from these species. Unit of sample in each stage was randomly choosen by multy stage random sample. Blood samples were taken from ducks and muscouvy ducks that had never been vaccinated, purposively. Sera were tested using Haemaglutination Inhibition Test, antigen H5N1 (clade 2.3.2), while the cloaca and trachea swab samples was injected into specific pathogens free (SPF) embryonated 9-11 days old, to isolate the virus. Results showed that H5 subtype virus could be isolated from tracheal swabs of ducks in the various age groups. The seroprevalence of H5 subtype virus in Banten Province was 25.5%, in which, 24.3% occured in ducks and in muscouvy duck in the rate of 1.2%, with titer HI positive was > 3log2. Based on species, seroprevalence level HPAI H5 subtype in ducks was 3-4 times higher than the level of seroprevalence of HPAI H5 subtype in muscouvy duck, which indicated that the H5 subtype virus more likely to circulate in the ducks flock than in muscouvy duck. This study noted that both muscouvy duck and ducks appeared to play a significant role in the epidemiology of the disease.
Detection of dioxins Trichloro dibenzo-p-dioxins and Trichloro dibenzofurans in beef with Gas Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry ., Indraningsih .; Sani, Yulvian
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 19, No 4 (2014): DECEMBER 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (447.383 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v19i4.1098

Abstract

This study is to investigate the residue level of TCDDs/TCDFs in beef collected from Animal Slaughter Houses in Giwangan (Yogyakarta), Klaten (Central Java) and Kupang (East Nusatenggara). Residue of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) was also analysed with GC-ECD, and dioxins with GC-MSMS. Fifty samples were collected form Giwangan (20), Klaten (15) and Kupang (15). Results shows that POPs were detected in beef samples including aldrin, dieldrin, DDT, endrin and heptachlor. The highest total residues of POPs were detected in beef from Giwangan (Yogyakarta) at 93.11 hg/g, followed by Klaten (17.79 hg/g) and Kupang (12.87 hg/g). Residues of POPs were below the maximum residue limit stated by the SNI 7313: 2008. Average of total TEQ for TCDDs/TCDFs in beef from Giwangan was 13,624.38 rg/g with a range between 4,496.66 to 20,642.40 rg/g was higher than that from Kupang at 1,623.98 rg/g with a range between 0.83 to 6,471.07 rg/g. On the other hand, dioxins were not detected in beef from Klaten. The total TEQ of TCDDs/TCDFs in beef samples from Giwangan was 54,497.52 rg/g and Kupang was 6,495.9 rg/g. These results indicated that there was an association between the presence of endrin and heptachlor with the presence of TCDDs/TCDFs residues in beef that this is may be new information for further studied.
Supplementation of calcium-fatty acid to lactating cow to increase milk production and performance of dairy cow Wina, Elizabeth; Widiawaty, Yeni; Tangendjaja, Budi; Susana, IWR
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 19, No 4 (2014): DECEMBER 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (256.74 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v19i4.1096

Abstract

One of energy sources for feeding  dairy cow is fat or oil, however, inclusion of fat or fatty acid at high level (>5% in the diet) may cause negative effect on rumen fermentation. Fat or fatty acid, therefore should be protected from its degradation in the rumen. The aim of this experiment was to evaluate protected product of palm oil fatty acid (Calcium fatty acid) made in the institute as feed supplement given on top of the ration. The first experiment was in vitro experiment using rumen liquor. Feed without and with Calcium fatty acid (Ca-FA) was incubated in buffer-rumen liquor and pH, total gas, ammonia and in vitro digetibility were measured. The second experiment was feeding trial with two treatments using 12 FH dairy cow divided into 2 groups with diet containing supplemntation 300 g of Ca-FA and other group is control treatment without supplementation. The feed was total mixed ration, comprises of elephant grass, ground corn, soybean meal, wheat pollard and coconut meal with protein content 15.1% and Net Energy for Lactation 1.53 Mcal/kg.. Feed was given to cow one month before parturition until 120 days of lactation period. Milk production was recorded daily. Faeces collection was done at the end of the experiments for 1 week to calculate total tract digestibility. The result of the in vitro experiment showed that no negative effect on in vitro rumen fermentation except higher digestibility (DMD Ca-FA addition vs control were 58.52% vs 53.99%) occurred due to addition of Ca-FA. The addition of Ca-FA increased milk production (11.41 vs 10.74 litre/day), but no effect on intake, total tract digestibility and milk quality, higher body weight of cow than control cow showing the benefit of using Ca-FA in the diet of dairy cow. In conclusion supplementation of Ca-FA at 300 g would be beneficial to increase milk production without negative impact.
Behaviour characteristics estimation tool of genetic distance between sheep breeds Handiwirawan, Eko; Noor, Ronny Rachman; Sumantri, Cece; ., Subandriyo .
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 19, No 4 (2014): DECEMBER 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1210.684 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v19i4.1092

Abstract

Information on the estimation of genetic distances and differentiation among sheep breeds are needed in crossing and conservation programs. This research aims to study of utilizing behaviour characteristic variables to differentiate and estimate genetic distance between the sheep breeds.  The study was conducted at Cilebut and Bogor Animal House of Indonesian Research Institute for Animal Production.  Five sheep breeds used were Barbados Black Belly Cross (BC), Garut Composite (KG), Garut Local (LG), Sumatera Composite (KS) and St. Croix Cross (SC), with total sample of 50 heads.  A total of 10 variables of behavior traits were observed in this study. Analysis of variances and significance tests were applied to compare between sheep breeds and performed for all of behavior traits using PROC GLM of SAS Program ver. 9.0. PROC CANDISC was used for canonical discriminant analyses, the hierarchical clustering was performed using the PROC CLUSTER by Average Linkage method (Unweighted Pair-Group Method Using Arithmetic Averages, UPGMA), and the dendogram for the five sheep breeds was described using PROC TREE.  The differentiator variables for the behavior traits were standing and feeding duration.  The canonical plotting based on behavioral characteristics could differentiate BC, KS and LG (with KG and SC) sheeps. Estimation of genetic distance based on the behavior traits is less accurate for grouping of sheep breeds.
Response to selection of growth traits in Aceh cattle Putra, Widya Pintaka Bayu; ., Sumadi .; Tety, H .; Hendra, S. .
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 19, No 4 (2014): DECEMBER 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (279.35 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v19i4.1093

Abstract

This research aimed to find out the genetic progress for Aceh cattle by several growth traits selection such as birth weight (BW), weaning weight (WW), yearling weight (YW), mature weight (MW) of does to identify the best selection response from bulls and cows breeding patterns. The recorded data of production and reproduction of Aceh cattle from 2010 to 2014 at breeding centre were analyzed and used as a technical coefficient on estimate heritability (h2), genetic correlation (rG), direct selection response (RY) and correlated selection response (CRY) on several breeding patterns. Most of  h2 and rG value among growth traits were positive and high. The highest value of Ry found on BW (0.04), WW (1.21), YW (2.05), MW (3.28) and this was obtained on breeding pattern for 3 years and cow for 6 years. The indirect selection or CRY value based on BW were lower than WW. It is concluded that WW might be used as selection criterion in order to increase WW, YW and MW.
Production performance of quails given chromium organic in ration Sudrajat, Deden; Kardaya, Dede; Dihansih, E; Puteri, SFS
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 19, No 4 (2014): DECEMBER 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (197.688 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v19i4.1094

Abstract

Egg production of quails depends on quality of ration. Nutrient manipulation by chromiun inclusion in ration is a possible way to improve production.  It is known that chromium mineral in form of GTF in blood has a role not only in enhancement of glucose entering cells through improvement of insulin activity but also in metabolism of lipid and synthesis of protein and elimination of heat stress to improve egg production. This study aimed at assessing egg production of quails fed ration containing chromium-yeast.  Sixty-four quails aged 40 days were used. A completely randomized design with 4 treatments and 4 replication was applied in this study. Treatment consisted of commercial ration + Cr 0 ppm (R1), commercial ration + Cr 0.5 ppm (R2), commercial ration + Cr 1 ppm (R3), and commercial ration+ Cr 1.5 ppm (R4). Measurements were taken on feed intake, egg weight, egg mass production, hen day, feed conversion rate, egg index, and egg shell thickness.  Results showed that A ration containing organic chromium as much as 1,5 ppm did not affect feed intake, egg production, egg weight, and eggshell thickness, however lowered feed conversion rate by up to 32.25% from that of control. Supplementation of  0,5 ppm chromium in the ration lowered the value of eggs index in the fourth week.
Effect of Sapindus rarak powder as feed additive on performance and lipid profile of broiler chicken infected by Eimeria tenella Pasaribu, Tiurma; Wina, Elizabeth; ., Sumiati; Setiyono, A; Astuti, Dewi Apri
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 19, No 4 (2014): DECEMBER 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (132.383 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v19i4.1099

Abstract

Sapindus rarak fruits have bioactive compound named saponin which are potential to inhibit growth of protozoa and reduce cholesterol. This study was conducted to evaluate effect of lerak (Sapindus rarak) powder as microparticle on performance and lipid profile of chicken broiler that was infected by Eimeria tenella. A total of150headsof DOCwere assign to recive on of5 treatments: T1 (K+, TAk, TSRa, TIE), T2 (K-, TAk, TSRa, IE), T3 (Sal, IE), T4 (Sra 2,5, IE), and T5 (Sra 1,25, IE); each treatment consisted of 6replications with 5birds per replications in battery cage for 34 days. All chickens except those in control positive treatment (non-infected, non-medicated) were inoculated orally with 6000 oocysts E. tenella on the 14th day of age. Variables measured were body weight gain, carcass, OPG (oocysts pergram of faeces), lipid profile, and mortality. Treatment with S. rarak, dose of 1.25g/kg was not significantly different from the salinomycin treatment on BWG and feed conversion. Percentage of carcassand organs and blood cholesterol concentration were not significantly differentin all treatments, but blood triglyceride at S. rarak addition with doseof 2.5, 1.25g/kg and salinomycin addition with dose of 0.5g/kg, and negative control were lower than positive control. While number of OPG in faeces (days 14-34) showed that S. rarak powder with dose of 2.5 and 1.25g/kg suppressed the development of oocystsof E. tenella. In conclusion, S. rarak microparticle (75µm) can be used as feed additive to replace salinomycinas coccidiostat.

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