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Contact Name
Ahmadi Riyanto
Contact Email
medpub@litbang.deptan.go.id
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ahmadi_puslitbangnak@yahoo.com
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Jawa barat
INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 7 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 19, No 3 (2014): SEPTEMBER 2014" : 7 Documents clear
Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase1 gene polymorphism and its association with milk fatty acid components in Holstein Friesian dairy cattle Asmarasari, Santi Ananda; Sumantri, Cece; Mathius, I Wayan; Anggraeni, Anneke
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 19, No 3 (2014): SEPTEMBER 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (349.124 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v19i3.1078

Abstract

Diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) gene is one of the major genes that has an important role in milk fat synthesis. This research was aimed at to identifying genetic polymorphism of the DGAT1 gene by PCR-RFLP method and its association to milk fatty acid components.  Animals studied were Holstein Friesian (HF) cattle from BBPTU Baturraden (123 cows) and BPPT SP Cikole (36 cows). The length of PCR product of the DGAT1gene was 411 bp. Genotyping resulted in two types of alleles, namely K (411 bp) and A (203 and 208 bp); and two genotypes, namely KK (411 bp) and AK (203, 208 and 411 bp). For both locations, genotype frequency of AK (0.75) was higher than KK (0.25). The allele frequency of K (0.64) was higher than A (0.36). Heterozygosity of HF cattles at both locations was relatively high (Ho>He). The DGAT1 gene of the observed HF cattle was polymorphic. Result showed that there was an association between the DGAT1 polymorphism with unsaturated fatty acids especially in nervonat acid. The AK cows had a significant effect on unsaturated fatty acid content of which having a higher nervonat content (0.05%) (P<0.05) than that of the KK cows (0.03%). From the results, it is concluded that the DGAT1 gene can be functioned as a marker of selection for milk fatty acids.
Production and purification of streptavidin with higher biotin-binding activity Tarigan, Simson; ., Sumarningsih .
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 19, No 3 (2014): SEPTEMBER 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (347.218 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v19i3.1086

Abstract

The objective of this study was to develop practical, efficient method for production, purification and assay of  binding activity of streptavidin. Streptomyces avidinii was first propagated on agar plates, the bacterial cells on the agar were scrapped and suspended in a defined synthetic media (4.4 ml/cm2). After 7 days agitation on a rotary shaker (200 rpm/min) at room temprature (≈28°C), the bacterial cells in the culture were pelleted. The culture supernatant was concentrated to 1/62 original volume with 75% saturation ammonium sulphate. After intensive dialysis against ammonium carbonate buffer pH 11, the suspension was loaded into an iminobiotin agarose column chromatography. The adsorbed protein (streptavidin) was eluted with sodium acetate buffer, pH 4, and the eluate was concentrated with an ultrafiltration divice and suspended in PBS. The strepatavidin-binding activity was  assayed by a competitive ELISA, a competition between streptavidin in the sample and the HRP-streptavidin conjugate for the biotin (biotinyl IgG) immobilised on wells of a microtitre plate. The detection limit of this assay measured 0.16 µg/ml streptavidin. The method developed in this study produced 160 µg/ml streptavidin in the culture supernatant. After concentration with the ammonium sulphate, the streptavidin concentration increased to 4 mg/ml (69% recovery). At the final step of purification, streptavidin with 10 mg/ml concentration was obtained. The purity of the streptavidin was higher (95%) with a recovary of 19%. The purified streptavidin in this study appeared as a dimer core streotavidin on SDS PAGE and its binding activity was twice as high as that of a commercial one.
Growth responses of native chicken Sentul G-3 on diet containing high rice-bran supplemented with phytase enzyme and ZnO Hidayat, Cecep; ., Sumiati .; Iskandar, Sofjan
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 19, No 3 (2014): SEPTEMBER 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (159.052 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v19i3.1082

Abstract

This study was conducted to determine the effect of phytase enzymes and ZnO supplementation on the performance of native chicken Sentul-G3 fed high rice-bran diet. Two hundred and seventy day old chicks (DOC) native chicken Sentul-G3 from three different hatcheries were used in this study. Factorial randomized block design (3 x 3) was applied in this study. The first factor was the enzyme phytase supplementation levels (0; 1000; 2000 U/kg), the second factor was the level of supplementation of ZnO (0; 1.5; 3.2 g/kg), so that there are nine treatment given, namely R1 = 50% commercial diet : 50% rice bran; R2 = R1 + 1.5 g ZnO/kg; R3 = R1 + 3.2 g ZnO/kg; R4 = R1 + phytase enzyme 1000 U/kg; R5 = R1 + (phytase enzyme 1000 U/kg + 1.5 g ZnO/kg); R6 = R1 + (phytase enzyme 1000 U/kg + 3.2 g ZnO/kg); R7 = R1 + phytase enzyme 2000 U/kg; R8 = R1 + (phytase enzyme 2000 U/kg + 1.5 g ZnO/kg); R9 = R1 + (phytase enzyme 2000 U/kg + 3.2 g ZnO/kg). Each experimental unit consisted of 6 head unsexed native chicken Sentul-G3. The experimental diet was fed for 10 weeks. The variables measured were body weight, body weight gain, feed intake, feed conversion ratio, mortality, mineral deposition of Ca, P, Zn in the tibia bone, alkaline phosfatase enzyme activity in serum. Results showed that there was significant interaction (P<0.05) between phytase enzyme and ZnO supplementation on body weight, body weight gain, feed conversion, zinc deposition in the tibia bone. There was no significant interaction (P> 0.05) between phytase enzyme and ZnO supplementation on feed intake, mortality, alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity in serum, and deposition of calcium and  phosphorus in the tibia bone. It was concluded that supplementation of phytase enzyme and ZnO were not able to increase the growth of native chicken Sentul-G3 on fed diet containing high rice bran.
The effect of feeding pre-starter on performance efficiency of local chicken (KUB chicken) Iskandar, Sofjan; Hidayat, Cecep; Cahyaningsih, T.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 19, No 3 (2014): SEPTEMBER 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (167.546 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v19i3.1083

Abstract

An experiment in feeding pre-starter diets was carried out on local chicken (KUB chicken) raised to the age of 84 days. Four hundred and eighty day-old KUB chicks were allocated to experimental diets of P1 = standard diet without pre-starter; P2 = OASIS® pre-starter for 48 hours feeding; P3 = COBA-1, a mixture of 76.3% yolk powder, 0.76% inulin powder, 7.63 % honey and 15.3% tomato sauce, for 24 hours feeding; P4 = P3 given for 48 hours feeding; P5 = fresh papaya for 24 hours feeding; P6 = P5 for 48 hours feeding; P7 = fasting for 24 hours and P8 = fasting for 48 hours. Following treatment, the chicks were then fed with standard diet, containing 17.5 % crude protein with 2800 kcal ME/kg up to the end of the experiment. Results showed that the group of chicken on pre-starter diet of ripe papaya fruit (P5 and P6), responded better EPEF (European Performance Efficiency Factor) value of 442 and 356 g/bird, respectively in chicken of P5 and P6. This better response was due to particularly higher viability and the efficiency in utilization of feed.
Freezing capacity of sperm on various type of superior bulls Sukmawati, Eros; Arifiantini, R. I.; Purwantara, B.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 19, No 3 (2014): SEPTEMBER 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v19i3.1079

Abstract

Low quality of sperm after freezing and thawing process due to changes in extreme temperature and osmolarity. The sperm freezing capability and sperm membrane damage was to evaluate by measuring the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) of  Simmental, Limousin and Friesian Holstein (FH) bull of a total of 10 bulls aged 4-8 years. Data were analyzed with a linear model (GLM) and Duncan s test. Results showed that breed influence sperm motility and MDA levels but not in the membrane integrity (MI) and viability. The FH bull had a low of recovery rate (RR) 57.53± 1.74% with high MDA level (0.81± 0.31 nmol/108 sperm level) and Limousine had the highest RR (59.70 ± 3.23% ) with the low MDA (0.52±0.25 nmol/108 sperm). Freezing decreased the sperm motility, viability and MI of all bulls. Sperm motility, viability and MI decreased by 28.32±1,45% and 29.73±1.54%, 21.58±4.09% and 22.55± 5.60% and 21.25±6.86% and 23.51±6.05 % respectively.
Potential and utilization of Indigofera sp shoot leaf meal as soybean meal substitution in laying hen diets Palupi, Rizki; Abdullah, Luki; Astuti, Dewi Apri; ., Sumiati .
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 19, No 3 (2014): SEPTEMBER 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (244.018 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v19i3.1084

Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine the potential of Indigofera sp shoot leaf meal to substitute soybean meal in poultry diet. One hundred and sixty laying hens of Isa Brown strain, at 30 weeks old were used in this study and kept in individual cages. A Randomized Completely Design was applied with four treatments and four replications. The treatments were four levels of soybean meal protein substitution by Indigofera sp shoot meal protein in the diets: The level were 0% (R0), 15% (R1), 30% (R2) and 45% (R3). Eggs were collected daily and were evaluated on: weight, shell, albumen, yolk, intensity of yolk and haugh unit. Results showed that the nutrients content of Indigofera sp shoot leaf meal were crude protein 28.98%, crude fat 3.30%, crude fiber 8.49%, calcium 0.52% and phosphorus content was 0.34%. Indigofera sp shoot leaf meal contained a complete amino acids. The vitamin A and ß-carotene were high, i.e 3828.79 IU/100g and 507.6 mg/kg, respectively. It is concluded that Indigofera sp shoot leaf meal is potential to be used as an alternative source of protein. Substitute 45% soybean meal protein with Indigofera sp shoot leaf meal in laying hen diets increase egg quality and increase intensity of yolk colour to 55.88%.
Preferences, digestibility and rumen fermentation characteristics of several mulberry species in goats Ginting, Simon Petrus; Tarigan, Andi; Hutasoit, Rijanto; Yulistiani, Dwi
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 19, No 3 (2014): SEPTEMBER 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (345.519 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v19i3.1080

Abstract

This study was aimed to investigate the preferences and nutritional qualities of four mulberry species (Morus cathyana, Morus nigra, Morus indica and Morus multicaulis) in goat diet. Foliages were fed to six adult Boer x Kacang goats in a cafetaria style for preference analyses. Nutritional qualities (feed intake, apparent digestibility, N balances, rumen fermentation characteristics) and blood metabolites were measured in a digestion trial. Twenty male goats were used in a completely randomised arrangement of four treatments (mulberry species) and five replications. The selectivity indices were +0,389, -0,156, -0,154 and -0,234 for M. multicaulis, M. nigra, M. cathyana and M. indica, respectively, indicating that M. multicaulis was the most  and M. indica was the least preferred species. When fed as the sole foliage  the DM intake was higher (P<0.05) in  goats offered M. multicaulis (780 g/d) and M. nigra (718 g/d) compared to those fed M. cathyana (637 g/d) and M. indica  (598 g/d). The DM intake were equal to 38.6; 35.5; 31.5 dan 29.6 g/kg BW, respectively. The DM apparent digestibility were not different (P>0.05) among the species ranging from 60-65%. The N balances (N retained) was highest (P<0.05) in the M. multicaulis group (16,7 g/d) and was lowest in the M. indica (12,3 g/d) and M. cathyana groups (11,7 g/d). The rumen pH and  total VFA concentration was not diferent (P>0,05) among treatments. The ammonia concentration was higest (P>0,05) in the M. multicaulis and was lowest in the M. indica and M. cathyana groups. The bacteria and protozoa population was not different (P>0,05) among the treatments. It is concluded that M. multicaulis was more preferred by goats compared to  M. nigra, M. indica and M. cathyana, but all species have potential as foliages for goats as shown by its high intake, digestibility and rumen fermentation rates.

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