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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
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Articles 16 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 18, No 4 (2013)" : 16 Documents clear
Milk production of rabbit doe and kit mortality as affected by dietary katuk leaf meal (Sauropus androgynus L. Merr) Akbar, Mubarak; o, Sjofjan; s, Minarti
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 18, No 4 (2013)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (151.771 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v18i4.326

Abstract

This study was aimed as to determining the effect of katuk (Sauropus androgynus L. Merr) leaf on influence rabbit doe milk production and kits mortality during 3 weeks weeks of age. Twenty four does aged 6-12 months, divided into three blocks, of four treatment diets, were used in our replicity. The diet treatments used katuk leaf meal: 0% (P0), 1% (P1), 2% (P2), and 3% (P3). The parameters observed were: doe’s milk production, kits mortality, kit as level: body weight gain, and immune response. The results showed that supplementation of katuk leaf meal increased (P < 0,05) doe milk production and body weight gain of kits during 3 weeks experiment, whereas mortality and immune responses were not affected by katuk leaf meal supplementation. Key Words: Katuk Leaf Meal, Rabbit Does Milk Production, Kit Mortality
Effect of glycerol and dimethylformamide cryoprotectants on buck Etawah Crossbreed frozen semen using modified tris diluents. OS, Ariantie; TL, Yusuf; D, Sajuthi; RI, Arifiantini
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 18, No 4 (2013)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (225.833 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v18i4.327

Abstract

A cryoprotectan is component that must be present in a cryopreservation medium to minimize the physical and chemical stresses resulting from the cooling, freezing and thawing of sperm cells. This study was carried out to determine the effect of glycerol (G) and dimethylformamide (DMF) as cryprotective agent in tris-egg yolk (TEY) trehalose (T) and tris-soya (TS) raffinose (R) diluents. Semen were collected from three sexually mature bucks using artificial vagina, evaluated and divided into four aliquot. Each of them was diluted with TEY suplemented with 50 mM trehalose and TS supplemented with 50 mM raffinose, added with glycerol or DMF 4% (v/v). Diluted semen was packed in minitube straw (100 x 106 sperm/0.25 mL) and equilibrated for 4 hours at 5°C, then freeze in N2 vapor for 10 minutes in styrofoam box and stored in liquid N2 container (-196) until futher evaluation. Progressive motility, viability and plasma membrane intact were evaluated after thawed at 37°C for 30 seconds factorial experimental design (2 x 2) was used in this study. The sperm motility in TEYTG was significantly higher (65.07±5.38%) compared to TEYTDMF (61.67±5.55%). In contrast sperm diluted with TSRDMF indicated better motility (42.22±8.13%) than TSRG (39.07±5.38%). It was concluded that cryoprotectant had different effect on different diluents. Key Words: Buck Etawah Crossbreed, Cryoprotectant, Diluent, Frozen Semen
Production performance and immune responses of broilers given single step down diet with inclution of citric acid as acidifier ., Jamilah; N, Suthama; LD, Mahfudz
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 18, No 4 (2013)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (155.945 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v18i4.331

Abstract

A research was conducted to examine the effect of lime and citric acid as acidifier with single step down feeding systems on immune response and production performance of broilers. Treatments applied were P0 (normal diet), P1 (single step down diet), P2 (single step down diet + citric acid 0.8%), P3 (single step down diet + lime acid 0.4% (6.9 ml/100g feed)) P4, (single step down diet + lime acid 0.8% (13.8 ml/100g feed)) and P5 (single step down diet + lime acid 1.2% (20.7 ml/100g feed)). The parameters measured in this research were immune responses (percentage of bursa fabricius, spleen and heterophile lymphocyte ratio/H-L ratio) and production performances (muscle protein mass, feed intake and body weight). Research was assigned in a completely randomized design with 6 treatments and 4 replications (8 birds each). Treatment was given one week until 6 week. The data were subjected to analysis of variance and continued to Duncan test at the level of 5% probability. The results showed that percentage of bursa fabricius were significantly (P < 0.05) different. Treatment P2 (0.13) showed the highest value and significantly different to that of compared to the others P1 (0.08), but the other treatments were the same. Percentages of spleen from treatments P0 and P1 were statistically different as compared to the others. HL ratio was the same among treatments P0, P1 and P3, but it was significantly different from those of treatments P2, P4 and P5. Based on the results of the present study it was concluded that inclusion of citric acid both natural and synthetic forms can improve immune responses and increase muscle protein mass especially due to the inclusion of synthetic citric acid. Key Words: Broiler, Step Down Diet, Acidifier, Immune Response, Production Performance
The growth of tree legume fodder Indigofera zollingeriana at various levels of drought stress treatment Herdiawan, Iwan
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 18, No 4 (2013)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (175.845 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v18i4.332

Abstract

The research aimed to determine growth of the forage tree legume Indigofera zollingeriana on different drought stress treatments. The study was done based on completely randomized design (CRD), with 12 plants as replications. The treatment consisted of three levels of drought stress, ie control (100% field capacity=fc), moderate drought stress (50% fc), and severe drought stress (25% fc). The variables observed were plant height, stem diameter, number of branches, biomass production, shoot dry weight, root dry weight, shoot/root ratio, and root length. The data were analyzed by covariance analyzed (ANOVA) and the differences between the treatments were tested by LSD. The results showed that moderat drought stress (50% fc) and severe drought stress (25% fc) significantly (P < 0.01) decreased length and height of plant, stem diameter, number of branches, biomass production, shoot dry weight, root dry weight, but not shoot or root ratio. Key words: Indigofera zollingeriana, Drought Stress, Growth
Evaluation of mating behaviour and mating compatibility methods for the Old World screwworm fly, Chrysomya bezziana. Wardhana, April H.; MM, Cameron; S, Muharsini; MJR, Hall
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 18, No 4 (2013)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (237.362 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v18i4.333

Abstract

The effectiveness of the Sterile Insect Technique program (SIT) to eradicate pest insects relies on the success of mating competitiveness between irradiated male flies and wild type males for the wild type females. It has been successfully applied for the New World screwworm fly (NWSF), Cochliomyia hominivorax but remains unproven for the Old World screwworm fly (OWSF), Chrysomya bezziana. The aim of the study was to develop methods for investigating mating behaviour and mating compatibility of C. bezziana under laboratory conditions. Two methods were used for studying mating: individual mating (method 1) and group mating (method 2). The flies used in this study were 5-7 days old. Twenty four hours after emergence, adult flies were sexed and placed into different cages until studied. The female : male ratio in the group mating was 1 : 5 and the males were marked by painting a dot on the thorax using different oil colours. Observation of mating behaviour was investigated every 30 minutes through 10-20 replications for all methods depending on the availability of flies. Data were analysed using ANOVA and the Student’s t-test, with significance demonstrated at the 95% confidence level. The results demonstrated that the frequency of contacts between males and females at different ages was a significantly different (p < 0.05) and that the duration of copulation was not significantly affected by fly age both method 1 (p > 0.05) and method 2 (p > 0.05). Copulation was only initiated following longer periods of contact, mainly in the range of 270-449 seconds. The highest frequency of copulation occurred between 7-8 days, but the duration of mating was similar between 5-8 days old. The study demonstrated that the methods developed were suitable for a mating compatibility study of C. bezziana. Key Words: Chrysomya bezziana, Mating Behaviour, Copulation, Myiasis
Parasitaemia pattern and mortality of mice infected by Indonesian Isolate of Trypanosoma evansi. Subekti, Didik T.; DH, Sawitri; AH, Wardhana; ., Suhardono
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 18, No 4 (2013)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (2410.495 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v18i4.334

Abstract

Trypanosomiasis (Surra) is one of the parasitic diseases is endemic and deadly for horses and buffalo in Indonesia.The etiology of the disease is a Trypanosoma evansi. Some T. evansi isolates had been isolated and cryopreservated. Those isolates had not been studied for their differences in virulence, particularly with regard to the pattern of parasiteaemia and their ability to promote mice mortality. Therefore in this study the differences in virulence was studied. DDY mice were divided in to 19 groups according to each isolate to be tested. Each group consisted of 5 mice. Infection were carried intraperitoneally at a dose of 104 Trypanosoma/mice. Mice were examined every two days. Blood samples were taken from tail’s peripheral blood and were examined under light microscope. Parasite were quantitatively counted using Naubauer chamber.  Parasitemia and mice survival were observed for 30 days or until all mice died.The results indicated that there was significant difference among the isolates.Through out the nineteenth isolate scan could be grouped into 3 different biotypes associated with patterns of parasitemia and their ability to kill mice. Biotype1 was the most virulent with the ability to promote mice mortality ≤ 8 days post-infection (dpi). The biotype2 and 3 were the lowest compared to biotype 1. Biotype2 had an undulating parasitaemia, where as biotype 3 showed persistently high parasitaemia with the ability to promote mice mortality ≥ 14dpi. The results also indicate the presence of mixed infections of biotypes that exist in one isolate of T. evansi. Key Words: Trypanosoma evansi, Biotype, Virulence, Mixed infection, Parasitaemia
The effects of dietary neutral detergent fiber ratio on the rumen degradability and growth performance of Philippine native goats (Capra hircus Linn.) D, Nugroho; CC, Sevilla; AA, Angeles; ., Sunarso
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 18, No 4 (2013)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (190.628 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v18i4.336

Abstract

This research’s objective was to determine the dietary rumen degradability and growth performances of goats fed dietary treatments. Eighteen (18) female goats were grouped into 6 weight classes for the feeding trial experiment, the average BW of the animals that were used was about 7.96 ± 2.21 kg (CV - 27.76%) and were approximately 1 year of age. For the in situ digestibility, three (3) male mature goats surgically fitted with cannulated rumen were used. Three (3) dietary treatments were used for all studies as follows: T1 - 72 : 28  NDF Forage-Concentrate Ratio; T2 - 64 : 36; T3 - 57 : 43. A RCBD was applied for Feeding Trial and a 3 x 3 LSD was used for In Situ Study. Treatments 1, 2 and 3 did not affect the rate of rumen degradability of DM, NDF and CP at 0 hours, potentially degradable fraction (b) and the rate of degradation of b. The treatments affected the intake rate of forage and concentrates on the DM, CP and NDF. However, the total intake of DM, CP and NDF were not affected by the treatments. Growth performance of goats used in this experiment was not affected by the treatments as indicated by the similar production and efficiency. This means that diets given to native goats with ratio of NDF forage of 72.07% can be applied since the value of the output and efficiency of feed utilization had the same value compared to diets ratio of NDF forage of 57.21%. Key Words: NDF Forage, Ration, Goat
Identification of Mardivirus Serotypes Circulating in Poultry Farms in Sukabumi and Cianjur District, West Java, 2011 using Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction (mPCR) Approach Hartawan, Risza; NLPI, DharmayantI
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 18, No 4 (2013)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v18i4.337

Abstract

Three serotypes of Mardivirus had been circulating in the farm environments, these being Marek’s disease virus serotype 1 (MDV-1), Gallid hepesvirus 3 (GaHV3) and herpesvirus of turkey (HVT). However, only MDV-1 poses a significant hazard to the poultry farm. The virus causes a neoplastic syndrome that inflicting severe economic loss to the affected farms. Although vaccination has successfully reduced the frequency and severity of outbreaks, the threat does not disappear since several more pathogenic strains have evolved, and these can overcome protection by vaccination. The aim of this study was to investigate the circulation of three Mardivirus serotypes in commercial poultry farms in Sukabumi and Cianjur district using mPCR approach for the feather samples. A low prevalence of these three serotypes was detected. However, the practice of vaccinating using live attenuated MDV-1 caused difficulty in the investigation. Differentation between virulent field strains and CVI988 vaccine strain using the 132 bp repeat motif attenuation marker within the terminal and inverted repeats flanking the unique long region generated an ambiguous result. Thus, other approaches are required to address this issue, such as selection of other markers, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), high-resolution melt curve analysis (HRM) and gene sequencing. Key Words: Mardivirus serotype, MDV-1, GaHV3, HVT, multiplex PCR
Milk production of rabbit doe and kit mortality as affected by dietary katuk leaf meal (Sauropus androgynus L. Merr) Akbar, Mubarak; o, Sjofjan; s, Minarti
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 18, No 4 (2013): DECEMBER 2013
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (151.771 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v18i4.326

Abstract

This study was aimed as to determining the effect of katuk (Sauropus androgynus L. Merr) leaf on influence rabbit doe milk production and kits mortality during 3 weeks weeks of age. Twenty four does aged 6-12 months, divided into three blocks, of four treatment diets, were used in our replicity. The diet treatments used katuk leaf meal: 0% (P0), 1% (P1), 2% (P2), and 3% (P3). The parameters observed were: doe’s milk production, kits mortality, kit as level: body weight gain, and immune response. The results showed that supplementation of katuk leaf meal increased (P < 0,05) doe milk production and body weight gain of kits during 3 weeks experiment, whereas mortality and immune responses were not affected by katuk leaf meal supplementation. Key Words: Katuk Leaf Meal, Rabbit Does Milk Production, Kit Mortality
Production performance and immune responses of broilers given single step down diet with inclution of citric acid as acidifier ., Jamilah; N, Suthama; LD, Mahfudz
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 18, No 4 (2013): DECEMBER 2013
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (155.945 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v18i4.331

Abstract

A research was conducted to examine the effect of lime and citric acid as acidifier with single step down feeding systems on immune response and production performance of broilers. Treatments applied were P0 (normal diet), P1 (single step down diet), P2 (single step down diet + citric acid 0.8%), P3 (single step down diet + lime acid 0.4% (6.9 ml/100g feed)) P4, (single step down diet + lime acid 0.8% (13.8 ml/100g feed)) and P5 (single step down diet + lime acid 1.2% (20.7 ml/100g feed)). The parameters measured in this research were immune responses (percentage of bursa fabricius, spleen and heterophile lymphocyte ratio/H-L ratio) and production performances (muscle protein mass, feed intake and body weight). Research was assigned in a completely randomized design with 6 treatments and 4 replications (8 birds each). Treatment was given one week until 6 week. The data were subjected to analysis of variance and continued to Duncan test at the level of 5% probability. The results showed that percentage of bursa fabricius were significantly (P < 0.05) different. Treatment P2 (0.13) showed the highest value and significantly different to that of compared to the others P1 (0.08), but the other treatments were the same. Percentages of spleen from treatments P0 and P1 were statistically different as compared to the others. HL ratio was the same among treatments P0, P1 and P3, but it was significantly different from those of treatments P2, P4 and P5. Based on the results of the present study it was concluded that inclusion of citric acid both natural and synthetic forms can improve immune responses and increase muscle protein mass especially due to the inclusion of synthetic citric acid. Key Words: Broiler, Step Down Diet, Acidifier, Immune Response, Production Performance

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