cover
Contact Name
Ahmadi Riyanto
Contact Email
medpub@litbang.deptan.go.id
Phone
-
Journal Mail Official
ahmadi_puslitbangnak@yahoo.com
Editorial Address
-
Location
Kota bogor,
Jawa barat
INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 9 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 18, No 2 (2013): JUNE 2013" : 9 Documents clear
Isolation and identification of lactid acid bacteria originated from king grass (Pennisetum purpureophoides) as candidate of probiotic for livestock B, Santoso; A, Maunatin; BT, Hariadi; H, Abubakar
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 18, No 2 (2013): JUNE 2013
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (218.053 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v18i2.312

Abstract

A study was conducted to isolate and identify strain of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from king grass, and to determine their potential as candidate of probiotic for livestock. The LAB was isolated by culturing king grass extract in De Man, Rogosa and Sharpe (MRS) medium. The pure culture LAB was used to identify strain of bacteria using Analytical Profile Index (API) 50 CH kit. The result showed that the strain bacteria was identified as Lactobacillus plantarum. L. plantarum was able to survive in extreme condition at pH 2 and 0.3% bile salt. L. plantarum also survived against pathogenic bacteria i.e. Staphylococcus aureus, Escherechia coli and Salmonella thypi. It is concluded that L. plantarum isolated from king grass could potentially to be used as probiotic for livestock. Key Words: Bile salt, Lactic acid bacteria, Pathogen, Probiotic, pH.
Effectivity of water soluble granule from kenikir leaves extract (Cosmos caudatus), noni leaves extract (Morinda citrifolia), and earthworm meal extract (Lumbricus rubellus) as a natural coccidiostat for broiler chickens against infection caused by Eimeri MF, Karimy; H, Julendr; SN, Hayati; a, Sofyan; E, Damayanti; D, Priyowidodo
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 18, No 2 (2013): JUNE 2013
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1808.373 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v18i2.308

Abstract

The aim of this research was to study effectivity of water soluble granule from kenikir leaves extract (Cosmos caudatus), noni leaves extract (Morinda citrifolia), and earthworm meal extract (Lumbricus rubellus) as a natural coccidiostat for broiler chickens against infection caused by Eimeria tenella. One hundred day old chick (DOC) of the Cobb strain broiler were randomly devided into 10 groups and each group consisted of 10 chickens. All groups were orally infected by 5000 sporulated oocyst of E. tenella on the 25th days old as a challenge infection. The chickens was treated by granule of kenikir leaves extract, noni leaves extract and granule of earthworm meal extract which level dosage was 100, 200 and 300 mg/kgbw, respectively on each treatment (K1, K2, K3; M1, M2, M3 and T1, T2, T3). Control (K0) did not treated by feed additive. Treatment was administered on drinking water. On the 5th days after challenge infection 5 chickens of each groups were slaughtered and necropted to evaluate lession score and histopatology of caeca. Oocyst per gram excreta was count on 7th days until 10th days after challenge infection of the others 5 chickens of each groups. The results showed that the lowest score of lession was obtained on M2 and M3 whereas the lowest total oocyst per gram excreta was obtained on M3. Histopathological observation revealed that there was no stadia development of E. tenella in M2 treatment. It was concluded that granule of noni leaves extract at 200 mg/kgbw (M2) was the most effective natural coccidiostat. Key Words: Eimeria tenella, Kenikir Leaves, Noni Leaves, Earthworm Meal, Broiler Chickens
Synthesis of an oxytetracyline-tolidin-BSA immunogen and antibodies production of anti-oxytetracyline developed for oxytetracyline residue detection with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays technique R, Widiastuti; TB, Murdiati; D, Riandari
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 18, No 2 (2013): JUNE 2013
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (632.18 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v18i2.313

Abstract

An oxytetracycline-tolidin-bovine serum albumin (OTC-tolidin-BSA)-conjugate was synthezed as immunogen for producing specific antibodies in immunized rabbits that would be used as reagent for development of OTC residue detection with enzym-linked immunoassays technique. The immunogen was prepared through diazotization tolidin and subsequently reacted with OTC. The red purple immunogen of OTC-tolidin-BSA absorbed at wave lengths of 277 nm and 488 nm under UV screening absorbances and confirmation with the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) showed the absence of peak at retention time of 3.46 minutes. Characaterized result with SDS-PAGE showed the molecular weight of the OTC-tolidin-BSA at 69.79 kDA. Subsequently, the immunogen was immunized into New Zealand rabbits in order to produce the polyclonal antibodies. The antibodies were purified using a protein A sepharose column. The OD optimum responses of 0.92 to 1.20 were obtained from the second fractionation at dilution of 1/1000 by titrating the antibodies and OTC-tolidin-BSA coating antigen at concentration of 10 µg/mL on several bleeding times. Key Words: Oxytetracycline, OTC-Tolidin-BSA, Immunogen, Immunization, Antibodies
Molecular characteristic and pathogenicity of Indonesian H5N1 clade 2.3.2 viruses NLPI, Dharmayanti; R, Hartawan; DA, Hewajuli; ., Hardiman; H, Wibawa; ., Pudjiatmoko
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 18, No 2 (2013): JUNE 2013
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (385.603 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v18i2.309

Abstract

The outbreak of disease in late 2012 in Indonesia caused high duck mortality. The agent of the disease was identified as H5N1 clade 2.3.2. The disease caused economic loss to the Indonesian duck farmer. The clade 2.3.2 of H5N1 virus has not previously been identified, so this study was conducted to characterize 4 of H5N1 clade 2.3.2 viruses by DNA sequencing in eight genes segment virus namely HA, NA, NS, M, PB1, PB2, PA and NP.  The pathogenicity test of clade 2.3.2 viruses in ducks was compared to clade 2.1.3 viruses which predominat circulating in Indonesia. Results of phylogenetic tree analysis showed that the four of clade 2.3.2 viruses isolated in 2012 was the new introduced virus from abroad. Further analysis showed eight genes were in one group with the clade 2.3.2 viruses, especially those from VietNam and did not belong to Indonesia viruses group. The pathogenicity test in ducks showed that virus H5N1 clade 2.3.2 and clade 2.1.3 have similar clinical symptoms and pathogenicity and cause death in 75% of ducks on days 3-6 after infection. Key Words: H5N1 Virus, Clade 2.3.2, Clade 2.1.3, Phylogenetic Tree, Pathogenecity
Response of oxidative stress and isoflavone treatment on superoxide dismutase enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation in rat’s liver IN, Suarsana; T, Wresdiyati; A, Suprayogi
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 18, No 2 (2013): JUNE 2013
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (270.367 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v18i2.314

Abstract

Oxidative stress is defined as over-production of free radicals which lead to cells damage, pathological condition and cell death. The objective of this study was to analyze respond of oxidative stress and isoflavone treatment on superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation in rat liver. A total of fifteen male Spraque Dawley rats were used in this study. They were sub-divided into three groups; (1) a negative control group, (2) a stress oxidative group, and (3) treatment by stress condition followed by treatment with isoflavone. Stress condition was achieved by five days fasting together with swimming for 5 mins/day and only drinking water ad libitum. Isoflavone was orally administrated on a dose of 1 mg/200g bw/day for five days. At the end of the experiment, rats were sacrificed by anesthesia. Liver was collected for analysis of SOD enzyme activities, SOD immunohistochemical analysis, and malondialdehyde (MDA) level. Result showed that stress condition increase free radicals that showed by decreased SOD activity, and increased MDA level. Isoflavone treatment could get over reduction of SOD and prevented increase of MDA level in the liver of rats under stress conditions. Key Words: Oxidative Stress, Isoflavone, Rat, Superoxide Dismutase, Malondialdehyde
Exploration and conservation of bacterial genetic resources as bacteriocin producing inhibitory microorganisms to pathogen bacteria in livestock S, Chotiah
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 18, No 2 (2013): JUNE 2013
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (894.038 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v18i2.310

Abstract

Exploration and conservation of microorganisms producing bacteriocin was done as the primary study towards the collection of potential bacteria and its application in improving livestock health condition and inhibit food borne pathogens. Diferent kinds of samples such as beef cattle rectal swab, rumen fluids, cow’s milk, chicken gut content, goat’s milk were collected at Bogor cattle slaughter houses, poultry slaughter houses, dairy cattle and goat farms. A total of 452 bacterial isolates consisted of 73 Gram negative bacteria and 379 Gram positive bacteria were isolated from samples collected and screened for bacteriocin activity. Determination of bacteriocin activity with bioassay using agar spot tests were carried out on liquid and semisolid medium assessing 8 kins of indicators of pathogenic bacteria and food borne pathogens. A total of 51 bacteriocin producing strains were collected and some of the strains had high inhibitory zone such as Lactobacillus casei SS14C (26 mm), Enterobacter cloacae SRUT (24mm), Enterococcus faecalis SK39 (21mm) and Bifidobacterium dentium SS14T (20mm) respectively, to Salmonella typhimurium BCC B0046/ATCC 13311, E. coli O157 hemolytic BCC B2717, Listeria monocytogenes BCC B2767/ATCC 7764 and Escherichia coli VTEC O157 BCC B2687. Evaluation after conservation ex situ to all bacterocin producing strain at 5oC for 1 year in freeze drying ampoules in vacuum and dry condition revealed the decreasing viability starting from log 0.8 CFU/ml for Lactococcus and Leuconostoc to log 2.2. CFU/ml for Streptococcus. Result of the study showed that the bacteriocin producing strains obtained were offered a potential resource for preventing disease of livestock and food borne diseases. Key Words: Bacterocin, Bacteria, Exploration, Conservation Ex Situ
Effect of fermented Banana peel on Broiler Carcass TNI, Koni
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 18, No 2 (2013): JUNE 2013
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (143.265 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v18i2.315

Abstract

This experiment was conducted to examine effect of inclusion of fermented banana peel by Rhyzopus oligosporus in diets on slaughter weight, carcass weight  and carcass percentage, weight and percentage abdominal fat of broiler. The experiment was done based on Completely Randomized Design with four treatments and four replications and each replication consisted of six chickens. The treatment were R0 = without banana peel fermented, R1 = 5% banana peel fermented, R2 = 10% banana peel fermented, R3 = 15% banana peel fermented. Data of the experiment were analyzed, using ANOVA and then continued with Duncans Multiple Range Test. Result showed that level of fermented banana peel affected slaughter weight and carcass weight. However carcass persentage, weight and percentage of abdominal fat was not affected by treatment. Banana peel fermented by Rhizopus oligosporus could can be used maximally 10% in broiler ration. Key Words: Banana Peel, Rhyzopus oligosporus, Slaughter Weight, Carcass Weight, Abdominal Fat
Puberty of Katingan cow in realation to Cu mineral and the environtment BN, Utomo; RR, Noor; C, Sumantri; I, Supriatna; ED, Gurnardi
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 18, No 2 (2013): JUNE 2013
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (196.151 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v18i2.311

Abstract

The onset of puberty is an important role in order to optimize performance of Katingan cattle reproduction. The onset of puberty can be estimated from to blood progesterone concentration. In this study the onset of puberty was estimetid through analysis of progesterone hormone in various age of individual cattle. Thirty blood samples were obtained from 30 Katingan heifers of 13 months and 15 days to 23 months and 18 days old from Tumbang Lahang (10 samples) and Buntut Bali (20 sampels) to be analyzed for progesterone concentrations using RIA method. The same samples were also analyzed to find out information about Copper (Cu) concentration. The results showed that progesterone concentration varied narrowly from 0.008 to 0.184 ng/ml. The result indicated that the Katingan cattle in 23 months old was still in prepuberty category. Environment factor such as land pH was acid (pH<6), grass quality and climate in term of temperature and humidity relatively high, may an important role to delay the oset of their puberty. One of the environment problem was proved by the most of the same samples than had under adequate value of level of Copper.   Key Words: Katingan Cattle, Progesterone, Puberty, Cu mineral, Environment
Forage and seed production of Puero (Pueraria javanica) in a Different Light intensity level A, Fanindi; E, Sutedi; BR, Prawiradiputra
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 18, No 2 (2013): JUNE 2013
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (173.983 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v18i2.307

Abstract

Puero (Pueraria javanica) is forage that can serve as a cover crop in plantations. The limiting factor for plant growth in the plantation is the light intensity, therefore the influence of light intensity on forage and seed production of Puero needs to be examined. Research was conducted at Kaum Pandak Research station of Indonesian Research Institute for Animal Production Bogor and Laboratory of Agrostology Faculty of Animal Husbandry, Bogor Agricultural University, for 16 months. Four levels of light intensity,i.e 100, 80,60 and 40% were applied, leguminosainous species Puero (Pueraria javanica), was used. The treatments were arangged in Randomized Complete Block Design with 3 replications. Data collected were analyzed by ANOVA and Duncan’s Multiple Range Test. Forage production was evaluated in one year. The forage quality and digestibility (invitro) were assessed. Seed production was recorded accumulatively from seasonal seed production during one year. Results show that light intensity affected (P < 0.05) forage and seed production, chlorophyll a and total chlorophyll of Puero, but did not affect (P > 0.05) quality and digestibility of Puero. The highest forage and seed production of Puero were obtained from full light intensity (100%). and seed production of Puero was affected (P < 0.05) by light intensity. The seed quality of Puero was also affected by light intensity. The best seed quality of Puero was achieved by from 80% light intensity. Key Words: Light Intensity, Forage Production, Seed, Puero

Page 1 of 1 | Total Record : 9


Filter by Year

2013 2013


Filter By Issues
All Issue Vol 24, No 3 (2019): SEPTEMBER 2019 Vol 24, No 2 (2019): JUNE 2019 Vol 24, No 2 (2019): JUNE 2019 Vol 24, No 1 (2019): MARCH 2019 Vol 23, No 4 (2018): DECEMBER 2018 Vol 23, No 3 (2018): SEPTEMBER 2018 Vol 23, No 2 (2018): JUNE 2018 Vol 23, No 1 (2018): MARCH 2018 Vol 22, No 4 (2017): DECEMBER 2017 Vol 22, No 3 (2017): SEPTEMBER 2017 Vol 22, No 2 (2017): JUNE 2017 Vol 22, No 1 (2017): MARCH 2017 Vol 21, No 4 (2016): DECEMBER 2016 Vol 21, No 3 (2016): SEPTEMBER 2016 Vol 21, No 2 (2016): JUNE 2016 Vol 21, No 1 (2016): MARCH 2016 Vol 20, No 4 (2015): DECEMBER 2015 Vol 20, No 3 (2015): SEPTEMBER 2015 Vol 20, No 2 (2015): JUNE 2015 Vol 20, No 1 (2015): MARCH 2015 Vol 20, No 4 (2015): DECEMBER 2015 Vol 20, No 3 (2015): SEPTEMBER 2015 Vol 20, No 2 (2015): JUNE 2015 Vol 20, No 1 (2015): MARCH 2015 Vol 20, No 1 (2015) Vol 19, No 3 (2014): SEPTEMBER 2014 Vol 19, No 2 (2014): JUNE 2014 Vol 19, No 4 (2014): DECEMBER 2014 Vol 19, No 4 (2014) Vol 19, No 3 (2014): SEPTEMBER 2014 Vol 19, No 3 (2014) Vol 19, No 2 (2014): JUNE 2014 Vol 19, No 2 (2014) Vol 19, No 1 (2014): MARCH 2014 Vol 19, No 1 (2014) Vol 18, No 4 (2013): DECEMBER 2013 Vol 18, No 4 (2013) Vol 18, No 3 (2013): SEPTEMBER 2013 Vol 18, No 3 (2013) Vol 18, No 2 (2013): JUNE 2013 Vol 18, No 2 (2013) Vol 18, No 1 (2013): MARCH 2013 Vol 18, No 1 (2013) Vol 17, No 4 (2012): DECEMBER 2012 Vol 17, No 4 (2012) Vol 17, No 3 (2012): SEPTEMBER 2012 Vol 17, No 3 (2012) Vol 17, No 2 (2012): JUNE 2012 Vol 17, No 2 (2012) Vol 17, No 1 (2012): MARCH 2012 Vol 17, No 1 (2012) Vol 16, No 4 (2011): DECEMBER 2011 Vol 16, No 4 (2011) Vol 16, No 3 (2011): SEPTEMBER 2011 Vol 16, No 3 (2011) Vol 16, No 2 (2011): JUNE 2011 Vol 16, No 2 (2011) Vol 16, No 1 (2011): MARCH 2011 Vol 16, No 1 (2011) Vol 15, No 4 (2010): DECEMBER 2010 Vol 15, No 4 (2010) Vol 15, No 3 (2010): SEPTEMBER 2010 Vol 15, No 3 (2010) Vol 15, No 2 (2010): JUNE 2010 Vol 15, No 2 (2010) Vol 15, No 1 (2010): MARCH 2010 Vol 15, No 1 (2010) Vol 14, No 4 (2009): DECEMBER 2009 Vol 14, No 4 (2009) Vol 14, No 3 (2009): SEPTEMBER 2009 Vol 14, No 3 (2009) Vol 14, No 2 (2009): JUNE 2009 Vol 14, No 2 (2009) Vol 14, No 1 (2009): MARCH 2009 Vol 14, No 1 (2009) Vol 13, No 4 (2008): DECEMBER 2008 Vol 13, No 4 (2008) Vol 13, No 3 (2008): SEPTEMBER 2008 Vol 13, No 3 (2008) Vol 13, No 2 (2008): JUNE 2008 Vol 13, No 2 (2008) Vol 13, No 1 (2008): MARCH 2008 Vol 13, No 1 (2008) Vol 12, No 4 (2007): DECEMBER 2007 Vol 12, No 4 (2007) Vol 12, No 3 (2007): SEPTEMBER 2007 Vol 12, No 3 (2007) Vol 12, No 2 (2007): JUNE 2007 Vol 12, No 2 (2007) Vol 12, No 1 (2007): MARCH 2007 Vol 12, No 1 (2007) Vol 11, No 4 (2006): DECEMBER 2006 Vol 11, No 4 (2006) Vol 11, No 3 (2006): SEPTEMBER 2006 Vol 11, No 3 (2006) Vol 11, No 2 (2006): JUNE 2006 Vol 11, No 2 (2006) Vol 11, No 1 (2006) Vol 10, No 4 (2005): DECEMBER 2005 Vol 10, No 4 (2005): DECEMBER 2005 Vol 10, No 4 (2005) Vol 10, No 3 (2005): SEPTEMBER 2005 Vol 10, No 3 (2005) Vol 10, No 2 (2005): JUNE 2005 Vol 10, No 2 (2005) Vol 10, No 1 (2005): MARCH 2005 Vol 10, No 1 (2005) Vol 9, No 4 (2004): DECEMBER 2004 Vol 9, No 4 (2004) Vol 9, No 3 (2004): SEPTEMBER 2004 Vol 9, No 3 (2004) Vol 9, No 2 (2004): JUNE 2004 Vol 9, No 2 (2004) Vol 9, No 1 (2004): MARCH 2004 Vol 9, No 1 (2004) Vol 8, No 4 (2003): DECEMBER 2003 Vol 8, No 4 (2003) Vol 8, No 3 (2003): SEPTEMBER 2003 Vol 8, No 3 (2003) Vol 8, No 2 (2003): JUNE 2003 Vol 8, No 2 (2003) Vol 8, No 1 (2003): MARCH 2003 Vol 8, No 1 (2003) Vol 7, No 4 (2002): DECEMBER 2002 Vol 7, No 4 (2002) Vol 7, No 3 (2002): SEPTEMBER 2002 Vol 7, No 3 (2002) Vol 7, No 2 (2002): JUNE 2002 Vol 7, No 2 (2002) Vol 7, No 1 (2002): MARCH 2002 Vol 7, No 1 (2002) Vol 6, No 4 (2001): DECEMBER 2001 Vol 6, No 2 (2001): JUNE 2001 Vol 6, No 1 (2001): MARCH 2001 Vol 6, No 4 (2001): DECEMBER 2001 Vol 6, No 4 (2001) Vol 6, No 3 (2001): SEPTEMBER 2001 Vol 6, No 3 (2001) Vol 6, No 2 (2001): JUNE 2001 Vol 6, No 2 (2001) Vol 6, No 1 (2001): MARCH 2001 Vol 6, No 1 (2001) Vol 5, No 4 (2000): DECEMBER 2000 Vol 5, No 3 (2000): SEPTEMBER 2000 Vol 5, No 2 (2000): JUNE 2000 Vol 5, No 1 (2000): MARCH 2000 Vol 5, No 4 (2000): DECEMBER 2000 Vol 5, No 4 (2000) Vol 5, No 3 (2000): SEPTEMBER 2000 Vol 5, No 3 (2000) Vol 5, No 2 (2000): JUNE 2000 Vol 5, No 2 (2000) Vol 5, No 1 (2000): MARCH 2000 Vol 5, No 1 (2000) Vol 4, No 4 (1999): DECEMBER 1999 Vol 4, No 3 (1999): SEPTEMBER 1999 Vol 4, No 2 (1999): JUNE 1999 Vol 4, No 1 (1999): MARCH 1999 Vol 4, No 4 (1999): DECEMBER 1999 Vol 4, No 4 (1999) Vol 4, No 3 (1999): SEPTEMBER 1999 Vol 4, No 3 (1999) Vol 4, No 2 (1999): JUNE 1999 Vol 4, No 2 (1999) Vol 4, No 1 (1999): MARCH 1999 Vol 4, No 1 (1999) Vol 3, No 4 (1998) Vol 3, No 3 (1998) Vol 3, No 2 (1998) Vol 3, No 1 (1998) Vol 2, No 4 (1998) Vol 3, No 4 (1998) Vol 3, No 3 (1998) Vol 3, No 2 (1998) Vol 3, No 1 (1998) Vol 2, No 4 (1998) Vol 2, No 3 (1997) Vol 2, No 3 (1997) Vol 2, No 2 (1996) Vol 2, No 1 (1996) Vol 2, No 2 (1996) Vol 2, No 1 (1996) Vol 1, No 3 (1995) Vol 1, No 2 (1995) Vol 1, No 1 (1995) Vol 1, No 3 (1995) Vol 1, No 2 (1995) Vol 1, No 1 (1995) More Issue