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Ahmadi Riyanto
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medpub@litbang.deptan.go.id
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ahmadi_puslitbangnak@yahoo.com
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Jawa barat
INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
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Articles 9 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 18, No 1 (2013): MARCH 2013" : 9 Documents clear
Response of sheep fed on concentrate containing feather meal and supplemented with mineral Chromium D, Yulistiani; W, Puastuti; IW, Mathius
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 18, No 1 (2013): MARCH 2013
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (164.645 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v18i1.257

Abstract

A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of substitution of protein concentrate with feather meal supplemented with organic chromium mineral on performance of lambs. Twenty five male lambs were fed basal feed of fresh chopped king grass ad libitum and were allotted to either one of five different supplements (five dietary treatments): Control (C); 10% of protein in concentrate was substituted by feather meal (FM); 10% of protein in concentrate was substituted by feather meal supplemented with Cr yeast at 1.5 mg (FMCrOrg); 10% of protein in concentrate was substituted by feather meal supplemented with Cr inorganic which equal to the amount of Cr bound in yeast (FMCr); Concentrate control supplemented with 1.5 mg Cr yeast (CCrOrg). Cr-organic was synthesized by incorporating CrCl3 in fermented rice flour by Rhizopus sp. The mineral is mixed with feather meal as a mineral carrier. Sheep in all treatments received iso protein concentrate. Parameters observed were body weight change, feed consumption and nutrient digestibility. Results shows that there was no significant effect of diet treatments on average daily gain (ADG), dry matter consumption and feed conversion, with the average value of 75.4 gr/day; 74.9 g/BW0.75 and 9.9 respectively, However diet treatment of organic chromium and protein substitution with feather meal (FMCrOrg) showed tendency of having higher ADG (83.57 g/h/d). Average nutrient digestibility of dry matter, organic matter and NDF were 68.7; 69.6 and 60.9%, respectively. However NDF digestibility of FMCrOrg tended to be higher than other treatment (67.0%). It is concluded that partial substitution of protein concentrate by feather meal and 1.5 mg Cr-organic supplementation did not affect sheep performance. Key Words: Chromium, Sheep, Feather Meal, Supplementation
The content of melamine in milk based products, and milk powders analyzed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry S, Rachmawati; PM, Widiyanti
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 18, No 1 (2013): MARCH 2013
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (242.643 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v18i1.261

Abstract

Melamine is a white crystal of organic compound has a molecular weight of 126.12, difficult to solve in water. Cases of illegally adding melamine in milk powder is subjected to increase the nitrogen content of milk, because melamine contains high nitrogen (66%), so when milk is tested, seems contains high protein. This paper presented data the content of melamine in products based milk, and milk powders which entered and marketed in Indonesia. Melamine analysis is done by LC- MS 2010 EV, Shimadzu. Confirmation and validation tests indicate that melamine scanning found at m/z = 127, suitable system of analysis with relative standard deviation (RSD) given of 1,18% (< 2,0%). Accuracy test gave the average of 89.1% recovery, detection limit of 5 ppb and limit of quantition 7 ppb. About 91.3% samples (n = 46) collected from animal quarantine Tanjung Priok contained melamine in the range of 6.7 ppb to 61.5 ppb which is 1/49 to 1/16 times less than standard limit. Whereas about 40%, 14 out of 35 samples collected from Bandung and Jakarta supermarket was not detected of melamine, and 60% samples positive contain melamine in the range of 5,1 to 26,5 ppb (1/200 to 1/38 standard limit). However, all the samples analyzed contain melamine below the standard limit of 1 ppm determined by WHO/FAO. Key Words: Melamine, Milk Powder, Milk Based Products, LCMS
Impact of sheep stocking density and breed on behaviour of newly regrouped adult rams SEC, Engeldal; ., Subandriyo; E, Handiwirawan; RR, Noor
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 18, No 1 (2013): MARCH 2013
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (169.915 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v18i1.253

Abstract

Placing animals in cages with certain density and good grouping were two important aspects needed in intensive livestock production system to produce optimal production and animal welfare. The objective of this study was to examine effect of stocking density, breed and elapse of time on behaviour of newly regrouped, unacquainted adult rams from three sheep breeds i.e. Barbados Blackbelly Cross, Local Garut and Composite Garut, as possible factor causing variation in welfare status. Instantaneous scan sampling was used for recording sheep behaviour at three different stocking densities. Thirty-six adult rams were used in this research and divided into three groups (n = 12) on the basis of breed. At each stocking density four rams of the same breed were observed during two consecutive days. The recorded behaviours were agonistic-, self-care-, exploratory-, aberrant-, mating-, locomotive- and standing behaviour. The results showed that during the entire experiment agonistic behaviour was observed at the highest frequency. Stocking density was found to have a significant effect on exploratory-, locomotive- and standing behaviour. The effect of breed was found to cause significant differences in agonistic-, self-care-, aberrant- and mating behaviour. Significant differences were also found between day 1 and day 2 of regrouping for agonistic-, exploratory, self-care- and mating behaviour. It is concluded that the three breeds do differ in their behavioural reactions to different stocking density levels and time needed for adaptation after regrouping. Key Words: Sheep, Stocking Density, Behaviour, Animal Welfare
Artificial neural networks simulation to define critical temperature of Fries Holland based on physiological responses D, Suherman; BP, Purwanto; W, Manalu; IG, Permana
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 18, No 1 (2013): MARCH 2013
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1333.36 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v18i1.262

Abstract

Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) simulation for industrial engineering is used to define critical temperature of Fries Holland (FH) heifer based on physiological responses on models to predict heart rate and respiratory rate, using ambient temperature and humidity inputs. The research was conducted using six dairy cattles in Bogor and in Jakarta. The heifers were fed at 6 am and 3 pm daily. The environmental condition (Ta, Rh, THI, and Va) and physiological responses (heart rate and respiration rate) were then measured for 14 days in two months at 1 h intervals started from 5 am to 8 pm. By using this ANN simulation, the critical temperature for FH heifer were defined, from heart rate at Ta 24,5°C and Rh 78% at Bogor, and at Ta 23,5°C and Rh 88% at Jakarta, from respiratory rate at Ta 22,5°C and Rh 78% at Bogor, and at Ta 23,5°C and Rh 78% at Jakarta. The respiratory rate on FH heifer was more sensitive to stress due to Ta and Rh fluctuation than the heart rate. Key Words: Artificial Neural Network, Critical Temperature, Heifer, Physiological Respons
Physiological responses of Indigofera zollingeriana, a feed plant at different levels of drought stress and trimming interval I, Herdiawan; L, Abdullah; ., Yoki; PDMH, Karti; N, Hidayati
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 18, No 1 (2013): MARCH 2013
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (189.8 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v18i1.258

Abstract

The objectives of this experiment were to evaluate the effect of drought stress and trimming intervals on physiological responses of Indigofera zollingeriana. The experiment was arranged in a completely randomized design (CRD), 3x3 factorial and each treatment had four replications. The first factor consisted of 3 level of drought stress i.e: 100% field capacity (FC) (as a control), 50% FC, and 25% FC.  The second factor was comprised of 3 trimming intervals, those were at 60, 90 and 120 days. The observed variables were leaf water potential, relative water content, proline, and water soluble carbohydrate (WSC) concentrations. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and differences between treatments were tested by LSD. The results showed that there were no interaction (P<0,05) between drought stress and trimming interval on all observed variables. Drought stress treatment significantly (P<0,05) decreased leaf water potensial and relative water content, whereas proline, and water soluble carbohydrate (WSC) contents increased. Trimming interval significantly (P < 0.05) on leaf water potensial, and water soluble carbohydrate, whereas the relative water content and proline content were not significantly. Key Words: Indigofera zollingeriana, Drought stress, Trimming interval, Physiologycal response
Improving nutrient values of palm kernel cake (PKC) by reducing shell contamination and enzymes supplementation AP, Sinurat; T, Purwadaria; T, Pasaribu
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 18, No 1 (2013): MARCH 2013
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (163.05 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v18i1.254

Abstract

Inclusion of palm kernel cake (PKC) in poultry feed is limited due to shell contamination and its low nutritive values, despite the increase of PKC production. Therefore, a series of experiment was conducted in order to improve nutritive values of palm kernel cake (PKC) by sieving and enzyme supplementation. First experiment was designed to reduce shell content using shiever with different diameters (1, 2 and 4 mm). Shell content was measured manually to determine the effect of the sieving. The second experiment was carried out by blowing the after sieving at 2 mm shieve PKC, to produced heavy, medium and light fractions. The shell content and nutrient contents of the medium and light fractions were compared to those of unsieved PKC. In the third experiment, the sieved PKC was supplemented with 2 enzymes with different concentrations, i.e., BS4 at 10, 15 and 20 ml/kg PKC and a commercial multi enzymes at 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 g/kg PKC. Digestibility of nutrients (dry matter, crude protein and TME) were measured by force feeding method with six replications for each sample. Results of the study showed that sieving with 2 mm diameter siever without blowing was effective in reducing  about 50% of PKC shell and improved crude protein, ether extract and amino acids, contents and reduced the crude fiber content of the PKC. Supplementation of enzymes improved the digestibility of dry matter, crude protein and the true metabolisable energy (TME) of the PKC. Optimum improvement was obtained when PKC was supplemented with 20 ml BS4 enzymes/kg PKC. Similar improvement was obtained by supplementation of commercial multi enzymes at 2 g/kg PKC. Therefore, in order to improve the nutritive values of PKC, it is suggested  to sieve the PKC followed by supplementation of enzyme prior to feeding. Key Words: Palm Kernel Cake, Sieve, Enzymes, Nutritive Values.
Effect of vitamin C in pineapple rind (Ananas comosus L. Merr) on thyroxine hormone and anti stress on broilers in tropical region E, Syahruddin; E, Herawaty; ., Yoki
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 18, No 1 (2013): MARCH 2013
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (191.232 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v18i1.259

Abstract

This study was aimed to determine the right level of vitamin C in extracted pineapple rind to prevent heat stress effects so it does not interfere with the performance of broiler chickens. This study was done in a series of field experiments. Experiments in the field/cage was biological test of the effect of vitamin C from pineapple rind on production responses (percentage of body weight gain and carcass) and physiological responses (thyroxine hormone levels) in broiler chicken aged 3 weeks as many as 360 of Strain Arbor acress. The basic design used was CRD 3 x 4 factorial models and 3 replications with 10 chickens for each box, as factor 1: Room temperature (21 : 27 and 33ºC), and factor II: level of vitamin C in the pineapple rind (0:500:1000 and 1500 ppm). The data obtained were statistically analyzed using SAS program package, and if it showed any significant effect then followed by Duncans test/DMRT. Variables measured were body weight gain, carcass percentage and levels of thyroxine hormone of broiler. Results showed that addition of pineapple rind containing 500 ppm vitamin C in the drinking water reduced heat stress in chicken that were kept at temperature of 27ºC, while at 33ºC needed 1000 ppm vitamin C. Both treatments increase level of thyroxine hormone, produce weight gain equal to control, more over, there was no effect on the percentage of carcasses. Key Words: Ananas comosus L. Merr, Vitamin C, Tyrosine, Anti-Stress, Broiler Chickens
Effectivity of santoquin and vitamin E suplementation on fat value, fatty acid composition and sensory quality of local duck meat M, Purba; PP, Ketaren; EB, Laconi; CH, Wijaya
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 18, No 1 (2013): MARCH 2013
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (282.572 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v18i1.256

Abstract

An experiment was conducted to identify the effectivity of antioxidant supplemented in ration for fat and fatty acid consentration and sensory quality of male local duck meat. Two hundred and eighty day old ducks (dod) reared for ten weeks were allotted to either one of 10 treatments in 4 replications with 7 ducks/replication for each treatment. The treatments were: (R0) basal-diet (RB) without antioxidant (control); (R1) RB+50 ppm santoquin (Sq)+100 IU vitamin E (VE); (R2) RB+50 ppm Sq+200 IU VE; (R3) RB+50 ppm Sq+300 IU VE; (R4) RB+100 ppm Sq+100 IU VE; (R5) RB+100 ppm Sq+200 IU VE; (R6) RB+100 ppm Sq+300 IU VE; (R7) RB+150 ppm Sq+100 IU VE; (R8) RB+150 ppm Sq+200 IU VE; (R9) RB+150 ppm Sq+300 IU VE. The experiment was conducted based on completely randomized design with one of the treatments as a control and the others were with antioxidants supplementations. The variables observed were: fat concentration, fatty acid composition and concentration, as well as sensory quality (off odor intensity and description values) in male duck meat. Result showed that Sq+VE supplementation could reduce fat content in duck meat. R1 and R4 were the best level to reduce fat contents in fresh meat, but in boiled meat R8 and R9 treatment was the best. Total composition and the ratio of unsaturated fatty acids were higher then those of saturated fatty acids. The fatty acid concentrations of linoleat (C18:2) and arakidonat (C20:4) increased parareled with  the antioxidant supplementations in fresh and boiled duck meat. Sq and VE supplementations significantly decreased (P<0,05) intensity off odor (fishy odor) in fresh or boiled duck meat, and 50 ppm Sq+100 IU VE or 100 ppm Sq+100 IU VE was the best treatment to reduce the intensity off odor (fishy odor)on fresh meat, while 150 ppm Sq+200 IU VE or 150 ppm Sq+300 IU VE was on boiled duck meat. It is concluded that lipid oxidation was effectively protected by Sq+VE supplementations resulted is reduced intensity off odor, while the sensory quality of local duck meat increased. Key Words: Local Duck, Antioxidants, Carcass, Fatty Acids, Off Odor, Sensory
Isolation and number of circulated primordial germ cells (circulated-PGCs) on stages of embryonic development of Gaok chicken T, Kostaman; TL, Yusuf; M, Fahrudin; MA, Setiadi
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 18, No 1 (2013): MARCH 2013
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (260.474 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v18i1.260

Abstract

Avian primordial germ cell (PGCs) show a unique migration pathway during early development. During the early embryonic development, as soon as the formation of blood vessels, PGCs enter the circulatory system and migrate to the gonadal primordial. The aim of this study was to examine the number of circulated-PGCs from Gaok chicken at different developmental stages of embryo. One hundred fertile eggs were divided into 5 groups and incubated in a portable incubator at 38oC and humidity 60%. Hatching was set according to the embryonic development stage between 14-18. The blood collection was done through the dorsal aorta using micropipette under microscope. The collected blood was grouped based on the embryonic stages and placed on a 1.5 ml eppendorf tube which had been filled with 1.000 µl of Calcium and Magnesium-free phosphate buffered saline (PBS -). The PGCs were then purified using nycodenz density gradient centrifugation. The results showed that the average number of circulated-PGCs per embryo from Gaok chicken were significantly affected by the stage of embryonic development (P < 0.05). The number of circulated-PGCs at stages 14, 15, 16, 17 and 18 were 42.8 ± 8.9, 51.0 ± 5.8, 37.6 ± 5.9, 32.8 ± 3.6 and 32.6 ± 3.2, respectively. However, the number of circulated-PGCs was no different between stage of 17 and 18. At Gaok chicken, the number of circulated-PGCs reach the peak at stage 15, it is recommended that collection of PGCs embryonic chicken from blood circulation was the best on stage 15. This information is useful in efficiency production of germline chimera and to preserve PGCs of other Indonesian native chicken. Key Words: Gaok Chicken, PGCs, Embryonic Development Stages

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