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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
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Articles 20 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 17, No 3 (2012)" : 20 Documents clear
Effect of glutathione and bovine seminal plasma in lactose extender on viability of swamp buffalo frozen semen Sianturi, Riasari Gail; Purwantara, B; Supriatna, I; ., Amrozi; Situmorang, P
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 17, No 3 (2012)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v17i3.697

Abstract

The aim of the study was to investigate the effect on viability of frozen swamp buffalo semen of glutathione and bovine seminal plasma in lactose extender. Semen from two swamp buffalo bulls was collected twice weekly using an artificial vagina. Pooled, good-quality fresh semen was divided into three parts and centrifuged at 3,000 rpm for 15 minutes in preparation for three treatments-substitution of buffalo seminal plasma with zero, 50 or 100% bovine seminal plasma (BS0, BS50 and BS100, respectively). Each semen aliquot was then divided in two parts, on which was diluted with lactose extender containing 1 mM glutathione (GSH) and the other diluted with lactose extender without GSH (0 mM GSH). Extended semen from all six treatments was cooled to 5oC and then frozen in 0.25 ml straws.  Mean motility percentages 0 and 30 minutes post thaw (PTM 0′ and 30′) with GSH were 38.33 and 34.29%, significantly higher (P < 0.05) than treatments without GSH (31.67 and 25.95%). PTM 0′ and 30′ were also higher (P < 0.05) with no substitution of bovine seminal plasma (BS0) than when buffalo seminal plasma was replaced with bovine seminal plasma at either 50 or 100%. Averages were 40.00 vs 34.46 and 30.54% (BS0 vs BS50 and BS100) at thawing and 36.96 vs 28.36 and 25.36% 30 minutes post-thaw. Mean percentages of live sperm (LD), intact plasma membrane (MPU) and intact acrosomal membrane (TAU) at thawing were not significantly different with or without addition of GSH. However,at 30′ post thawing, TAU and MPU were significantly higher in GSH treatments than inthose without GSH:  61.50 vs. 58.19% (MPU) and 59.81 vs. 57.38% (TAU). Mean percentages of LD, TAU and MPU 30′post thawing were higher with no substitution ofbuffalo seminal plasma (BS0) (P < 0.05) than to BS50 and BS100 treatments. In conclusion, the addition of glutathione (GSH) improved the quality of frozen swamp buffalo semen, but the partial substitution of buffalo seminal plasma with bovine seminal plasmaprovided no beneficial effects. Key Words: Swamp buffalo, Semen, Antioxidant, Glutathione, Seminal plasma
Behaviour and production traits correlation of five breeds of sheep Handiwirawan, Eko; Noor, R.R; Sumantri, C; ., Subandriyo
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 17, No 3 (2012)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v17i3.698

Abstract

Information about correlations among behavioral traits and production traits may facilitate using easily measured traits to be used as alternative criteria for indirect selection to improve other traits in sheep. The purpose of this study was to estimate correlations among behavioral and production traits of five breeds of sheep.  A total of 128 head of weaned lambs and 168 ewes with nursing lambs of five breeds were used in this study, i.e. Barbados Black Belly Cross (BC), Composite Garut (KG), Local Garut (LG), Composite Sumatra (KS) and St. Croix Cross (SC). Temperament was assessed in a test arena, for subsequent association with growth rate and ewe productivity. Analysis of variance of production and behavioral traits among breeds was carried out using PROC GLM of SAS software Ver. 9.0.  PROCCORR was used to estimate correlations among production and behavioral variables. Weaned lambs that were more docile towards the observer had higher daily gains.  Ewes that bleated more frequently when separated from their lamb had higher lamb weaning weights and lamb survival than ewes bleating fewer times under the same conditions. In BC ewes, a positive correlation was observed between frequency of bleats and lamb survival. Key Words: Sheep, Behavior, Growth rate, Ewe productivity
Ability of fiber bacteria isolated from buffalo rumen in digesting various sources of forage Prihantoro, Iwan; Toharmat, T; Evvyernie, D; ., Suryani; Abdullah, L
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 17, No 3 (2012)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v17i3.699

Abstract

Local buffalo rumen fluid is a source of fiber digesting bacteria. Such bacteria presumably are well adapted to feed stuffs derived from agricultural byproducts with low quality. The purposes of this study were: (1) to isolate the fiber-digesting bacteria from buffalo rumen fluid, (2) to determine the fiber digesting characteristics and adaptability of such bacteria, and (3) to characterize the bacterial diversity.  Rumen fluids for the experiment were collected from buffaloes slaughtered at the Faculty of Animal Science, Bogor Agricultural University abattoir. Fiber-digesting bacteria were isolated using McDougall buffer supplemented with fibrous feed. A factorial experiment was conducted to study characteristics and adaptability of the bacteria using two factors: the type of bacteria and type of feed source of the fiber. Diversity among the bacteria was analyzed using the NTSys2.10 program.Results showed that nine bacterial isolates had a high adaptability to fiber feed based on CMCase. The highest CMCase activity bacteria for Pennisetum purpureum were A9 (11.36±1.70 unit/ml/h), A3 (11.22±0.60 unit/ml/h) and A42 (10.62±1.96 unit/ml/h). CMCase activity of fiber digesting bacteria from buffalo rumen fluid was not correlated with the number of bacteria in the culture. Based on genetic similarity, nine isolates were grouped into five types having similarity≥46%. Key Words: Buffalo Rumen Fluid, Fiber-Digesting Bacteria, Low Quality Forage
The use of propolis to increase productivity of Peranakan Ongole Haryanto, Budi; Hasan, Z; ., Kuswandi; Artika, I-M
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 17, No 3 (2012)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v17i3.700

Abstract

Propolis is a complex substance found in the bee hives and it has medicinal advantages for many diseases.  It contains various chemicals with specific characteristics such as anti cancer, anti virus, anti fungi and anti bacteria. Propolis contains antioxydant. Propolis from Trigona spp. was used in the present experiment. Eighteen (18) heads of PO (Ongole grade) cattle were individually fed in a flock housing and randomized to receive each feeding treatment. Propolis supplements were given in a mixture with the concentrate. Similar concentrate was fed to all individuals. Three feeding treatments, i.e., R0 = Control, without propolis, R1 = nano-propolis extracted with ethanol, and offered at 2% every 7 days, and R2 = raw propolis were applied. Concentrate intake was recorded daily by substracting the orts from the quantity of offered feed. Individual weight changes were recorded monthly before morning feeding time to calculate the average daily weight gain. The results indicated positive responses to feeding nano-propolis or raw-propolis as compared to the control group. Raw-propolis seemed to be better than the nano-propolis. Concentrate intake in the control group was higher than in the propolis supplemented group. The concentrate intake may reach 7-8 kg/head/day in average, while the average daily weight gain may reach 1 kg. The average daily weight gain of individuals supplemented with propolis were 8-11% over the control group. However, if these values were compared to the ADG of PO cattle in villages (0.6 kg/day), it was more than 30% than the general performance. It was concluded that the use of propolis, either prepared by nano-technology or just raw-propolis, can be applied to increase the PO cattle productivity. Key Words: PO Cattle, Propolis, Production, Efficiency
Improving microbial protein synthesis in the rumen of sheep fed fresh tofu waste by crude tannin extract of Acacia mangium Wina, Elizabeth; Yulistiani, D; IWR, Susana; Tangendjaja, B
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 17, No 3 (2012)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v17i3.701

Abstract

Tannin can be found in many tropical plants and the presence of tannin may reduce the nutritional value of feed. However, it can give beneficial effect as it protects the protein from its excessive degradation in the rumen. Tofu waste is abundant in a country, including Indonesia, where tofu is produced widely. A feeding trial on sheep to study the effect of tannin on microbial protein synthesis and condition of rumen fermentation, digestibility and N retention of feed containing tofu waste was conducted. Fifteen sheep were allocated to one of 3 treatments, i.e: 1) control treatment, feed without tannin, 2) feed + tannin treatment and 3) feed + tannin + polyethylene glycol (PEG) treatment. The sheep was placed in the individual metabolism cage. They were fed with treatment feed for 14 days and then, the following 7 days, faeces and urine were collected. At the end of the treatment, rumen fluid was taken from each sheep before and after feeding. Rumen parameter (pH, ammonia, SCFA, protozoa) and microbial protein synthesis, digestibility, nitrogen retention were observed. Results showed that inclusion of 4% tannin in the feed depressed ammonia production in the rumen of sheep before and 3 hours after morning feeding. Total SCFA and individual SCFA were not different among treatments. Tannin did not affect daily feed intake. Tannin lowered the dry matter, organic matter and protein digestibilities but it significantly reduced ADF digestibility (P < 0.05) and tended to reduce NDF digestibility (P < 0.1). However, tannin increased the microbial protein synthesis. PEG addition was expected to bind tannin and alleviate the negative effect of tannin. Key Words: Tannin, Acacia Mangium, Polyethylene Glycol, Tofu waste, Digestibility
Nitrogen kinetics in growing sheep consuming Leucaena leucocephala, Gliricidia sepium or Calliandra calothyrsus as a sole diet Widiawati, Yeni; Winugroho, M; Teleni, E
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 17, No 3 (2012)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v17i3.702

Abstract

The utilization of protein feed by animals are influenced by the process of its degradation in the rumen and its digestion in the intestine. The extent of its degradation and digestion are influenced by the form of protein and the present of secondary compound in the plant. The aim of the study was to determine the amont of protein in the three leguminouse shrubs utilized by the animals. The study on the utilization of protein from leguminouse shrub was undertaken by investigate the nitrogen kinetic in 24 head of growing sheep (BW 23kg) consuming Leucaena leucocephala, Gliricidia sepium, Calliandra callothyrsus leaves and Rhodes grass hay. The diets were fed every two hours starting at 07:00 am. The animals were divided into four groups of dietary treatment namely LL, GS, CC and CG groups which were fed by Leucaena, Gliricidia, Calliandra dan Rhodes grass leaves, respectively. The Rhode grass, as control diet, was mixed with 1.4% of urea to increase the nitrogen offered to the animals up to 150 g/day. Thus all the four diets were offered the same amount of nitrogen/day. Measurements were undertaken on feed utilization and nitrogen kinetics in experimental animals. The amount of nitrogen consumed then undegraded in the rumen as well as undigested in the intestine was significant higher in CC group (P < 0.01) then those in LL, GS and CG groups. The value was 67% for CC group then followed by 35% for LL group and 33% for GS group. The amount of nitrogen degraded in the rumen thus lost in urine was significantly higher in animals fed GS and LL leaves compared to those in animals fed CC diet (P < 0.01). The values were 46% for GS and LL group and only 16% for CC group. The amount of nitrogen retained by the animals was similar among the three groups being 17-21% (P > 0.05). The Plasma urea concentration, urea entry rate and urea in urine animals were similar in LL and GS groups but higher than those in CC group. The values were 0.86; 0.8; 0.46 mg/ml (P < 0.01) and 79; 78; 50 g/d (P < 0.01) and 26.7; 24.5; 7.3 g/d (P < 0.01) for LL, GS and CC groups, respectively. The conclusion is most of nitrogen from Calliandra was un-degraded and un-digested in the rumen and intestine thus excreted through feces, while most of the protein in Leucaena and Gliricidia was degraded in the rumen thus excreted through urine. Key Words: Leucaena, Gliricidia, Calliandra, Nitrogen-Kinetics, Urea Entry Rate
improving performance of laying hens Sinurat, A.P; Ketaren, P; Cowieson, A.J; Bento, M.H.L
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 17, No 3 (2012)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v17i3.703

Abstract

A trial was conducted in order to study the effect of the supplementation of Avizyme 1500® (Danisco Animal Nutrition, Marlborough, UK) on the performance of laying hens for one year. A control diet based on corn – soybean meal was formulated to meet nutrient requirement of ISA Brown laying hens. Two treatments, the control diet (C) and C + 1000 g Avizyme/tonne diet were tested. Each diet was fed to 80 birds (20 replicates of 4 birds) from 20 to 72 weeks of age, and performances of birds (feed intake, egg production, egg size, egg mass, feed conversion ratio, and egg quality) were measured. All data were subject to analyses of variance following the t-test. Results showed that the addition of Avizyme 1500 to the feed reduced feed intake by 4% (P < 0.01), mortality by 75 % or from 15% to 3.75% (P < 0.01) and improved the feed conversion ratio by 3 % (P < 0.05).  The high mortality of the control treatment (15%) is explained by an E.coli infection that was observed following the post-mortem examination of dead birds. The egg production (HD and HH), egg size and egg mass however were not significantly affected by the Avizyme supplementation. Egg quality (HU, yolk colour score, yolk weight and shell thickness) was not significantly affected by Avizyme supplementation. It can be concluded that the supplementation of 1000 g Avizyme /tonne of diet improved feed efficiency and this was mediated via a reduction in feed intake. Key Words: Egg Production, Enzyme, Feed Convertion Ratio, Egg Quality
Effect of fibre hydrolytic enzymes supplementation on performances of broiler chickens fed diets containing rice bran Ketaren, Pius P; Purwadaria, T; Sinurat, A.P; Haryati, T
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 17, No 3 (2012)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v17i3.704

Abstract

Use of the rice bran as poultry feed is restricted by its high fibre content as poultry is unable to hydrolyse the fibre into available energy. This experiment was aimed The aim of this experiment was to investigate the effect of crude enzymes supplementation on performances of broiler chickens fed diets containing 30% rice bran. The experiment was based on completely randomized design with nine experimental diets. Diets 1-5 contained 5% less than recommended protein and energy, based on determined metabolizable energy (ME) content in the rice bran at 2040 kcal/kg, without taking into account on the beneficial effect of the enzyme supplementation. These diets were: 1. A control diet (D2040, without enzymes); 2. D2040 + E. javanicum (BS4) + P. nalgiovense (S11); 3. D2040 + BS4 + A. niger; 4. D2040 + BS4 + commercial enzymes (CE); 5. D2040 +  B. pumilus (PU4-2) + CE. Four other experimental diets contained the same protein and energy levels as in the diets 1-5, but had taken into account on the beneficial effect of the enzyme supplementation,. These diets were:  6. D2702 + BS4 + S11; 7. D2650 + BS4 + A. niger; 8. D2465 + BS4 + CE ;and 9. D2465 + PU4-2+ CE. Each experimental diet was repeated six times and each replication consists of 5 day-old broiler chickens. Results showed that FCR of the chickens fed D2040 + PU4-2 + CE  diet (FCR = 1.38) and D2465 + PU4-2 + CE diet (FCR = 1.46) were significantly (P < 0.01) improved compared to the control diet  (FCR = 1.64). This experiment strongly shows that supplementation of PU4-2 + CE enzymes significantly (P < 0.01) improved feed efficiency of the broiler chickens by 11-16%. Key Words: Fibre Hydrolytic Enzymes, Broiler Chickens, Performances
Strategic control of acute diarrhea of newborn calves Chotiah, Siti
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 17, No 3 (2012)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v17i3.705

Abstract

Economic performance of beef cattle operations can be severely hampered by acute calfhood diarrhea. Accordingly, a study was conducted at Bbalitvet to identify the causal agents, reduce clinical incidence, and increase body weight gain of newborn calves. One potential control is application of suitable vaccines to pregnant cows. The study was begun by identifying cases of diarrhea followed by isolation and identification of the causal agents in 12 beef cattle farms in West Java. A field trial was then designed for controlling calf diarrhea in such farms. Inactive vaccines Ecoli-Closvak polivalen were administered to pregnant cows to increase specific resistance of the newborn calves. At 2 months prepartum, 12 pregnant cows were assigned either to a vaccination or a placebo group, with a booster vaccination 3 weeks prior to parturition. Strict hygenic management was provided to both groups, and all calves were provided adequately with colostrum.  Subjects were observed for 5 months, starting from the time of initial vaccination until the calves were 3 months of age. In the initial farm surveys, entero-pathogenic bacteria such as Escherichia coli serotype K99 and Clostridium perfringens type A and C were isolated and identified in fecal samples from 4 beef cattle farms in 3 districts (Garut, Tasikmalaya, Ciamis) and 2 beef cattle farms in 2 districts (Tasikmalaya and Ciamis) of West Java. In the vaccination trial, good immune responses to E. coli and C. perfringens alpha toxin measured by ELISA were observed. Application of effective control of calf diarrhea including vaccination and good livestock management showed good results. No death or signs of diarrhea were found in the new born calves up to 3 months of age. The rate of body weight gain was significantly higher in calves of vaccinated dams than in calves of non-vaccinated dams. Key Words: Strategic control, Calf diarrhea
Campylobacter jejuni seroepidemiology in native chicken Rosyidi, Anwar; Budiharta, S; Asmara, W; Yudhabuntara, D
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 17, No 3 (2012)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v17i3.706

Abstract

Campylobacter jejuni is responsible for about 90% of cases of Campylobacteriosis in humans with gastroenteritis. Healthy chickens can carry Campylobacter spp. in the intestinal tract. Efforts to reduce exposure to Campylobacteriosis by humans may be enhanced by knowledge of its prevalence in poultry. This study aimed to identify factors associated with seropositive response to C. jejuni in native chickens in Mataram. Detection of C. jejuni was accomplished using an immunochromatographic serological method. Association between Campylobacter jejuni seropositive response as the dependent variable with various independent variables was analyzed using χ² (Chi square) and Odds Ratio (OR). A total of 216 chicken samples were examined and 44 chicken owners were interviewed and their farms examined. Results showed the prevalence of serological response to C. jejuni in chicken samples to be as high as 35.6% and that as many as 70.5% of farms had affected chickens.  Age of the chicken was the variable most closely associated with incidence of seropositive response, birds older than 3 months more likely to be affected. Variables at the farm level associated with variation in seropositive response were cage type, cage floor material, and origin of drinking water, surface water sources being less desirable. Key Words: Campylobacter jejuni, Seroepidemiology, Native Chicken, Mataram

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