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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
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Articles 20 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 17, No 2 (2012)" : 20 Documents clear
Exogenous progesterone treatment during pregnancy for increasing milk production and growth of kids of Etawa grade goat Sutama, I-Ketut; Budiarsana, I-G.M; ., Supriyati; ., Hastono
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 17, No 2 (2012)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v17i2.681

Abstract

Naturally, progesterone in ruminant is mainly produced by corpus luteum and it is reponsible for maintaining pregnancy, and affecting udder development and milk production. Exogenous progesterone treatment is expected to give similar positive effect on milk production as the endogenous progesterone does. Fourty mature Etawa grade (PE) does were synchronized for oestrus using Controlled Internal Drug Release (CIDR) followed by natural mating. Does then were treated with CIDR intravaginally, as a source of exogenous progesterone, at day 15-75 after mating (Group A), day 75-135 after mating (Group B), and without exogenous progesterone treatment (Control). Blood samples were taken before and after exogenous progesterone treatment for determination of progesterone concentrations. Soon after birth, kids were separated from their respective dams and they were milk fed through milk bottle. Feed consumption and milk production were measured daily, while bodyweight was measured forthnightly. Results showed that response of does following exogenous progesterone treatment was not expressed by an increase in progesterone concentration in the blood plasm. However, treatment group showed kid with birthweight of 10-13% higher compared to Control Group. In relation to milk yield, birthweight and pre-weaning growth of kids, the positive responses of exogenous progesterone treatment were not significant, though there was a substantial decrease (71.2%) in pre-weaning kid’s mortality. Key Words: Oestrous Synchronization, Progesterone, Milk, Etawa Goat
Optimizing artificial insemination on swamp buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) through synchronization of estrus and ovulation Sianturi, Riasari Gail; Purwantara, B; Supriatna, I; ., Amrozi; Situmorang, P
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 17, No 2 (2012)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v17i2.682

Abstract

Artificial insemination (AI) program in swamp buffalo will be more efficient by implementing synchronization of estrus and ovulation. By synchronizing of ovulation, AI can be done at a fixed time schedule without concerning to estrus detection. Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone (GnRH) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) have been used in protocols of estrus synchronization to induce ovulation. A study of AI in swamp buffalo was conducted on 83 buffaloes to evaluate the impact of protocol of estrus synchronization on reproductive efficiency of swamp buffalo. The three protocols used were Ovsynch (GnRH-PGF2α-GnRH-AI), convensional (PGF2a-PGF2a-AI) and Select-Synch (GnRH-PGF2a-AI). Inducing of ovulation were done by administration of GnRH or hCG after prostaglandin (PGF2α) injection. AI was done at 18 and 24 hour after the second GnRH injection (66 hours and 72 hours after PGF2α injection) for Ovsynch method and 72 hours after the last PGF2α injection for convensional and Select-Synch methods. Parameters observed were percentage of estrus and pregnancy from the three estrus synchronization protocols and the differences were analysed by statistics. All of buffaloes (100%) in the three synchronization protocols showed estrus behavior prior to AI. The percentage of pregnancy was 64.71; 77.14 and 83.87% for the Ovsynch, convensional and Select-synch respectively and there was no significantly different (P > 0.05) among the three protocols. hCG administration after the last PGF2α also did not affect pregnancy rate, ie: 76.47 vs 77.78% (with hCG vs without hCG) for the convensional and 88.24 vs 78.57% for the Select-Synch. It is concluded that the synchronization of estrus protocols in this study can synchronize the estrous and ovulation and AI can be done in a fixed-timed and could reach better pregnancy rate of swamp buffalo. Key Words: Swamp Buffalo, Synchronization, Estrus, Ovulation, AI
Reproductive performances of Boe, Kacang and Boerka does Elieser, Simon; ., Sumadi; Suparta, G; ., Subandriyo
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 17, No 2 (2012)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v17i2.683

Abstract

Does reproduction performance could be expressed by her ability to give birth and to give milk to their kids during the pre-weaning period. This study was aimed to evaluate the reproductive performance of Boer, Kacang and Boerka does; and was carried out for two years at Research Institute for Goat Production, Sungei Putih. The materials used were goats owned by the institute. The parameters observed were: litter size, parity of does, preweaning mortality, kidding interval and sex ratio of kids. The rate of reproduction of the does was estimated using Amir and Knipscheer methods and were statistically analyzed using General linear model. Results showed that litter size and kidding interval of Boer goats were higher (P < 0.05) then that of Kacang goats, while the Boerka goats was in between. The mortality at preweaning of Boer goats was lower (P < 0.05) then that of Kacang goats, while the Boerka goats was in between. The percentage of kid sex ratio of three breeds were fluctuated. Parity of does had significant effect on all reproduction traits (P < 0.05) except for sex ratio of kids. The does reproduction was smallest at the first parity, and increased with the increase of parity from one to four, and then decreased in subsequent parities. The highest does reproduction rate was found in the Boerka (1.82), followed by Boer (1.80) and Kacang (1.80). It is concluded that the reproductive performance of the three breed female goat was relatively the same. Key Words: Performance, Reproductive, Boer, Kacang
Post-partum reproductive appearance of buffalo at various levels of GnRH and synchronized with PGF ., Yendraliza; Zespin, B.P; Udin, Z; ., Jaswandi
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 17, No 2 (2012)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v17i2.684

Abstract

A study of reproductive performance of buffalo treated with levels of GnRH was conducted on twenty buffaloes of Kampar. The animals were divided into five groups. Group 1 received 200 µg GnRH, the second group received 250 µg GnRH, the third group received 300 µg GnRH, the fourth group received 350 µg GnRH and the fifth group received 400 µg GnRH. Each group also received 12.5 µg PGF2α at days 7 following GnRH injection. Sign of estrus was observed 9 days after GnRH injection. Statistical analysis was performed based on completely randomized design. Results showed that the injection of 300µg of GnRH that was followed by 12,5 µg of PGF2α was able to show obvious sign of post-partum oestrus, with sign of estrus appeared at oestrus rate of 27.8 hours, following PGF2α injection, with 100% of pregnancy rate and 100% of calving rate. Key Words: Estrus, Pregnancy Rate, Calving Rate
Relationship of molting trait and egg production on crossbred Peking and Alabio ducks Susanti, Triana; Noor, R.R; Hardjosworo, P.S; Prasetyo, L.H
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 17, No 2 (2012)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v17i2.685

Abstract

Selection program through 6 months egg production record as criterion of selection can improve number of egg in a year. However the selected population has still showed molting which is influenced the cessation of egg production, so that its production has not optimal yet. The research has conducted to further learn about the relationship between molting and egg production. This study used 90 females AP ducks (the crossbred of Alabio ♂ and Peking ♀) and 90 females PA ducks (the crossbred of Peking ♂ and Alabio ♀). Observed variables were onset of molting, the length of molting periode and the egg production for 48 weeks. The collected data were analyzed by analysis of variance, correlation and regression. The results showed that based on the starting time of molting the ducks can be categorized into two group i.e (a) molting duck group and (b) non-molting duck group. There were 63 PA ducks characterized non-molting and 21 molting, and there were 42 non-molting and 45 molting in AP ducks. The egg production of these two groups was significantly different (P < 0.01). Since the molting was negatively correlated to the 48 weeks egg production (r = -0.896 for PA and -0.553 for AP), then this trait can be used as the selection criterion for egg production.The linear regression equation for PA of 48 weeks egg production = 80.7-0.369 molting duration, and for AP of 48 weeks egg production = 84 - 0.299 molting duration. Key Words: Molting, Egg Production, Duck
Genetic diversity and haplogroups distributions of Kampung chickens using hypervariable-I mitochondrial DNA control region Arifin Zein, M Syamsul; Sulandari, S
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 17, No 2 (2012)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v17i2.686

Abstract

Until now no studies evaluating the position of Kampung chickens in chicken clade of Asia. Thus studies based on molecular DNA sequence hipervariable-I on Kampung chicken is needed. Molecular studies based on DNA sequences hyper variable-I of Kampong chicken was done to confirm the results of previous evaluations conducted on 15 families of local chickens of Indonesia. An analysis of 210 individuals Kampung chicken (Aceh, North Sumatra, Lampung, Banten, Central Java, Lombok, Sulawesi, Ternate, Morotai and Halmahera) resulted in 51 haplotypes derived from 62 polymorphic sites. Polymorphic sites among the highest seen at 112-397 (93.22%). The highest haplotype frequencies contained in the haplotype H-4 (36.19%), followed by H-1 (18.57%) and H-5 (10, 95%). Kampung chicken phylogeny analysis formed four haplogroups/clade from 7 references of Asian chicken clade. Four haplogroups are clade II = 84.31% (43 haplotypes), clade IIIC = 1.96% (1 haplotype), clade IIID = 3.92% (2 haplotypes), clade IV = 7.84% (4 haplotypes). The results prove of that Indonesian local and indigenous chickens were equally dominated clade II. Analysis of genetic diversity showed haplotype diversity of 0.825 ± 0.021, nucleotide diversity of 0.00600 on average, the genetic distance between populations ranged from 0.003 to 0.011, and the genetic distance within populations ranged from 0.00395 to 0.01031. Genetic distance between individuals in all populations of Kampung chickens was significantly different (P < 0.01). Fus Fs values was negative, indicating high genetic diversity and population expansion on native chicken in Indonesia. Other important result was shown with the major haplotype spread from western to eastern Indonesia, and had strengthened the position of Indonesia as one of the centers of domestication of the chicken. Key Words: Kampung Chicken, Hypervariable-I, Control Region, Mitochondrial DNA, Haplotype, Clade
Utilization of organic chromium from tannery waste on reducing transportation stress and shortening recovery period at beef cattle Santosa, U; Tanuwiria, U.H; Yulianti, A; Suryadi, U
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 17, No 2 (2012)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v17i2.687

Abstract

Transportation increases stress that subtantially decreases body weight and feed comsumption even weight gain loss after arriving at the location of fattening. A research has been conducted to study the effects of organic chromium from tannery wastes on the level of transportation stress and recovery period in beef cattle fattening. Twenty Ongole crossbreed cattles were transported from the Wirasaba Feedlot at Purbalingga in Central Java to the Agro Citra Buana Semesta Feedlot in Malangbong-Garut in West Java for about 18 hours. Completely Randomized Design (CRD) was applied, wih four repetitions. The              Cr-organic was given seven days before and after transportation. Dose of Cr-organic used was: R0 = control diet without         Cr-organic, R1 = R0 + 1.5 ppm, R2 = R0 + 3.0 ppm, R3 = R0 + 4.5 ppm, R4 = R0 + 6.0 ppm. Results showed that 3.0 ppm organic chromium of the dry matter of ration tended to affect physiology and haematological conditions, as well as decreased weight loss, shortened recovery time, improved weight gain. It is concluded that organic chromium supplementation was able to lowered stress levels, shortened recovery time, and increased daily gain for one week recovery process, especially at dose of 3.0 ppm. Key Words: Organic Chromium, Leather Tanning, Transportation Stress, Recovery Period, Weight Loss
Pre-weaning growth performance of Etawah Crossbred goats fed milk replacer ., Supriyati
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 17, No 2 (2012)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v17i2.688

Abstract

In this experiment the effect of feeding milk replacer and dairy milk on the growth performance of pre-weaning of Etawah Crossbred goats was studied. Thirty eight heads of pre-weaning of Etawah Crossbred kids were divided into 2 groups, Group A receiving dairy milk and Group B receiving formulated milk replacer. All kids were fed with colostrum at the first 3 days. The milk replacer was formulated from skim milk, cassava flour, soy flour, corn flour, vitamin, mineral, salt and amino acids (lysine and methionine). The milk replacer was diluted ten times with warm water, then probiotic and sugar were added. The pre-weaning kids fed 300-600 ml milk twice a day, in the morning and in the afternoon. The liveweight of pre-weaning kids were measured every 2 weeks. The experiment was carried out for 12 weeks. The parameter measured were nutrient intakes, ADG and mortality rate. Data was analysed by T test. The proximate analysis results of milk replacer were DM 93.50%, CP 22.20%, Fat 4.62%, GE 3869 kcal/kg, CF 1.31%, ash 4.22%, Ca 0.60% and P 0.46%. The DM and CP intakes were 111.98 and 28.93 g/d; 97.31 and 23.10 g/d, with ME 659 and 379 kcal/kg for group A and B, respectively. The ADG of pre-weaning kids for Group A and B were significantly different (P < 0.05) which were 96.03 ± 11.83 and 83.62 ± 16,34 g/d; mortality rates were 0% and 10% for group A and B, respectively. It is concluded that the rate of the pre-weaning kids of Crossbred Etawah goat fed formulated milk replacer grew slower than kids receiving dairy milk. Key Words: Milk Replacer, Pre-Weaning, Growth, Crossbred Etawah Goats
Influence of concentrate-rice straw ammoniated ratio and fattening period on body weight and meat physical quality of Pesisir cattle ., Khasrad; ., Rusdimansyah
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 17, No 2 (2012)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v17i2.689

Abstract

Pesisir cattle, an original local cattle of West Sumatera, have good genetic potential because they adapt very well to both the low-quality feed, and changes in ambient temperature. This research was conducted to determine body weight, feed consumption and conversion, daily gain and meat quality (tenderness, water holding capacity, cooking loss and pH) of Pesisir cattle in different ration composition and feedlot period. This experiment was done based on Randomized Block Design in 2 x 2 factors with 3 groups. The first factor (factor A) was two kinds of diet i.e. A1 = 50% concentrate + 50% ammoniated rice straw and A2 = 75% concentrate + 25% ammoniated rice straw. The second factor (factor B) was duration of fattening (B1) i.e. 3 months and (B2) 4 months. There was no interaction between the level of the diet with duration of fattening on body weight, daily gain, tenderness, water holding capacity and cooking loss on meat of Pesisir cattle (P> 0.05). Body weight in A2 group was significantly higher than A1 beginning from second month of treatment. Factor A had significant effect on daily gain. The pH value of meat of cattle that received 75% concentrate was lower than that received 50% concentrate. The higher the percentage of concentrate in diet caused better body weight, daily gain, consumption, feed conversion and tenderness. Duration of fattening did not resulted in significant effect on all of parameters except final weight. Key Words: Pesisir Cattle, Feedlot, Ammoniated Rice Straw, Physical Meat Quality
Productivity of Indigofera sp. at different drought stress level and defoliations interval Herdiawan, Iwan; Sutedi, E
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 17, No 2 (2012)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v17i2.690

Abstract

This study was aimed at determining the interaction between drought stress and defoliation interval on the productivity of Indigofera sp. This study was done based on Complete Randomized Design (CRD) 3x2 factorial, the first factor was without drought stress (100% FC), medium drought stress (50% FC), and severe drought stress (25% FC), and the second factor was the defoliation interval of 60 day and 90 days, each treatment was repeated 5 times. Observed variables were biomass production, and leaf/stem ratio. Results showed that there were significant interactions (P < 0.05) between drought stress and defoliations interval on the productivity of Indigofera sp. The highest biomass production of Indigofera sp. (424.47 g/plant) was obtained from treatment of wihtout dought stress (100% FC) combined with defoliations interval of 90 days, while the lowest (184.55 g/plant) was reached at treatment of severe drought stress (25% FC) and depoliations interval of 60 days. The highest leaf/stem ratio (1.47) was reahced at treatment severe drouht stress (25% FC) and depoliations interval of 60 days and the lowest (1.05) was reached at combination treatment of drought stress and depoliations interval of 90 days. Defoliations interval of 90 days showed higer biomass production than depoliations interval of 60 days. Key Word: Drought Stress, Depoliation, Indigofera sp

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