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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 16 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 17, No 1 (2012)" : 16 Documents clear
The qualitative variation of Katingan cattle Utomo, Bambang Ngaji; Noor, R.R.; Sumantri, C; Supriatna, I; Gunardi, E.D; Tiesnamurti, B
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 17, No 1 (2012)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v17i1.707

Abstract

The characterization is main activities in order to identify important trait of Katingan cattle. Information of its phenotypic characteristic is not available yet. The aim of the study is to describe the qualitative characteristic of Katingan cattle. Three location of the study were sub-district of Tewah Sanggalang Garing (Pendahara Village), sub-district of Pulau Malan (Buntut Bali Village), and sub-district of Katingan Tengah (Tumbang Lahang Village). The samples of Katingan cattle were taken as many as possible based on the field conditions to observe pattern of colour, growth of horn and gibbosity appear among two horns. General characteristic of Katingan cattle was various in colours of coat, having horns, humped and dewlop. The main characteristics were expressed at female of Katingan cattle. There were six variations of horn shape at female, however the growth of arching forwards was dominant (78.4%). Horn shape of male was generally grown upside (98.3%). Gibbosity was founded among horn only at female cattle (92.6%). There were 9 combinations of coat colour of female Katingan Cattle, those were brown reddish (27%), brown whitish (14.1%), brown like colour of Bali cattle (13.8%), black (12.5%), brown dull (9.6%), brown sorrel (9.3%), blackish (7.1%), white brownish (5.5%) and white grayish (4.5%). Male of Katingan cattle had eight colour combinations, those were brown whitish (14.8%), brown whitish and reddish (14.8%), brown reddish (13.1%), blackish (12.3%), brown whiteish with black withers (10.7%), brown sorrel (9.8%) and brown sorrel with black withers (7.8%). Based on qualitative analysis, the Katingan cattle had variations in coat of colour, growth of horn and the gibbosity. The variation of coat colour had potentially selection related to the value of cultural. Key Words: Katingan Cattle, Qualitative, Coat Colour, Horn, Gibbosity
Carcass and physical meat characteristics of thin tail sheep (TTS) based on calpastatin gene (CAST) (Locus intron 5 – exon 6) genotypes variation Dagong, Muhammad Ihsan Andi; Herman, R; Sumantri, C; Noor, R.R; Yamin, M
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 17, No 1 (2012)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v17i1.708

Abstract

The quality of sheep carcass is mostly determined by the total lean meat production, meat distribution on the carcass and the quality of meat. Calpastatin gene (CAST) is known to have an association with carcass and meat quality traits. The objective of this research was to identify the association between CAST polymorphisms and carcass characteristics in Thin Tail Sheep (TTS). Thirty three heads of sheep representing three genotypes of CAST (CAST-11, CAST-12 and CAST-22) were identified for carcass and meat characterisation. There was no significant difference between CAST polymorphisms with meat tenderness, pH, water holding capacity and cooking loss, neither with carcass weight and dressing percentage among genotypes. Shoulder proportion of CAST-11 genotype was larger than that of CAST-12 or CAST-22, but the lean meat proportion of CAST-22 genotype in shoulder, rack and loin were higher than those of CAST-11 but not different from CAST-12. The fat percentage of CAST-11 was the highest among the genotypes. CAST-22 genotype has higher lean meat percentage than the CAST-11. Variation in CAST gene could be used as marker assisted selection in sheep for higher lean meat proportion. Key Words: Calpastatin, Polymorphisms, Carcass Characteristics, Meat Quality, Thin Tail Sheep
Genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationship of Indonesian Local goats using microsatellite DNA markers Syamsul Arifin Zein, M; Sulandari, S; ., Muladno; ., Subandriyo; ., Riwantoro
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 17, No 1 (2012)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v17i1.709

Abstract

Genetic diversity is important information in the process of conservation and sustainable utilization of animal genetic resources. Thirteen microsatellite markers were used to estimate the degree of genetic diversity on five Indonesian local goats. Results showed the highest average allele diversity present in the locus MAF70 (5.6 ± 2.9), and the lowest was in the locus MAF035 (1.6 ± 0.6), the average number of alleles per locus was 6 ± 2.3. The lowest average alleles diversity present was in the Gembrong goat (2.2 ± 1.1) and the highest was in the Jawarandu goat (4.9 ± 2.2). There is a unique alleles at loci MCM527 and present in all Indonesian local goat with the highest allele frequency on Peranakan Etawa (37.2%) and lowest in Gembrong goat (7.9%). H0 ranged from 0.372 ± 0.173 (Gembrong) to 0.540 ± 0.204 (Peranakan Etawa), and HE ranging from 0.249 ± 0.196 (Gembrong) to 0.540 ± 0.212 (Peranakan Etawa).The genetic differentiation for inbreeding among population (FIS), within population (FIT), and average genetic differention (FST) were 0,0208 (2,08%), 0,1532 (15,32%), and 0,1352 (13,52%), respectively. Locus ILSTS029, BMS1494, MAF035 and INRA0132 had a low PIC value (PIC < 0.25), locus SRCRSP3, OARFCB20, ILSTS005, SPS113, MCM527, and ETH10 provide moderate (PIC = 0.25 to 0.5), and locus CSRD247, MAF70, and ILSTS11 had high value PIC > 0.5. Phylogenetic relationship was consistent with the history of its development based on Kacang goat except was for Gembrong Goat. This research information can be used for conservation strategies and breeding programs on each population of Indonesian local goat. Key Words: Local Goat, Indonesia, Microsatellites, Genetic Diversity, PIC
Geographical characteristics of Chrsyomya bezziana based on external morphology study Wardhana, April H.; Muharsini, S; Ready, P.D; Cameron, M.M; Hall, M.J.R
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 17, No 1 (2012)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v17i1.710

Abstract

Correct identification of Chrysomya bezziana is a fundamental step to evaluate the successfulness of the eradication program based on Sterile Insect Techinque (SIT). However, geographical variation of the fly is being controversial among scientists. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of preservation method on visualisation of characters of external morphology and to analyse geographical variation of C. bezziana populations throughout their distribution regions. A total of 88 flies collected from 7 populations in Indonesia, 2 populations in Africa and each 1 population from Oman, India, Malaysia and Papua New Guinea (PNG) were tested in the study. All larvae were removed from natural myiasis cases. The larvae were reared at laboratory until they became adult flies. The samples were preserved into two methods, wet (80% ethanol) and dried (pin) methods. Ten external characters of head and body were observed.  Data were subjected to principal components and hierarchical cluster analyses in UNISTATÒ software. The Euclid distance measure was used for the cluster analysis, and the linking method used was the unweighted pair-group method using arithmetic average (UPGMA), to compute the distance between clusters. Results indicated that dried preservation (pinned samples) provided better external character than ethanol preservation. Based on external morphology of adult stages revealed that C. bezziana occurs as two geographical races, African and Asian races. There was no geographical variation of C. bezziana throughout Indonesian archipelago, except for the population from PNG forming its own cluster. Key Words: Myiasis, Chrysomya bezziana, Morphology, Geographical Variaton
ruminal fermentation and blood metabolites of growing goats fed ensiled Indigofera arrecta in complete diets Ginting, Simon P; Tarigan, A; Krisnan, R
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 17, No 1 (2012)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v17i1.711

Abstract

The study aimed to investigate the effects of offering different levels of ensiled  or fresh Indigofera arrecta in completete diets on the feed consumption, ADG, ruminal fermentation characteristics and blood metabolites concentrations in growing goats. The I. arrecta/concentrate ratios of the complete diets were set at 85/100,75/100 and 65/100. Thirty weaned-male goats were used in the study, and were randomly allocated to one of the six treatments (5 heads per treatment). The diets were offered at 4% BW and the animals were weighed weekly. The study was arranged  as a completed randomized design. Feed intake, average daily gain, feed efficiecy ratio, ruminal fermentation (pH, NH3 and VFA characteristics and blod metabolites (glucose and urea) were analysed. Feed intake of goats receiving ensiled Indigofera arrecta were lower (P < 0.01) compared to those receiving fresh I. arrecta. ADG were higher (P > 0.01) when goats were fed diets with lower level inclusion of Indigofera arrecta. Efficiency of feed utilization decreased (P < 0.01) when ensiled Indigofera arrecta was used in the diets, but it was not affected (P > 0.01) by the inclusion level of I. arrecta in the diets. Ruminal pH was not affected by ensiling process, but ruminal NH3 concentrations were greater (P < 0.01) in goats receiving fresh Indigofera arrecta. Ruminal VFA levels were also greater (P < 0.05) in the group offered fresh Indigofera arrecta, but the differences were not significant (P > 0.05) when diets consisted of 65% Indigofera arrecta in the complete diets. Increased  rate of Indigofera arrecta inclusion in the diets resulted in lower (P < 0.01) counts of ruminal microbial population. The concentration of plasma urea nitrogen were neither affected by the ensiling process nor by the levels of I. arrecta inclusion in the diet (P > 0.05), however, the plasma glucose level decreased (P < 0.05) as the level of I. arrecta inclusion in diets increased. It is concluded that I. arrecta could be used as the sole fresh or ensiled foliage in complete diets, although the performances of goats were better when  fresh I. arrecta was offered. The level of I. arrecta inclusion in complete diets was recommended at not greater than 65%. Key Words: I. arrecta, Silage, Complete Feed, Goat
Effect of processing on nutritive value of corn cobs: Chemical composition and in vitro digestibility Yulistiani, Dwi; Puastuti, W; Wina, E; ., Supriati
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 17, No 1 (2012)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v17i1.712

Abstract

One of the causes of in low productivity of ruminants in Indonesia is the lack of continual availability of high quality feed. Agriculture by-product such as corn cob is potential to be used as roughage for ruminants. However its nutrient quality is low; therefore, processing needs to be done to increase its nutrient quality.  The objective of the study was to obtain technology which able to increase the nutritive value of corn corb. Corn cobs were ground to obtain corn grain size and then treated with one of six treatments. These treatments were (1). Urea treatment at the level 3% of DM corn cob, (2). Fermentation using Trichoderma viridae; (3). Combination of fermentation using T. viridae and urea at the level 0.5% DM, (4). Fermentation using Aspergilus niger, (5). Fermentation using A. niger and urea at the level of 0.5% DM and (6). Ensiling of corn cob. All treated samples were dried in an oven then were ground for chemical analyses and in vitro digestibility. The study was done using randomised completely design and the data was analyzed using SAS programe v6.1. Result shows that untreated corn cob had low quality nutritive value which was indicated by its low protein content (2.9%) and low in vitro digestibility (42.5%). All treatments could increase corn cob’s protein contents; the highest increase was on urea treatment and fermentation of corn cob using A. niger supplemented with urea (210 and 172% respectively). The in vitro digestibility was only significantly increased by urea treatment where its digestibility was increased by 43%. On the other hand, fermentation using A. niger either with or without urea supplementation increased neutral detergent fibre digestibility by 300% and 200%. In conclusion, nutritive value of a corn cob can be improved by urea treatment at the level of 3% or by fermentation using A. niger. Key Words: Corn Cob, Silage, Ammoniation, Fermentation
Ruminal fermentation response and nitrogen retention from sheep fed rumen undegradable protein Puastuti, Wisri; Yulistiani, D; Mathius, I.W
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 17, No 1 (2012)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v17i1.713

Abstract

The utilization of rumen undegradable protein, could increase supply of amino acids in small intestine to meet host protein requirement. To increase the utilization of feed protein, feed protein source which is highly degradable should be protected from degradation in the rumen. The objective of the study was to increase nitrogen retention through substitution of fish meal protein with soy bean meal protected by banana stem juice observed from rumen fermentation activities. The study used 18 late pregnant Sumatera Composite breed ewes. Rations consisted of fresh chopped elephant grass, supplemented with a commercial concentrate and mineral block in the form of Comin plus and different types of protein supplement as treatment diets. The type of protein supplements were: soya bean meal (RK), soy bean meal protected with banana stem juice (RKT) and fish meal (RTI). Treatment diets were offered during late pregnancy (from two months before to two months after partus), two weeks adaptation period was carried out before data recording. Design of the study used randomized complete block design. Results of the study show that rumen ammonia concentration in sheep fed on RKT was not significantly different either from RTI or from RK, however, the nitrogen retention was significantly (P < 0.05) different among the treatments (4.92 g/h vs 12.52 g/h; 17.11 g/h). Total VFA production or the proportion of C3, iC4, iC5 and nC5 was not significantly different (P > 0.05), however, proportion of C2 and nC4 was significantly different between diet treatment. Methane emission was higher (70.3 mM or 37.2% higher from total energy VFA) in diet RKT which is indicated that fermentation system was not efficient. It can be concluded the higher rumen ammonia concentration and lower nitrogen retention in protected soy bean meal supplement indicated that soy bean meal protected by banana stem juice in the ration was not able to substitute fish meal protein which is resistance from degradation in the rumen. Key Words: Sheep, Rumen Fermentation, Rumen Undegradable Protein
Ovulation rates and twinning birth following Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) treatment at differents stages of estrus cycle Situmorang, Polmer; Kusumaningrum, D.A; Sianturi, R
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 17, No 1 (2012)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v17i1.714

Abstract

Twinning rate could be increased through genetically approach or through hormonal induction approach. The aim of this study was to observe the effect of first injection of FSH initiated on the ovulation rate. The experiment design was completely randomized with 3 different time of FSH was initiated as treatment using 12 lactating dairy cattle. Injection of FSH was initiated at day 2 (Treatment I), day 10 (Treatment II) and at day 18 (Treatment III) of estrus cycle. A total of 6 ml Folltropin (Equivalent 120 mg FSH) was intramussculary injected in decreasing dossis method twice a day with 12 hours interval for 4 days. Blood was collected on day 12 of estrus cycle for progesterone level. Data recorded were the diameter of ovary (DO), total corpus luteum (TCL), concentration of progesterone (P), percentage of pregnancy and number of birth. The means DO, TCL and P were significantly (P < 0.05) higher after injection (2.0 cm; 2.1 and 1.6 ng/ml) than those before injection (1.4 cm, 1.0 dan 0.6 ng/ml). The time of first injection of FSH was initiated, significantly affect the ovulation rate. The mean DO, TCL and P were significantly higher (P < 0.01) in treatment II (2.6 cm; 4.0 and 2.9 ng/ml) than those in treatments I (1.9 cm; 1.3 and 0.9 ng/ml) or in treatment III (1.6 cm; 1.3 and 0.9 ng/ml). There was no significant diference between treatment I and III. The percentage of pregnant were 25.0; 75.0 and 25.0 for treatments I; II and III respectively. One twin birth and 1 single birth were obtained in treatments II but only one single birth for each treatment I and III. Number of CL were positively correlated with the concentration of progesterone but were not fully useful for prediction number of birth. In conclusion, the dairy cattle gave a better response to exogenous gonadotropin hormone when the first injection was initiated at day 10 of estrus cycle. Key Words: Hormone, FSH, Estrus Cycle, Ovulation, Twin Birth
Carcass and physical meat characteristics of thin tail sheep (TTS) based on calpastatin gene (CAST) (Locus intron 5 – exon 6) genotypes variation Dagong, Muhammad Ihsan Andi; Herman, R; Sumantri, C; Noor, R.R; Yamin, M
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 17, No 1 (2012): MARCH 2012
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (159.339 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v17i1.708

Abstract

The quality of sheep carcass is mostly determined by the total lean meat production, meat distribution on the carcass and the quality of meat. Calpastatin gene (CAST) is known to have an association with carcass and meat quality traits. The objective of this research was to identify the association between CAST polymorphisms and carcass characteristics in Thin Tail Sheep (TTS). Thirty three heads of sheep representing three genotypes of CAST (CAST-11, CAST-12 and CAST-22) were identified for carcass and meat characterisation. There was no significant difference between CAST polymorphisms with meat tenderness, pH, water holding capacity and cooking loss, neither with carcass weight and dressing percentage among genotypes. Shoulder proportion of CAST-11 genotype was larger than that of CAST-12 or CAST-22, but the lean meat proportion of CAST-22 genotype in shoulder, rack and loin were higher than those of CAST-11 but not different from CAST-12. The fat percentage of CAST-11 was the highest among the genotypes. CAST-22 genotype has higher lean meat percentage than the CAST-11. Variation in CAST gene could be used as marker assisted selection in sheep for higher lean meat proportion. Key Words: Calpastatin, Polymorphisms, Carcass Characteristics, Meat Quality, Thin Tail Sheep
Ruminal fermentation response and nitrogen retention from sheep fed rumen undegradable protein Puastuti, Wisri; Yulistiani, D; Mathius, I.W
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 17, No 1 (2012): MARCH 2012
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (52.891 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v17i1.713

Abstract

The utilization of rumen undegradable protein, could increase supply of amino acids in small intestine to meet host protein requirement. To increase the utilization of feed protein, feed protein source which is highly degradable should be protected from degradation in the rumen. The objective of the study was to increase nitrogen retention through substitution of fish meal protein with soy bean meal protected by banana stem juice observed from rumen fermentation activities. The study used 18 late pregnant Sumatera Composite breed ewes. Rations consisted of fresh chopped elephant grass, supplemented with a commercial concentrate and mineral block in the form of Comin plus and different types of protein supplement as treatment diets. The type of protein supplements were: soya bean meal (RK), soy bean meal protected with banana stem juice (RKT) and fish meal (RTI). Treatment diets were offered during late pregnancy (from two months before to two months after partus), two weeks adaptation period was carried out before data recording. Design of the study used randomized complete block design. Results of the study show that rumen ammonia concentration in sheep fed on RKT was not significantly different either from RTI or from RK, however, the nitrogen retention was significantly (P < 0.05) different among the treatments (4.92 g/h vs 12.52 g/h; 17.11 g/h). Total VFA production or the proportion of C3, iC4, iC5 and nC5 was not significantly different (P > 0.05), however, proportion of C2 and nC4 was significantly different between diet treatment. Methane emission was higher (70.3 mM or 37.2% higher from total energy VFA) in diet RKT which is indicated that fermentation system was not efficient. It can be concluded the higher rumen ammonia concentration and lower nitrogen retention in protected soy bean meal supplement indicated that soy bean meal protected by banana stem juice in the ration was not able to substitute fish meal protein which is resistance from degradation in the rumen. Key Words: Sheep, Rumen Fermentation, Rumen Undegradable Protein

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