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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
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Articles 9 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 16, No 4 (2011): DECEMBER 2011" : 9 Documents clear
Effect of cutting interval to productivity and quality of bangun-bangun (Coleus amboinicus L.) as a forage promising commodity ., Sajimin; Purwantari, N.D.; Sutedi, E.; ., Oyo
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 16, No 4 (2011): DECEMBER 2011
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (262.214 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i4.625

Abstract

Coleus amboinicus Lour is one of well known plant and commonly consumed by lactating women in North Sumatera. It is high, in iron and carotene contents. The objective of the research was to study the productivity of C. amboinicus at different cutting intervals. An experiment was carried out in glasshouse as pot trial. Four treatments of cutting interval were 30 days, 40 days, 50 days and 60 days with 10 replications. The treatment was arranged in randomized complete design. Parameters measured were shoot dry matter, and crude protein, Cu, Zn and B contents of leaves, at the beginning, middle and end of the experiment. Result shows that dry matter yield was significantly influenced by cutting interval (P <0.05). The highest shoot dry matter production was obtained at 60 days) cutting interval (34.1 g /plant ) and the lowest at 50 days cutting interval (19.6 g/plant). Similarly, crude protein and Cu, Zn and B content of shoot were also highest at 60 days cutting interval. The shoot dry matter production declined from first cutting to seventh cutting. Crude protein content at 60 days cutting interval was in a range of 12.31-15.59%. Key Words: Coleus amboinicus, Forage Production, Quality Mineral
The growth of Java bulls fed rice straw and concentrates containing different levels of protein Adiwinarti, Retno; Fariha, U.R.; Lestari, C.M.S.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 16, No 4 (2011): DECEMBER 2011
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (56.273 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i4.621

Abstract

This study was performed to determine the growth of Java bulls fed rice straw and concentrates at different levels of protein. Twelve heads of Java bulls, one and a half years old, with initial body weight ranging from 113.83-191 kg were used in this experiment. They were grouped into four replications based on the initial body weight. The rice straw (30%) and concentrates (70%) diet containing three different levels of protein (8.27; 11.03 and 14.43%) were fed during nine weeks. Data gathered were the average daily gain and the average body measurements (chest girth, shoulder height and body length). Result of this study showed that the increase of protein levels from 8.27 to 14,43% did not significantly influence the average daily gain, shoulder height, and body length of Java bulls (P > 0.05), but it influenced daily chest girth (P < 0.05). The average daily gain (ADG), shoulder height and body length were 0.633 kg, 0.08 cm, and 0.09 cm, respectively. The highest average of daily chest girth of Java bulls was T2 = 0.19 cm, followed by T3 = 0.15 cm, and T1 = 0.12 cm. It is concluded that the increase levels of protein from 8.27 to 14.43% did not affect the average daily gain, shoulder height and body length of Java cattle. However, the highest chest girth was achieved by Java cattle which fed concentrate containing 11.03% of protein. Key Words: Growth, Java Bull, Rice Straw, Concentrate, Levels of Protein
The utilization of alfalfa that planted at Tobasa highland, North Sumatra for growing Boerka goat feed Sirait, Juniar; Tarigan, A.; Simanihuruk, K.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 16, No 4 (2011): DECEMBER 2011
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (447.718 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i4.626

Abstract

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is a herbaceus legume which is potential to be used as goat feed for it’s high production and nutritive value. This research was aimed to study the adaptation of alfalfa planted at highland-moderate climate and it’s utilization for goat feed. This research concists of two activities, ie 1) Agronomy of alfalfa that adapted to highland as a goat feed resource, and 2) The alfalfa usage technology as goat feed. On the first activity alfalfa was planted on highland-moderate climate Gurgur, Tobasa District, North Sumatra Province. Data was collected included: growth percentage, morphology and production aspects, and nutritive value. The harvesting was conducted for three times, where the first cutting had done at 100 days after planting. Investigation of morphology characterirtics was done before alfalfa harvesting. The utilization of alfalfa as goat feed was carried out on the second activity which was arranged in a completely randomized design. Twenty male Boer x Kacang crossbred  (Boerka) goats of 5-6 months of age with average body weight 14.2±0.8 kg were randomly assigned to four feed treatments where each treatment consited of five replications. The four feed treatments were: P1 = 100% grass + 0% alfalfa; P2 = 90% grass + 10% alfalfa, P3 = 80% grass + 20% alfalfa, and P4 = 70% grass + 30% alfalfa. Data observation included dry matter intake, average daily gain, feed efficiency, and income over feed cost. Results showed that alfalfa growth percentage was 65% with good growth and high either production or nutritive value. The average shoot dry matter production was 438.6 g/m2 which was equivalent to 26.3 t/ha/yr. The crude protein content of alfalfa on the first, second and third harvesting were 17.93; 21.89 and 17.73 per cent, respectively. The utilization of alfalfa that had been processed to be crude-meal can be applied as goat feed. Supplementation of 70% grass and 30% alfalfa meal showed the best results: ADG 59.17 g/d, feed efficiency 0.14, and IOFC Rp 736/h/d. Key Words: Alfalfa, Herbage, Production, Meal, Feed, Goat
Effect of fermented noni leaf (Morinda citrifolia L.) in diets on cholesterol content of broiler chicken carcass Syahruddin, Erman; Abbas, H.; Purwati, E.; Heryandi, Y.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 16, No 4 (2011): DECEMBER 2011
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (88.957 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i4.622

Abstract

Chicken meat is very nutritious. It is sometimes blamed to cause strock attack and coronary heart disease in human, because of high fat and cholesterol contents in the chicken meat. Therefore, the aim of this experiment is to evaluate the effect of fermented noni leaf levels in diets on the cholesterol content of broiler chicken carcass. The experiment was based on completely randomized design with eight experimental diets containing 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18 and 21% of fermented noni leaf powder. All diets were formulated to contain 22% crude protein and 3000 kcal/kg. Each treatment had three replicates with ten chickens per replicate. Two hundred and forty day old unsex broiler chicks Arbor Acress were fed ad lib. for eight weeks and then sacrificed. Feed consumption, body weight gain, feed conversion ratio, and cholesterol content of carcass were taken as variable responses. Data were analyzed based on analysis of variance and orthogonal comparisons. Results showed that feed consumption, daily weight gain, FCR and carcass content were not affected by the levels of fermented noni leaf in the diet. However, cholesterol content of broiler carcass was significantly (P < 0.05) affected by the dietary treatments. Cholesterol content of the carcass was reduced processed 26.18% 73.06 to 53.76 mg/100g mg/100g chicken meat. The lowest cholesterol level was obtained by feeding the chickens with diets containing 21% fermented noni leaf. Key Words: Morinda citrifolia L., Cholesterol, Broiler Chickens
Effect of proteolitic enzymes with probiotic of lactic acid bacteria on characteristics of cow milk dadih ., Miskiyah; Usmiati, S.; ., Mulyorini
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 16, No 4 (2011): DECEMBER 2011
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (75.567 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i4.627

Abstract

Texture of dadih from cow milk tends to be soft, while dadih from buffalo milk have more compact and solid texture. Enzyme is one of food additives that may produce fermented products made from cow milk that has same charcteristic as dadih’s from buffalo milk. Lactic acid bacteria in fermented milk affect product characteristics. This study aimed to determine the effect of combination of enzyme and probiotic lactic acid bacteria on the characteristics of cows milk dadih. The study was aime designed using completely randomized design (CRD) with 9 treatments, A: renin 2 ppm + 3% Lactobacillus casei; B: renin 2 ppm + 3% B. longum); C: renin 2 ppm + 1.5% L. casei + 1.5% B. longum; D: crude extract of Mucor sp. 0.5 ppm + 3% L. casei; E: crude extract of Mucor sp. 0.5 ppm + 3% Brevibacterium longum; F: crude enzyme extract of Mucor sp. 0.5 ppm + 1.5% L. casei + 1.5% B. longum; G: papain 100 ppm + 3% L. casei); H: papain 100 ppm + 3% B. longum; and F: papain 100 ppm + 1.5% L. casei + 1.5% B. longum). Each treatment was repeated two times. Results showed that combination of renin 2 ppm with 3% of L. casei resulted in the best characteristics of cow milk dadih with viscosity 2278 cP; pH 5.63; titrable acidity 0.56%; moisture 75.03%; protein 6.80%; fat 3.35%; carbohydrate 13.21%; LAB total 6.90 x 1010 cfu/g; it also had a flavor, aroma, texture, and general acceptance that mostly preferred by panelists. Key Words: Dadih, Cow Milk, Enzyme, Lactobacillus casei, Bifidobacterium longum
The potential of sugar cane juice as the liquid supplement and phytase enzyme carrier for poultry by in vitro Widjaja, Ermin; Toharmat, T.; Santoso, D.A.; ., Sumiati; Ridla, M.; Iskandar, S.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 16, No 4 (2011): DECEMBER 2011
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (115.252 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i4.623

Abstract

Most of the components of poultry feed (80%) of grains and meal that contains phytic acid which has anti-nutritional factor because it can bind minerals and reduce its availability. Phytic acid can be hydrolyzed by the enzyme phytase. Phytase enzyme naturally found in sugar cane juice, but its use as poultry feed supplements have not been done. The study was conducted using sugar cane juice PS 851 from Jatiroto PTPN XI, Lumajang, East Java in order to get the information potential of sugar cane juice as a liquid supplement and phytase enzyme carrier for poultry viewed from the aspect of nutrient content of sugarcane juice and phytase activity in the release rate of phosphorus. Research conducted at the Faculty of Animal IPB for 10 months. The rate of hydrolysis of phytase on P was tested using rice bran as a substrate. Sugar cane juice is added to the 2.5% level, using 4-level incubation (1, 2, 3 and 4 hours), each level consisting of 37°C and 42°C; pH 2; pH 4.5 and pH 5 with three replications. Study using a Two Factors Experiments in Completely Randomized Design and it was continued by DMRT test. P release rate was measured by spectrophotometry. The results showed that the sugar cane juice has a phytase activity of 0.0766 U / ml, brix level of 22.15%, containing water 73.03%, protein 0.47%, crude fiber 6.43%, minerals Ca 0.03%, P 0,02%, Co 0.14 mg / l, Fe 1.8 mg/l, Mn 1.55 mg/l, Zn 1.37 mg/ l, Cu 0.19 mg/ l, Se 12.63 mcg/100 g, vitamins B3 5.26 mg/100 g, C 0.72 mg/100 g, E 0.08 mg/100 g, sucrose 32.42%, fructose 2.41%, galactose 2% and glucose 1.58%. Supplementation of 2.5% sugar cane juice can increase the P release rate of 112-235% at optimum conditions of pH 5, at 37°C with a long incubation period of 1-4 hours. Key Words: Sugar Cane Juice, Phytase, Phosphorus
Improving productivity of Rex, Satin and Reza rabbits through selection Brahmantiyo, Bram; Raharjo, Y.C.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 16, No 4 (2011): DECEMBER 2011
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (117.099 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i4.619

Abstract

Selection based on weaning weight in Rex, Satin rabbits and their crosses was done to improve its productivity. Data from the base population (P0), selected population (G0) and an offspring of selected population (F1) were used to estimate heritability using nested analysis method (nested) and best linear unbiased prediction (BLUP). The value of heritability estimated of birth weight, weaning weight, 12 weeks body weight and 16 weeks body weight of Rex were 0.74±0.09, 0.93±0.05, 0.81±0.09 and 0.89±0.06, Satin were 0.96, 0.82±0.22, 0.93±0.40 and 0.97 and Reza were 0.96±0.27, 0.98, 0.86±0.40 dan 0.78, respectively. Increase in weaning weight on selected Rex, Satin rabbits and their corsses were 22.77 g (3.66%), 6.83 g (1.11%) and 65.29 g (10.67%). Key Words: Selection, Rabbit, Heritability, Weaning Weight
Feed consumption and feed conversion ratio of eight weeks old male local ducks treated with santoquin and vitamin E supplement Purba, Maijon; Ketaren, Pius. P.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 16, No 4 (2011): DECEMBER 2011
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (106.184 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i4.624

Abstract

The aim of this experiment was to investigate the effectiveness of santoquin (Sq) and vitamin E (VE) as feed additives to improve performance of male local ducks. The experiment was conducted using a completely randomized design. Two hundred and eighty male day old ducks (dod) of male Mojosari Alabio crosbred ducks were allocated to ten treatments with four replicates and seven ducks/replicate. The experimental diets were: Basal-diet (RO) without antioxidant (RB) (control); RB + 50 ppm santoquin (Sq) + 100 IU vitamin E (VE) (R1); RB + 50 ppm Sq + 200 IU VE (R2); RB + 50 ppm Sq + 300 IU VE (R3); RB + 100 ppm Sq + 100 IU VE (R4); RB + 100 ppm Sq + 200 IU VE (R5); RB + 100 ppm Sq + 300 IU VE (R6); RB + 150 ppm Sq + 100 IU VE (R7); RB + 150 ppm Sq + 200 IU VE (R8); RB + 150 ppm Sq + 300 IU VE (R9). The ducks were fed ad libitum for 8 weeks. Parameters observed were: feed consumption, live weight, body weight gain, feed conversion rate (FCR) and mortality. The results showed that Sq and VE supplementation did not significantly affect (P > 0.05) the feed consumption, live weight, body weight gain, feed conversion ratio and mortality rate of the ducks. This experiment shows that santoquin and  vitamin E supplementation did not affect the performance of male local MA ducks. Key Words: Feed Consumtion, Feed Conversion Ratio, Santoquin, Vitamin E, Local Ducks
Polymorphism of growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene in Holstein Friesian dairy cattle Misrianti, Restu; Sumantri, C.; Anggraeni, A.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 16, No 4 (2011): DECEMBER 2011
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (297.675 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i4.620

Abstract

Growth hormone gene have a critical role in the regulation of lactation, mammary gland development and growth process through its interaction with a specific receptor. Growth hormone (GH) is an anabolic hormone which is synthesized and secreted by somatotrop cell in pituitary anterior lobe, and interacts with a specific receptor on the surface of the target cells. Growth hormone receptor (GHR) has been suggested as candidate gene for traits related to milk production in Bovidae. The purpose of this study was to identify genetic polymorphism of the Growth Hormone Receptor (GHR) genes in Holstein Friesian (HF) cattle. Total of 353 blood samples were collected from five populations belonging to Cikole Dairy Cattle Breeding Station (BPPT-SP Cikole) (88 samples), Pasir Kemis (95 samples), Cilumber (98 samples), Cipelang Livestock Embryo Center (BET Cipelang) (40 samples), Singosari National Artificial Insemination Centre (BBIB Singosari) (32 samples) and 17 frozen semen samples from Lembang Artificial Insemination Center (BIB Lembang). Genomic DNAs were extracted by a standard phenol-chloroform protocol and amplified by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques then PCR products were genotyped by the Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) methods. There were two allele dan three genotypes were found namely: allele A and G, Genotype AA, AG and GG repectively. Allele A frequency (0.70-0.82) relatively higher than allele G frequency (0.18-0.30). Chi square test show that on group of BET Cipelang, BIB Lembang and BBIB Singosari population were not significantly different (0.00-0.93), while on group of BET Cipelang, BIB Lembang dan BBIB Singosari population were significantly different (6.02-11.13). Degree of observed heterozygosity (Ho) ranged from 0.13-0.42 and expected heterozygosity (He) ranged from 0.29-0.42. Key Words: Growth Hormone Receptor, Polymorphism, Holstein Friesian Cattle

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