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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
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Articles 9 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 16, No 3 (2011): SEPTEMBER 2011" : 9 Documents clear
Rate of temperature reduction at cryopreservation primordial germ cells (PGC) of three Indonesian native chicken. Kostaman, Tatan; Sopiyana, S.; Setioko, A.R.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 16, No 3 (2011): SEPTEMBER 2011
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (106.286 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i3.616

Abstract

Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are original cells of spermatogonia in the testes or oogonia in the ovary. PGCs in poultry can be harvested and stored in the liquid nitrogen and can be used for conservation as genetic materials of poultry. The objective of this study was to obtain the optimal rate of temperature reduction on PGCs quality from three different Indonesian native chicken after thawing. Fertile eggs obtained from native chicken were incubated for 56 hours to obtain embryo at stage of 14-16. PGCs were isolated from the blood using modified Nycodenz Gradient Centrifugation technique. There after they were kept in a straw and equilibrated for 15 minutes at 5oC and frozen at the rate of temperature reduction of 0.3, 0.5, and 1oC per minute using embryo freezing machine (FHK Fujihara: ET-1). After the temperature reached -30oC, then they were plunged directly into the liquid nitrogen. Recovery rate and viability of PGCs after freezing and thawing were measured. The results of this study showed that the average recovery rate of PGCs that have been frozen at rate of temperature reduction of 1, 0.5, and 0.3oC per minute were 35.6, 43.9, and 44.9% respectively. However the rate of temperature reduction of 0.5 and 0.3oC per minute did not significantly affect the recovery rate. The average percentage of viability of PGCs that were frozen at the rate of 1, 0.5 and 0.3oC per minute were respectively 62.6, 77.5, and 77.4%. It seems that the viability followed the trend of recovery rates where the 1oC per minute reduction was the lowest quality compared to the other two treatments. It is concluded that the reduction of 0.5 or 0.3oC per minute are considered as the ideal temperature reduction when native chicken PGCs are frozen. Key Words: PGCs, Native Chicken, Conservation
Production and physical composition of Priangan male sheep carcass supplemented by Pasak Bumi peptide (Eurycoma longifolia Jack) ., Zubir; Priyanto, R.; Gurnadi, E.; Manalu, W.; Winugroho, H.M.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 16, No 3 (2011): SEPTEMBER 2011
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (370.145 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i3.612

Abstract

Pasak Bumi (Eurycoma longifolia Jack/ELJ) is frequently claimmed to increase expression of masculinity, including inducing the lean growth. This study was aimed to determine the effect of ELJ peptide supplementation on yield and physical composition of lamb carcasses. Sixteen Priangan rams about 1 year old with average weight of 30.43±1.41 kg were maintained in individual cages. The experimental rams were divided into 4 treatments i.e. T0, T1, T2, and T3. In T0, T1 and T2 treatments, the experimental rams were administered: 0, 1.5, and 3 mg ELJ peptide/kg BW, respectively. In the T3 treatment, the experimental ram were administered 1 mg/kg commercial product eurypeptide®. The ELJ peptide and commercial product were administered first in the morning prior to feeding. The experiment was conducted in a completely randomized design of four treatments and four replications. Data were covariance analyzed with an empty body weight as covariate for carcass weight and the right carcass weight as covariate for carcasses physical composition. The results showed that the weights of dissection body fat of T2 and T3 were lower than T0 (P < 0.05) and T1 (P < 0.01). Fat weight reduction was found in all parts of the carcass and more apparent in the fore saddle. Lean weights were higher ( P < 0.05) in T3 and T2 as compared to T1 and T0. The pattern of lean weight differed among treatments in the wholesale cuts that follow the total lean weight eventhough it was not significant. ELJ peptide treatment did not significantly affect either bone weight or wholesale cuts weight. In conclusion, T2 and T3 can improve carcass composition with equal ability. Key Words: Ram, Eurycoma Longifolia Peptide, Carcass
Comparison of serological test for toxoplasmosis using Immunostick Assay, ELISA and Latex Agglutination Test Subekti, Didik T.; Kusumaningtyas, E.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 16, No 3 (2011): SEPTEMBER 2011
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (233.755 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i3.617

Abstract

Many serological methods were developed in order to improve detection and identification of an infectious diseases. ELISA (enzyme linked immunosorbent assay), is a well-known as the most serological technique and widely used for infectious disease diagnoses, especialy toxoplasmosis in human and animal. Unfortunately, the technique requires specific tools and expertise that are not always available in the field. Inn addition, ELISA needs longer process than other techniques for both small and large number of samples. Another serological assay, namely Latex Agglutination Test (LAT) was known as populer and mostly applied in field for toxoplasmosis diagnosis in Indonesia, both for human and animal serum. However, the accuracy of this technique was slightly lower compared to ELISA, especially for weakly seropositive. Recently, an immunostick assay technique was developed as alternative serological method which has high accuracy as ELISA. The immunostick assay was rapid and simple like latex agglutination test. The immunostick assay was evaluated to detect Toxoplasma gondii infection in goat serum samples and compared to ELISA and LAT. The immunostick assay had a true agreement 95.88% - 100% againts ELISA and their strength of agreement was very good aggreement with ELISA (k = 0.796; AC1 = 0.948). However, LAT had true agreement only 75.74%, either with ELISA or immunostick assay. The strength of agreement of LAT was moderately aggreement with ELISA or immunostick assay (k = 0.447; AC1 = 0.582). Therefore, the immunostick assay could become the first choice for rapid serological assay on toxoplasmosis diagnosis, both in the laboratory and in the field. Key Words: Latex Agglutination, ELISA, Immunostick Assay, FELISA, Toxoplasmosis
The effect of of oligosaccharides from sweet potato on layers performance Haryati, Tuti; ., Supriyati
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 16, No 3 (2011): SEPTEMBER 2011
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (76.561 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i3.613

Abstract

The investigation was carried out to study the utilization of oligosaccharides from sweet potato as feed additives to improve the performance of laying hens. Oligosaccharides were extracted from sweet potato using 80% ethanol. Extractant and residue were evaluated as feed additive. Ninety six of 18 weeks old laying hens from CP 909 Isa Brown were randomly distributed into four treatments with six replicates and four laying hens per replicate. The treatments were: Ro = Control without oligosaccharides, R1 = R0 + 0.1% of extract of sweet potato. R2 = R0 + with 0.2% of residue of sweet potato, and R3 = R0 +  with 0.2% of commercial FOS. The evaluations were carried out up to 25 weeks of egg production. The data were evaluated with statistical analysis using SAT. The results showed that egg production and FCR of R1 and R2 were better than R0 (P < 0.05). The treatments were not significantly affected feed consumption. In conclusion, addition of extract or residue of sweet potato improved (P < 0.05) egg production and FCR of layers compared to control diet. Key Words: Oligosaccharides, Sweet Potato, Performance, Layers
In vitro expression of native H5 and N1 genes of avian influenza virus by using Green Fluorescent Protein as reporter Hartawan, Risza; Robinson, K.; Mahony, T.; Meer, J.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 16, No 3 (2011): SEPTEMBER 2011
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1261.919 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i3.618

Abstract

The hemagglutinin and neuraminidase are important immunogen of avian influenza virus that are suitable for recombinant experimentation. However, both genes have been experienced rapid mutation resulting in diverse variety of genotypes. Hence, gene expression in recombinant systems will be difficult to predict. The objective of the study was to examine expression level of H5 and N1 genes from a field isolate by cloning the genes into expression vector pEGFP-C1. Two clones respresenting fulllength of H5 and N1 gene in plasmid pEGFP-C1 were transfected into chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF), rabbit kidney (RK13) and African green monkey kidney (VERO) cells using Lipofectamine ‘Plus’ reagent. The experiment showed level of gene expression in the VERO cell was higher than in the RK13 and CEF cells. Observations using fluorescent microscopy and Western blotting revealed that the N1 gene was expressed better in all cells compared to the H5 gene. Key Words: H5N1 Virus, Hemagglutinin, Neuraminidase, Gene Expression, Green Fluorescent Protein
Genetic distance estimation of local swamp buffaloes through morphology analysis approach. Anggraeni, Anneke; Sumantri, C.; Praharani, L.; ., Dudi; Andreas, E.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 16, No 3 (2011): SEPTEMBER 2011
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (210.11 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i3.614

Abstract

Information about genetic distances among populations (geographics) of local swamp buffalo is less published. Genetic distance analysis was done among seven local swamp buffalo populations trhough a morphological analysis. Female and male buffaloes were observed for a total number of 905 hds, originating from the Provices of NAD (100 hds), North Sumatera (51 hds), Banten (180 hds), Central Java (203 hds), South Kalimantan (121 hds), NTB (200 hds), dan South Sulawesi (50 hds).  Genetic variation among buffalo populations was calculated by discriminant function of Mahalonobis distance. Genetic distance was estimated by MEGA program. Morphometric measurements of female buffalo in North Sumatera were larger (P < 0,01) than those of buffaloes in Banten, South Kalimantan, NAD and South Sulawesi. Morphometric measurements of male buffalo in South Sulawesi were larger than those of buffaloes in Central Java, Banten, and NAD. Chest width was the highest different morphometric factor (0.969). Buffalo from NTB had the highest similarity (95.0%), followed by buffaloes from North Sumatera (74.51%) and South Sulawesi (74.19%); while the lowest one was from South Sulawesi (38.02%) and Banten (49.44%). Morphological distribution map indicated existence of three local swamp buffalo groups. Grup 1 was presented by buffalo from NTB, distributed in the II and III quadrants. Group 2 was presented by buffaloes from five locations (North Sumatera, Central Java, South Kalimantan, South Sulawesi, and Banten), distrributed in I and II quadrants, and a smaller part distributed in III and IV quadrants. Group 3 was presented by buffaloes from NAD and a smaller part from South Kalimantan and Banten, distributed in IV quadrant. The lowest genetic distance was identified between buffaloes in NAD and South Kalimantan (0.348), while the highest one was between buffloes in Banten and South Kalimantan (1.883). Based on phenogram tree structure, the observed local swamp buffaloes could be classified into 3 cluster, namely: Cluster 1 from South Kalimantan, NAD and Banten; Cluster 2 from South Sulawesi, Central Java and North Sumatera, and Cluster 3 from NTB. Key Words: Swamp Buffalo, Morphology, Discriminant Analysis, Genetic Distance
Effect of fermented Jatropha curcas meal combined with enzymes on metabolizable energy, retention of N, P, Ca and digesteble crude fiber Yusriani, Yenni; Toharmat, T.; ., Sumiati; Wina, E.; Setiyono, A.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 16, No 3 (2011): SEPTEMBER 2011
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (113.713 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i3.610

Abstract

Jatropha curcas meal (JCM) contain high protein, but its utilization as feed ingredient is limited by the presence of several anti nutritive and toxic compounds. A research has been conducted in the Faculty of Animal Husbandry IPB to determine the values of metabolizable energy, crude fiber digestibility, retention of nitrogen, calcium and phosphorous of JCM fermented using Rhizopus oligoporus or of fermented JCM suplemented with enzymes on chickens. In this experiment 25 of ten weeks old chickens were used (20 chickens were fed experimental diets, and 5 chickens were used to measure endogenous energy). A Completely Randomized Design (CRD) with 5 treatments and 4 replications was used in this experiment. The experimental diets were R0 = basal diet without JCM; R1 = the diet contained unprocess JCM 5%; R2 = the diet contained fermented JCM 5%+ cellulase 20.000 U/kg; R3 = the diet contained 5% of fermented JCM + phytase 1000 FTU/kg; R4 = the diet contained 5% of fermented JCM+ cellulase 20.000 U/kg + phytase 1000 FTU/kg. The parameters measured were Metabolizable Energy (ME, Men, TME, TMEn) digestibility of crude fiber and retention of calcium, phosphorus and nitrogen. The result indicated that fermented JCM suplemented enzym phytase, cellulase as well as enzym combination increased metabolizable energy. Nitrogen retention was improved highest significantly (P < 0.01) by feed of fermented JCM suplemented enzyme compared to control diet or diet containing untreated JCM. The fermented JCM suplemented with phytase enzyme (R3) gave the highest nitrogen retention (76.73%.). The highest value of digested crude fibre (24.65%) was on the diet containing fermented JCM suplemented with cellulase (R2). The calcium retention improved significantly (P < 0.05) with diet containing fermented JCM supplemented enzyme compared to that of the diet containing untreated JCM. It can be concluded that fermented JCM supplemented enzymes cellulase, phytase and its combination increased the value of metabolizable energy, digestibility of crude fiber and nitrogen retention. Key Words: Chicken, JCM Fermented, Enzymes, Metabolic Energy
Performance of Garut breed rams fed diets containing various cation-anion difference with or without fish oil supplementation Hidayat, Rahmat; Toharmat, T.; Boediono, A.; Permana, I.G.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 16, No 3 (2011): SEPTEMBER 2011
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (64.371 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i3.615

Abstract

This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of dietary cation-anion difference (DCAD) and fish oil supplementations on dry matter intake (DMI), dry matter digestibility (DMD) and organic matter digestibility (OMD), weight gain, as well as the acidity of urine in Garut breed rams. The experiment was done based on randomized group design with 6 treatments  and 3 groups. The dietary treatments were as follows: R0= basal ration (DCAD +14) without fish oil, R1 = basal ration (DCAD +14) with 3% fish oil, R2 = base ration (DCAD +40) without fish oil, R3 = base ration (DCAD +40) with 3% fish oil, R4 = acid ration (DCAD -40) without fish oil, and R5 = acid ration (DCAD -40) with 3% fish oil. All rations contained 150 ppm of zinc and were offered to 18 of Garut breed rams. The results indicated that DCAD +40 and -40 decreased DMI significantly.  The ration with DCAD +40 had the lowest DMI. Fish oil supplementation decreased DMI. No differences were observed for DMD and OMD.  DCAD +40 and -40 decreased body weight of rams. However, the body weight of rams was very low. Variation of urine pH followed the DCAD pattern. It was concluded that DCAD +40 and -40, as well as fish oil supplementations decreased DMI, body weight and urine pH followed the DCAD pattern. Keys Words: Cation, Anion, Body Weight, Digestibility, Garut Breed Rams
Effect of complete rumen modifier (CRM) and Calliandra calothyrus on productivity and enteric methane productions of PE dairy goat Sukmawati, Ni Made Suci; Permana, I.G.; Thalib, A.; Kompiang, S.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 16, No 3 (2011): SEPTEMBER 2011
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (210.327 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i3.611

Abstract

Methanogenesis in the rumen is thought to represent 2-12% loss of energy intake. The energy loss as methane can decrease animal productivity and feed efficiency. In addition, methane is potentially involves in global warming that affects the atmosphere adversely. A research to improve PE dairy goat productivity and reduce enteric methane emission by supplementation of calliandra and complete rumen modifier (CRM) was conducted for 6 months. In this experiment 20 PE dairy goats were divided into five blocks according to body weight. The experimental design used was a randomized block design that consisted of four treatments, A). Elephant grass 50% + concentrate 50% (control), B). Elephant grass 40% + concentrate 40% + calliandra 20%, C). Elephant grass 50% + concentrate 48% + CRM 2% and D). Elephant grass 40% + concentrate 38% + calliandra 20% + CRM 2%. Data were analyzed statistically using ANOVA and Duncan test. The result showed that calliandra and CRM did not affect nutrient consumption, except that protein consumption increased (P < 0.05) in calliandra treatments     (B and D). Nutrient digestibility increased in CRM (C) treatment, while other treatments did not differ from control. CRM also increased total bacteria (36.84%), milk production (67.21%), milk fat (25.0%), and reduced enteric methane production (65.71%). The improvement of milk production in CRM treatment (C) was followed by better feed efficiency than other treatments. In conclusion, CRM was more effective than calliandra in improving milk production of PE dairy goats and reduced enteric methane emission, but its effectivity was reduced in combination with calliandra. Key Words: Dairy Goat, Calliandra, Rumen Modifier, Methane, Productivity

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